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CNC Vise - My Version

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TomS

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#1
After seeing the Saunders Machine Works Modular Vise I decided I could make my own, with a few changes. After all, isn't copying someone else's idea the ultimate compliment as long as it isn't used for commercial gain?

I used the same Carr-Lane and Mitee Bite jaws as the SMW vise but altered most of the dimensions to suit my needs.
IMG_0422.JPG

The mounting bolt and dowel pin pattern matches my fixture plate.
IMG_0428.JPG


IMG_0426.JPG
 

spumco

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#2
That's my next project, but I really want the sliding feature of the SMW version.
 

TomS

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#3
That's my next project, but I really want the sliding feature of the SMW version.
I changed the mounting feature to fit my fixture plate. Did you know the SMW vise is modeled and saved in Fusion 360? You can access the model, make any changes you want, then create your CAM.
 

Brento

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#4
Where did you find the fixture idea?
 

spumco

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#5
I changed the mounting feature to fit my fixture plate. Did you know the SMW vise is modeled and saved in Fusion 360? You can access the model, make any changes you want, then create your CAM.
Oh yes indeed. My 4th axis trunnion table may have been modeled with the same hole/thread/spacing as the SMW Tormach fixture plate.;)
 

TomS

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#6
Where did you find the fixture idea?
I follow the NYCCNC videos and saw it there. Thought it was a good way to hold raw stock for first operation machining. I could have bought it from Saunders Machine Works but what fun is that. I studied the pictures and created my own model. After spending several hours creating my model I discovered that SMW posted it to Fusion 360. Surprisingly my model was very close to the Saunders Machine Works model.
 

Brento

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#7
Is it easy to make the holders for the fixtures or is it better buying them? Also your opinion on if these fixtures are worth making for manual mills? Im still starting out and making up a project list.
 

spumco

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#8
If they fit your T-slots, then maybe they're worth making. Getting them indicated/perpendicular/square will be fussy. I'm using a dowel-pin fixture plate that automatically aligns them.

How hard are they to make? if you make them flat like TomS, no sweat. If you make them like the SMW version with the taper then it'll be fussy making the angled top and clamp plate.

Unless you have a 4th axis trunnion table, then can cheat and tilt the table and go to town...;)
 

Brento

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Oh i can make a fixture plate for it to stay stationary on and indicate the plate if i do it. I dont have any accessories except the vice on my mill. I plan on making my own idexer using gears from my lathe at some point. I dont have anything set up as i am house hunting currently.
 

TomS

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#10
Is it easy to make the holders for the fixtures or is it better buying them? Also your opinion on if these fixtures are worth making for manual mills? Im still starting out and making up a project list.
I would make them before buying. That's why I have mills, lathes and drill presses and tooling to go with them.
 

Brento

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#11
So which of the clamps are better? The mitee bites or the other style clamps?
 

spumco

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#12
Check out both manufacturer's web sites. The mitee-bite Pitbull clamps are taller, but have more gripping power. The Carr-lane are lower and are reversible (serrated & smooth) but have less holding power.

Make a set for each type and you'd be in business.
 

TomS

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P. Waller

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#14
What makes a vice "CNC" ?
Is it machine controlled?
 

Bob Korves

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#15
What makes a vice "CNC" ?
Is it machine controlled?
If they put "CNC" in the part number, then they can raise the price by 50%. ;)
 

P. Waller

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#16
If they put "CNC" in the part number, then they can raise the price by 50%. ;)
I approve of this.

I have often pondered what segment of the population is the most effected by keywords.
Young motorcycle fanatics are easily swayed, adding a few buzzwords goes a long way such as CNC machined, machined from "billet aircraft aluminum", carbon fibre is an excellent keyword, nanotechnology may be the next big one. Remember Boeing makes every single part from Aircraft Grade Aluminum, including the handles on the toilets

We make motorcycle seats from the smallest carbon atoms available.

Now adult golfers appear to have a good deal of disposable income and seem prone to hyperbole, Dynamically Balanced, Titanium, once again CNC Machined, Carbon Fibre, , Computer Designed, Counter Balanced, Laser Etched, Laser Cut and so on.

My plan is to produce a driver that is exactly what golfers want.
It begins with tree parts that have been buried under peat in the Scottish Mores for centuries, the blanks are extracted, turned on CNC lathes then composited with Carbon Nanofibres in a hearth that is controlled by a PID micro processor and a bitter old woman from Red Point. Afterwards the club head is added to the shaft.

This is the difficult part, it must be investment cast from 3 metals that the average consumer is not familiar with such as Tantalum, Bismuth and alloys such as Iron Oxide, the Iron Oxide provides a barrier to corrosion induced by the oxygen in the air.

This should work a charm, I have already given it a name, BisTaintium
 

Bob Korves

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#17
I have often pondered what segment of the population is the most effected by keywords.
Too true. There is a large portion of our population that is enamored with technical hype, and so they pay through the nose for their toys...
 

spumco

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#18
Tactical.
Nano-(insert anything here).
Surface treatment XXX
Hyper-(insert anything here)
Carbotainium.
Polyeverythene.
S-NorTaintium.

