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Considering purchasing 10F-28

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jhinze1970

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#1
I'm attaching a few pictures. I'm not sure of the age but I'm assuming Babbitt bearings because of not T prefix and appears to not have power crossed feed. I've located a quick change gearbox that I can buy for it.

My question is what is a fair price (was my girlfriend's late fathers machine and I'd like to be fair in price)? Aside from needing a good cleaning, it's well taken care of.

Any other info would be welcomed.
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FarmDad

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#2
Hard to say without more info . What tooling and tool holders are with it ? Does it have all the change gears still ? Steady and or follow rest ? ect...
How beat up and or worn are the ways ? .. There is just a lot of variable factors that go into lathe value .
I bought a 10 inch qc in pretty good shape with two chucks , plate , steady rest , and axa tool holder for 700 up here where I live and figured i over paid for it because lathes are real thin on the ground out here in the hinterlands .
 

jhinze1970

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Hard to say without more info . What tooling and tool holders are with it ? Does it have all the change gears still ? Steady and or follow rest ? ect...
How beat up and or worn are the ways ? .. There is just a lot of variable factors that go into lathe value .
I bought a 10 inch qc in pretty good shape with two chucks , plate , steady rest , and axa tool holder for 700 up here where I live and figured i over paid for it because lathes are real thin on the ground out here in the hinterlands .
Thank you for the reply.

It does have all the change gears, has original tool post (no QCTP), ways are in very good shape. As of know, I know for sure it has the chuck that is on it, centers, and additional cutters/tooling. I am unsure about an additional chuck, the steady rest or plate. Based on discussions, there are other accessories, but unidentified as of yet. To my knowledge, it's a single owner machine.

My thoughts were between $400 and $500. I will see if I can nail down any of the other accessory availability.

P.S. Are the babbitt bearings replaceable or should there be issues, the only option is finding a timken headstock on ebay?
 

FarmDad

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#4
I would say you are in the ballpark on value again depending on the " swag " that turns up to go with it . Babbit bearings *are* replaceable though its not as straightforward as popping new roller bearings in would be . I am sure there is plenty of info online about just what the process is for the change-out . Lots of old timers actually liked the babbit bearings better because when in good shape they can give a smoother finish on your cuts . The lantern toolpost should ( if you are unaware of it ) have multiple tool holders to hold the bits . Were it me ... I would drop another hundred plus on an aloris style toolpost right off the bat .
 

jhinze1970

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#5
Thanks again..

I've got a wedge QTPC on my grizzly G0768.. I wouldn't go without one.
And as I mentioned before, I came across a quick change gearbox upgrade for a 10" .. so I'm completely excited.

I would say you are in the ballpark on value again depending on the " swag " that turns up to go with it . Babbit bearings *are* replaceable though its not as straightforward as popping new roller bearings in would be . I am sure there is plenty of info online about just what the process is for the change-out . Lots of old timers actually liked the babbit bearings better because when in good shape they can give a smoother finish on your cuts . The lantern toolpost should ( if you are unaware of it ) have multiple tool holders to hold the bits . Were it me ... I would drop another hundred plus on an aloris style toolpost right off the bat .
 

wa5cab

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#6
J,

As you surmised, it does have babbit spindle bearings. Even without the model number on the nameplate, you can tell because the other choice (tapered roller bearings) does not have removable bearing caps attached with two cap screws (hex head bolts). However, if they were properly lubricated (oiled before every use), odds are that they are still OK. All of the babbit bearing equipped machines came with shim packs under each bolt. Perhaps the first thing to do to evaluate them is to remove the bearing caps one at a time and mic the two packs that should be under each bearing cap. The original shim packs were 0.010" thick and were made up of five 0.002" shims. So, after you have gone through the bearing adjustment procedure, the remaining shim pack thickness is an indication of how much wear has occurred in the bearings. Unless they prove to be worn out, which is unlikely, I wouldn't worry about replacing the headstock with the Timken model.

From the rectangular motor switch mounting plate, the lathe was made no earlier than 1942. From the serial number compared to some with Timken bearings where the bearing dates are known, it was 1942.

