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Compressed Air Hose Clamps

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oskar

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#1
I had to cut the 25 feet long hose in my old portable air compressor because I have no need any more for such a long hose.

Now I have a 5 feet long hose from my compressor and at the end I use the fitting I need which I secure it with this screw clamps we use for water hoses, I think they are called Breeze clamps (you tightened the screw to close the clamp).

I know this clamp is not as per codes but have you used it for similar purposes and does it hold? The pressure in my compressor is about 110PSI
 

francist

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#2
I would not do that. Compressed air is not something to fool around with, and a hose clamp like that is not designed to resist the kinds of pressures involved. There is a very good reason you do not see it done.

-frank
 

pontiac428

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#3
Hose clamps will work fine on 1/4" air hoses at 120 PSI. The problem is with the sharp edges catching your fingers. Oetiker ear clamps fix that problem and cost less.
 

middle.road

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#4
Perhaps this? Saw it posted here somewhere a short while ago. NOt sure for 110PSI. Use Caution.
When a hose cuts loose bedlam follows.
 

GL

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#5
Yep, problem with compressed air is it takes awhile for the energy to disapate. Any incompressible fluid dumps the energy fast (hydraulics). So if the connection blows, the end whips around and can be a wild ride before you can get it under control, depending on where it happens. I agree with pantiac428, not bad for 1/4" line, bigger than that a better solution is required.
 

francist

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#6
Huh, this surprises me. I've never seen anyone rig an air hose like that, but I guess from the looks of it it's not uncommon. Still won't do it myself, but I guess not as unheard of as I thought.

-f
 

oskar

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#7
I would have liked to use the reusable fitting shown here
https://hosewarehouse.com/bn32ru68-...ing-3-8-hose-id-11-16-hose-od-1-4-nptf-thread
but they are in OH USA and do not ship to Canada. Searching now to see if I can locate one in Canada

The one shown on the posted video is a good idea but as far as I know the required tool to make them is not available any more. I saw a similar youtube video yesterday.
 

mikey

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#8
I made a Clamptite tool and there is no way I would trust it to make air compressor clamps. I don't feel the clamp it makes is tight or secure enough to be safe on an air hose. Personally, if I need a short hose then I buy a short hose with the clamps and fittings already done.
 

JimDawson

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#9
I have been using these on my air hoses for years, with a proper barbed fitting they seem to work fine. My shop air runs 150 PSI. But as others have said, the sharp edges can cut fingers, so I just wrap some electrical tape around them.

1543889180520.png
 

pontiac428

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#10
Wire clamps are legit. I've done many lacing wire clamp jobs on everything from my Bradleys in Iraq to my track car. Good USA stainless hard wire is needed, of course. And the application matters (I'd hope that's obvious).

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benmychree

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#11
Those hose clamps that use wire have been used for a lifetime (of senior citizens), they work! They used to use regular baling wire for the purpose.
Another good clamp is Punch Lock, cinch it up, and one good whack with the punch lock tool, cut off the tail, and its good to go. They are made in many sizes, with one simple cinching tool. Where I used to work at Kaiser Steel, they were used on all the compressed air hoses, nearly all the power tools used there were pneumatic, and no problems that I ever heard or saw.
 

oskar

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#12
....... Personally, if I need a short hose then I buy a short hose with the clamps and fittings already done.
That’s my choice Mike but in my area is impossible to fine one or get someone to make one for me. The next best thing would be to get the reusable fittings on the link I posted above. When is done it looks like factory made. You order one based on the OD/ID of your hose (mine is 11/16”/3/8”). You screw CCW one part on the hose exterior and then you screw CW the other part inside the hose interior. A guy on YouTube did it, very neat
 

Hawkeye

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#13
I made a Clamptite tool as well. You can use different sizes of wire and up to six strands around the hose. Their own website mentions that someone even used coat hanger wire in an emergency. I recently repaired a wooden drum which had a big split with some 16 ga wire. I'd use it to clamp an air hose with no hesitation.
 

Downwindtracker2

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#14
I've used those clamps they use on welding hose. But I given the choice, I use Push-on hose and fittings. Both are special to Push-on hose. I think Goodyear makes the hose. And yes, I've used hose clamps and black tape, but use two. The thinner hose clamps deal with the smaller diameter better, I think. The size that uses 1/4" nutdrivers. The oil in the compressed air will degrade the hose then the hose slides off, blowing dust everywhere.
 
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Superburban

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#15
What causes most of the issues we hear of, are mismatched fittings. A 3/8" hose hose clamped to a 5/16" barbed fitting. Using a hose clamp for a 3/4" OD hose, on a 1/2" OD hose, Clamping a hose to a threaded fitting, and so on. The screw type clamps (higher quality then standard heater hose clamps (Hopefully)), are approved for use in auto air conditioning, where pressures go to several hundred PSI.

