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[4]

Do I Really Need Reverse?

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kev74

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#1
I've got a Logan 922 with a 1/2 hp motor. When I bought it, it was wired for 220v using the original drum switch. I changed it over to 110v so I wouldn't have to run a new electric line into the workshop, and couldn't figure out how I could wire the drum switch to utilize reverse. So now its only going forward.

After chewing this over in my head for a while now, I'm wondering if its worth while to pursue wiring-in reverse. The chucks for this lathe don't lock on to the spindle, they just spin on. So I'm a little concerned about spinning the chuck off if I got too aggressive cutting in reverse.

Any thoughts on if reverse would be a valuable feature on this lathe - or if I'm better off keeping it forward only - would be appreciated.
 

woodchucker

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#2
I use it when tapping or using a die.
I also use it while using my tool post grinder.
And sometimes I will single point starting closer to the chuck and move away.
So those are the operations I have run. So it's often enough I felt it necessary. Your mileage may vary.
 

kd4gij

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#3
I have a craftsman 12" lathe and I do use reverse. I bore in reverse as I can see what is going on. If you ever need to cut metric threads you will need reverse, as you have to leave the half nuts engaged. When in revers with a screw on chuck, make sure the chuck is on tight and take light cuts.
 

gajunkie

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#4
...make sure the chuck is on tight...
Whats the best way to do this? Seems to me an adjustable wrench on one of the chuck jaws locking the spindle with the back gear lever pulled out, but this seems like its not good for the gears. How tight is too tight?

I've unscrewed the chuck with a few light deadblow hammer taps but even this seems hard on the gears...maybe I'm underestimating the strength of those gears, but I already have two half broken teeth (previous owner) on my bull gear and don't want any more...
 

kd4gij

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#5
I put a piece of wood against the bull gear, run the chuck on till it stops, back it off 1 turn and then give it a spin and use the weight of the chuck to tighten it. And never had it come lose. Just take lighter cuts in revers and bee carful.
 

amuller

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#6
Reverse is useful as people have noted. I'd Want it on any lathe. But with threaded-on chucks and faceplates there are obvious limits to what is safe to do in reverse. (But of course not all work is held in a threaded-on chuck or faceplate. You might be turning between centers or using collets.)
 
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woodchucker

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#7
see if you can get the bull gear brazed, and then recut it .. it will save you from damaging it more.
I put a hex in my chuck and then use a crescent wrench on the hex. That way all the jaws are working.
I do use the back gears. But if it gets real tight like it did once or twice, I take a strap wrench and use that rather than risk my gears.
 

kd4gij

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#8
When I needed to run something heavy in reverse I made a round plate a little larger then the through hole in the chuck. and used a piece of all thread through the spindle lake a draw bar so the chuck can't unscrew.
 
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