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Crank Trigger Ignition

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racecar builder

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#1
tread heads

just 'connecting the dots' from where i left off

fooling around with cars to now starting in again.

then: crank trigger ignition was in the Direct Connection Big Book.

i never messed with it.

it was for 'heavy hitter' motors.

now: it's included with my Ford 4.6 engine.

crank trigger ignition fires when the crank and piston

are where they should be.

it bypasses all the slop driving distributor the old way.

trouble is now with overhead cam engines, there's slop in the valve train.

that's 'one treadheads report!':)

Have A Nice Day!
 

Rbeckett

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#2
4.6;s use a cam and crank sensor. The crank is sensed by the wider distance between one set of teeth. The Cam is picked up by a hall effect at the rear of the cyl head. If the crank sensor goes bad it will continue to run, if the cam sensor goes bad it wont start. Crank sensor has prioritym the the cam sensor takes over in closed loop. Did you clean those coils and springs while you had em off? That is about 50% of intermittent misfire cause. Thats any of the P0300 series code.
Bob
 

racecar builder

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#3
mr beckett

just to clear this up i was just saying that

i know of 'crank trigger' from Mopar days

that's it.

Have A Nice Day!
 

Tony Wells

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#4
It actually requires both to control ignition timing accurately, since the crankshaft turns twice for every revolution of the cam. In other words, there are two TDC positions, only one of which is the correct position to determine ignition timing. The correct TDC is indicated by the cam sensor.
 

racecar builder

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#5
mr wells

it may on these new age mobiles

Mopar Big Book had instructions on

how to install crank trigger on engines

i believe it was used in combination with the distributor

it provided more accurate ignition timing

Mopar Big Book also covered setting TDC cylinder #1 timing at #1 not #6

Have A Nice Day!
 

hq308

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#7
Crank trigger

The MSD kit has 4 magnets spaced 90 degrees apart but still needs a distributor to distribute the spark to the correct cylinder.

Not all crank trigger style ignitions need a distributor or a cam sensor however, there is a system known as a 'wasted spark' system that has a crank trigger with separate coil packs for each pair of cylinders that fire 180 degrees apart and fires the coil once per revolution in each cylinder. When the correct cylinder is firing the opposite cylinder is on the end of the exhaust stroke and is getting spark too. From what I know the Buick 3800 V6 is one engine that uses the wasted spark system.
 

Tony Wells

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#8
That is true, and some double ended coils only sparked on the compressed cylinder. And some delivered a sparked regardless. HD comes to mind.
 

brucer

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#9
all i know of the timing systems..

from dodge, the crank sensor is on the back of the engine with the flywheel/flexplate.

chevrolet, since they introduced modern fuel injection, the crank sensor is on the front of the crank which is a reluctor wheel, and the crank sensor is a hall effect sensor.. the cam sensor is inside the distributor on the vortec engines... The LS series engine, the cam sensor is on the front of the cam.. The ls series ignition can be adapted to just about any engine as long as it has a crank and cam.. Its a very robust ignition system.. the more morern LT1 engine had the cam sensor and also the crank sensor in the same distributor which was mounted off the front of the cam, it was an obd1 system and fairly easy to program and manipulate the programming for performance and fuel mileage..

I'm not very familiar with the ford system, I do know its configured in much the same way as the other manufacturers systems.. Ford, dodge and Chevrolet all use their own programming language for the computers..
 
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