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Cutting Fluid Applicator

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Pete301

Swarf
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#1
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I never noticed this forum on shapers before. Is it new?
Anyhow, I have a recurring job I do that needs a good finish and cutting fluid helps a lot since it CR 1018 steel. One of the nice thing about a shaper i like is you can sort of leave it to run and do other jobs in the shop, but instead I had to stay right by it to brush cutting fluid on it. Came up the idea of letting the cutting fluid drip onto the workpiece. It's just a old plastic vial I had laying around. I attached one of those red plastic tube you get with spray cans of WD40 or brake cleaner. Used JB Weld to attach the tube and then squeezed the red tube with pliers to get the right drop rate.
The red tube slides down the toolpost and drip the fluid right by the cutting tool. I put a small magnet on the bottom of the vial so that it stay in position. Just lift it off when your done.
Pete
 

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
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#2
Hi Pete!
yes, this is a relatively new sub-forum.
i like your idea, looks like a very nice finish!
nice work
 

Uglydog

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#3
Interesting suggestion!
The magnet is interesting, I missed it on the first read.
I had to go look at my clapper. No where to secure it. "Howd he do that?"...
Now it makes sense.

Thank you,
Daryl
MN
 

benmychree

John York
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#4
An old fuddy duddy in the shop where I apprenticed had an invention for an oiler that measured an adjustable amount of cutting oil to lubricate the cut; this was on a 24" Gould & Eberhardt Industrial Universal Shaper; he had a pump mounted on the ram, kind of along the lines of a automotive brake cylinder, and an adjustable stop that mounted on a rail on the top of the gib that guides the ram; the stop was adjustable on the rail that located it parallel to the ram travel, and had a fine adjustment on a rod that contacted the oil pump plunger on the return stroke; the delivery of the pump was delivered to the tool holder via copper tubing and flexible tubing. The shop let him make all the parts for it on company time as work permitted, he subsequently got a US patent for it and proudly displayed the number on a nameplate on the pump; he tried to market the patent to G&E, but in the mid 1950s when this took place not many shapers were being made or sold and the offer was declined. When he retired, he took it off the machine and took it home, where he had no use for it except bragging rights.
RIP, Pat Casey
 

Silverbullet

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#5
Like an old squirt gun we kids used to shoot each other . Oh no , pointing a playgun yes no one ever died in the sixties from them or now. Good idea shame he couldn't sell his invention . I've got some but no money for patents or searches .
Ya could use a chainsaw style oiler for cutting oil on any machine that needs it , cheap enough to make.
 

benmychree

John York
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#6
Personally, I have never seen the need to use cutting oil on a shaper or planer for roughing; for finishing, oil applied with a brush seems to work just fine without constantly re applying it; over oiling just makes a big mess and smoke.
 
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