Maybe a good educational thread, would be to have a good discussion on how to properly select, and use the various fittings. I wish I had a dollar for every brass compression fitting that was wrapped with Teflon tape, or plumbers dope.
 

john.k

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#16
My industrial experience with air hose fittings is that fails involve the typical plastic hose with a white liner and yellow jacket over braided cords....The plastic gradually flows under the clamping force,and the hose pops off the fitting...Which is why the painters always used the small stainless type screw hose clamps.....they could tighten the screw periodically if the fitting was coming loose....I used to make up hoses with the crimp type ring fittings,but they were generally replaced with the screw type by the painters.......after all,they were the users,not me.....I was the maintenance man,too old to do useful work!.....according to a 15 year old.
 

Downwindtracker2

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#17
Air tools are designed to run with standard mill air. Standard mill air is 90psi. That is the industrial standard. Pneumatics is something I've done a lot of.
 

aliva

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#18
I've been using screw clamps for well over 40 years. And never had one blow off yet. Just be sure you have the correct size fitting for the hose and you'll be fine. A good quality rubber hose is what should be used. Forget the cheap PVC hose, pure garbage and kinks constantly. Crimp type or otiker clamps are great in preventing sharp edges, again use the proper size clamp for the hose diameter
 

oskar

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#19
Finally I found locally the reusable fittings I need and here are some pictures.

A lot of people here mentioned a variety of methods to clamp hoses but no one mentioned about these reusable fittings. Is it because they are not good?
 

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john.k

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#20
Mill air at 90 psi .........our plant used 125-135,pressure would go up after shift change,and hiss the 150psi safety valves....Every now and then ,someone would would burst a tire on a bike or car using the airlines ,or worse ,fill the tire full of water from an unused line.Sometimes a 1" line would blow water for 5 minutes.....One kid told me how bad his car was driving,all four wheels were over 100psi,and sloshing with water.
 

rgray

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#21
A lot of people here mentioned a variety of methods to clamp hoses but no one mentioned about these reusable fittings. Is it because they are not good?
I use those and they are the best thing ever. I have never seen them as cheap as the link you posted.
I find them on ebay or amazon and they are in the $7.00 range and still well worth it.
Brand new harbor freight hose reels have a poor end and both of mine cracked at the fitting and began leaking in the first week.
I used the clamps and electrical tape until I found those reusable fittings.
They are built just like reusable hydraulic fittings so the idea is sound. I've never had one come of or leak yet been using them about 4 years.
 

Downwindtracker2

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#22
The last mill I worked at had smallish refrigerator type air dryer, water filters at the stations, and receiver tanks scattered around and still got water . It played havoc with the air tools. That wasn't as bad as the first mill I worked at, it was a sawmill in northern BC. We ran two compressors for 1200CFM but only had 900CFM of dryers. Come the cold mornings in the winter we would be out under the log deck thawing out the solenoid air valves with tiger torches.
 

oskar

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#23
I use those and they are the best thing ever. I have never seen them as cheap as the link you posted.
I find them on ebay or amazon and they are in the $7.00 range and still well worth it.
Brand new harbor freight hose reels have a poor end and both of mine cracked at the fitting and began leaking in the first week.
I used the clamps and electrical tape until I found those reusable fittings.
They are built just like reusable hydraulic fittings so the idea is sound. I've never had one come of or leak yet been using them about 4 years.
Glad to hear rgray that someone else is using them fittings. It was hard to find them in my area but when I found them I bought 4 although I only needed 2 (handy to have them around). It’s true that link has them cheep; I paid here CAD $7.25 each (about USD 5.00). They look neat and easy to install
 

middle.road

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#24
My industrial experience with air hose fittings is that fails involve the typical plastic hose with a white liner and yellow jacket over braided cords....The plastic gradually flows under the clamping force,and the hose pops off the fitting...Which is why the painters always used the small stainless type screw hose clamps.....they could tighten the screw periodically if the fitting was coming loose....I used to make up hoses with the crimp type ring fittings,but they were generally replaced with the screw type by the painters.......after all,they were the users,not me.....I was the maintenance man,too old to do useful work!.....according to a 15 year old.
In twenty years that (15)yo brat will be wishing that he'd learned more from you, just as I lament now not having paid more attention to what the T&D makers were trying to pass onto me when I was young. He needed to get smacked down for that kind of comment though, IMHO...
 

Ulma Doctor

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#25
i have used the correct barbs and band type hose clamps for hundreds of 3/8" air hoses over my career.
it's standard practice in most shops i have been in or around
 

john.k

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#26
Its OT,but the 15 yr old was a funny kid.............he was told not to drive the machines.....everytime you looked he was on a forklift,one time I caught him moving a 50 ton mobile crane across the yard......"the foreman said I could"......yeah right...........bright kid,expelled from school,my bosses got $5000 for employing him from the govt.........which they pocketed ......the kid got into ice,was stabbed thru the heart by his girlfriend ...and survived.
 

tq60

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#27
The crimp rings for PEX tubing works great if correct size.

Requires correct size barb and ring, but if stars are in alignment and your hose is just right and the barb is just right and you happen to have the PEX tool and ammo it comes out clean with no sharp edges.

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