To check the bearings, you need to find (or acquire) the Manual of Lathe Operation (MOLO) that came with the lathe. It will have black covers and the binding may in 1942 have been either white multi-finger plastic, or spiral wire binding. Most likely the wire and most likely the wire is in three pieces, but if you do find it, please report on what the binding was, and if wire, whether one piece, two pieces, or three.

Starting on page 9 in the MOLO is the discussion of the babbit bearings, including how to adjust them. The manual also says on page 5 to use SAE 10 engine oil where oil is specified for lubrication. However, sometime in the late 1950's, Atlas changed this recommendation to SAE 20. Which is what I would use. If you cannot locate the original manual, they are often listed on eBay. As over the years, there have been at least 10 versions, you need to make sure which version you are buying. If the covers are gray with an Atlas logo or black with the word Craftsman on the front cover, they will not cover babbit bearings. The one that you need will have black covers with the Atlas logo, and on the first or second page of Part 7 - Threading, will mention the Atlas F-Series Ten Inch lathe. Most likely, it will have white plastic binding but may still have the wire binding.

As far as a fair price to pay for it, you do need to find out how many accessories, if any, are there. All that is visible in the photos is the 3-jaw chuck and either a live center or a small drill chuck in the tailstock. As a general rule of thumb, each accessory, if bought separately, will cost you between $100 and $200. So, assuming that the spindle bearings are still in good condition, start with $400 for the lathe and add $75 to $100 for each significant accessory found. Generally, don't add anything for cutters and other minor bits.
 

jhinze1970

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#7
Thank you very much for your reply.

Prior to reading this, I had done a little homework and ascertained that in all likelihood the bearings are probably good. I'm hoping the original manual is with the lathe (and if so will report back).



J,

As you surmised, it does have babbit spindle bearings. Even without the model number on the nameplate, you can tell because the other choice (tapered roller bearings) does not have removable bearing caps attached with two cap screws (hex head bolts). However, if they were properly lubricated (oiled before every use), odds are that they are still OK. All of the babbit bearing equipped machines came with shim packs under each bolt. Perhaps the first thing to do to evaluate them is to remove the bearing caps one at a time and mic the two packs that should be under each bearing cap. The original shim packs were 0.010" thick and were made up of five 0.002" shims. So, after you have gone through the bearing adjustment procedure, the remaining shim pack thickness is an indication of how much wear has occurred in the bearings. Unless they prove to be worn out, which is unlikely, I wouldn't worry about replacing the headstock with the Timken model.

From the rectangular motor switch mounting plate, the lathe was made no earlier than 1942. From the serial number compared to some with Timken bearings where the bearing dates are known, it was 1942.

To check the bearings, you need to find (or acquire) the Manual of Lathe Operation (MOLO) that came with the lathe. It will have black covers and the binding may in 1942 have been either white multi-finger plastic, or spiral wire binding. Most likely the wire and most likely the wire is in three pieces, but if you do find it, please report on what the binding was, and if wire, whether one piece, two pieces, or three.

Starting on page 9 in the MOLO is the discussion of the babbit bearings, including how to adjust them. The manual also says on page 5 to use SAE 10 engine oil where oil is specified for lubrication. However, sometime in the late 1950's, Atlas changed this recommendation to SAE 20. Which is what I would use. If you cannot locate the original manual, they are often listed on eBay. As over the years, there have been at least 10 versions, you need to make sure which version you are buying. If the covers are gray with an Atlas logo or black with the word Craftsman on the front cover, they will not cover babbit bearings. The one that you need will have black covers with the Atlas logo, and on the first or second page of Part 7 - Threading, will mention the Atlas F-Series Ten Inch lathe. Most likely, it will have white plastic binding but may still have the wire binding.

As far as a fair price to pay for it, you do need to find out how many accessories, if any, are there. All that is visible in the photos is the 3-jaw chuck and either a live center or a small drill chuck in the tailstock. As a general rule of thumb, each accessory, if bought separately, will cost you between $100 and $200. So, assuming that the spindle bearings are still in good condition, start with $400 for the lathe and add $75 to $100 for each significant accessory found. Generally, don't add anything for cutters and other minor bits.
 
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