It saddens my heart when folks I know, who are otherwise rather intelligent, buy (and talk about) the stuff they lust after due to marketing jargon. The marketing brochures I get at work (petrochem) are just as bad.

Any hobby, interest, or profession which requires fairly specialized gear/equipment of some sort is probably fodder for this.

If you're looking to make/sell a product where it's likely that marketing tech-hype will improve sales due to emotional buy-in, look for a market segment with the following variables:

Emotional investment in activity (golf)
High-income participants (golf)
Large target market (golf)
Low-information participants (golf) ;)

I think I need to start CNC machining aircraft-grade aluminum, carbon-fibre (note swank spelling) wrapped, nano-dipped golf tees.
 

TomS

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#19
I'm saddened to see that this has moved to a "bash-the-poster" forum. I posted because I thought it would be interesting for others to see or learn from what I had done. It being my post I can call it whatever I want. I chose to call it a CNC vise because the original concept was created by a company focused on CNC machining and building tooling for that purpose. I tweaked the design specifically to use the vise on my CNC mill for CNC machining. Hence the title, CNC Vise - My Version. Some may think these last few posts are humorous, I don't.
 

P. Waller

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#20
No one bashed the poster only people whom are easily swayed by techno babel and marketing hype.

You don't perchance play golf do you?
 

spumco

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#21
Tom,
I apologize completely if you feel slighted. Not my intention whatsoever. Sounds like my attempt to heap scorn on folks who buy in to techno marketing methods fell flat.

You do good work, and I appreciate your sharing that work here. Please keep it up.
-Ralph
 

TomS

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#22
No one bashed the poster only people whom are easily swayed by techno babel and marketing hype.

You don't perchance play golf do you?
I suggest you go to another forum where negative comments are welcome.
 

mattthemuppet2

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#23
just while looking through the OP (lovely work by the way) I started thinking about making a set of soft jaws for my mill vise with a set of O1 hardened "mitee-bite" style clamps for holding thin work. Not a priority project, but it would be neat to do and give me a bit more confidence holding work by the very edge - thin stuff or projects where I need to mill the outside almost to the bottom. I'll add this to my "cogitate while commuting" list, thanks :)
 

Bob Korves

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#24
My comments had nothing whatsoever to do with your fine post, Tom. It was all about Madison Avenue and the machining equivalent. Being that it seems to have pulled the post off topic, I regret my posting and extend my sincere hope to get the post back on track.
 

TomS

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#25
My comments had nothing whatsoever to do with your fine post, Tom. It was all about Madison Avenue and the machining equivalent. Being that it seems to have pulled the post off topic, I regret my posting and extend my sincere hope to get the post back on track.
Bob - what got me going was my thread was hijacked and used to further someone else's agenda. I'm always open to different views and criticism when it relates to the subject matter of the original post. I respect you and Spumco for responding in the way you did. It speaks volumes to your character. Let's move on.
 

rgray

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#26
In the Kurt vise the cnc version is missing the drain-back channels that a manual machine user would want to make the coolant find it's way back into the slots.
Your's has no drain channels so it's a cnc vise.
 

rgray

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#27
Very nice job also.
Looks like it well work well.!!
 

spumco

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#28
I've been thinking about making one of these too. I have a 4th axis with trunnion table so duplicating the SMW design with the tapered top and matching clamp bar for the movable jaw woudn't be too hard.

But since I'm lazy, I'm thinking that a simple 3D tool path machined from the top (part held flat) would result in scallops. But...

A small finishing stepover at fairly high speed (so it doesn't take forever) might result in better holding power. Or at least not worse. And save some serious setup time, especially if somone didn't have a 4th axis.

Moveable jaw:
1. Deck the bottom and profile the sides - flip.
2. Do the top drilling and slotting, and then cut down the tapered section (flat in Tom's version) using a 3D adaptive. Finishing pass with a bullnose with about a 0.015" stepover.
3. Bolt to an angle plate, indicate the jaw 'face' and drill-slot-whatever for the parallels.

Critique?
 

P. Waller

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#29
I suggest you go to another forum where negative comments are welcome.
Thanks for the advice.
However I see nothing negative until now.
 

TomS

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#30
I've been thinking about making one of these too. I have a 4th axis with trunnion table so duplicating the SMW design with the tapered top and matching clamp bar for the movable jaw woudn't be too hard.

But since I'm lazy, I'm thinking that a simple 3D tool path machined from the top (part held flat) would result in scallops. But...

A small finishing stepover at fairly high speed (so it doesn't take forever) might result in better holding power. Or at least not worse. And save some serious setup time, especially if somone didn't have a 4th axis.

Moveable jaw:
1. Deck the bottom and profile the sides - flip.
2. Do the top drilling and slotting, and then cut down the tapered section (flat in Tom's version) using a 3D adaptive. Finishing pass with a bullnose with about a 0.015" stepover.
3. Bolt to an angle plate, indicate the jaw 'face' and drill-slot-whatever for the parallels.

Critique?
I'm not familiar with 4th axis code but couldn't you use your trunnion table to do steps 2 and 3?
 
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