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Drill chuck capacity

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PT Doc

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#1
I will be getting a keyless precision drill chuck with integral r8 shank. Options are 1/2” capacity or 5/8”. My drills go up to 1/2” and I will be getting a collet set prior to this purchase. I know better than to use a silver deeming in a keyless. When do you use the capacity above 1/2” in the 5/8” capacity? Which would you get? Thanks in advance!
 

Ed ke6bnl

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#3
I have found that big drills and a keyless chuck makes for hard to loosen the chucks jaws. Stick with the 1/2 in
 

chips&more

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#4
I would not pick a keyless drill chuck for my first chuck. One reason, can’t power tap. Second reason is chuck can lock up on bits. Third reason, can’t feel how tight you are chucking. I would get a key type and would be a Jacobs brand and be ½” cap…Dave
 

PT Doc

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#5
The larger ones often don't close to zero, so some small bits might not work. Just something to think about if you see yourself using smaller bits.
That is correct. The option is 0-1/2” or 1/8-5/8”.
 

Bob Korves

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#7
I would not get a R8 taper shank for the chuck. I would get a straight shank. It is much quicker and easier to change out the chuck with another tool with the same shank size than it is to remove and replace the R8 taper tooling. It also takes up much less headroom and wiggle room to pull down and swing the chuck through the setup if you use a short straight shank on your tooling. Besides that, it will also fit other machines easier. A tool with an R8 shank will pretty much only fit a vertical mill. I would go with a 0-1/2" Jacobs ball bearing chuck, preferably one of the older ones in great condition that says Hartford, Conn, USA. Anything else is an import.
 

Glenn Goodlett

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#8
I just got a nice 0-1/2 keyless chuck for most of my work and then got a cheap 3/16- 3/4 keyed chuck off of ebay for the rare times I need larger than 1/2. The 3/4 keyed chuck with arbor was less than $30 and seems to be decent quality, but, I have not checked run out.
 

chips&more

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#10
I power tap all the time with my keyless chuck.
Why do you take the position you took?
When you run the spindle/chuck in reverse. A keyless chuck can easily un-loosen itself. And when I power tap small taps, I like to know how tight I’m holding the tap. On small taps I want a slip and not a broken tap. And yes, I have slipped a few taps in my chuck. The chuck, its jaws and accuracy have been the same for decades, no problems. I don’t mean spinning all day. Just a slight move of the tap from holding position…Dave
 
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PT Doc

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#11
Thanks for the insight. Will likely be buying a precision keyless chuck and a 14N Jacobs in the future.
 

MrWhoopee

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#12
I would not get a R8 taper shank for the chuck. I would get a straight shank. It is much quicker and easier to change out the chuck with another tool with the same shank size than it is to remove and replace the R8 taper tooling. It also takes up much less headroom and wiggle room to pull down and swing the chuck through the setup if you use a short straight shank on your tooling. Besides that, it will also fit other machines easier. A tool with an R8 shank will pretty much only fit a vertical mill.
I'm with Bob on this one. I cut the 3/4 shank in half (actually less due to the undercut in the middle). There is no need for a 3 in. (or whatever it is) shank in an R8 collet. Reduces the knee-crank workout.
 

gi_984

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#13
I've used an Albrecht keyless drill chuck with integral R-8 shank for years. Bought it new and is dedicated to the Bridgeport only. Works very well for me with zero issues. I have not tried to power tap with it.

I have dedicated drill chucks for each machine. US made Jacobs or Albrechts. Some have MT taper shanks for lathes, drill press, etc. And some have straight shanks for use in lathe turrets or a vertical mill head w/collet set up.

PT doc, what kind of machine is this for? Dedicated for one machine or will you share it with multiple machines?
 

PT Doc

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#14
I've used an Albrecht keyless drill chuck with integral R-8 shank for years. Bought it new and is dedicated to the Bridgeport only. Works very well for me with zero issues. I have not tried to power tap with it.

I have dedicated drill chucks for each machine. US made Jacobs or Albrechts. Some have MT taper shanks for lathes, drill press, etc. And some have straight shanks for use in lathe turrets or a vertical mill head w/collet set up.

PT doc, what kind of machine is this for? Dedicated for one machine or will you share it with multiple machines?
Thanks for the reply. This chuck will be dedicated to the milling machine. For me the keyless with integral r8 shank should work well. Repositioning the work piece if needed will not be an issue with the DRO. It is interesting to read how much runout is specified on some chucks that have quite high price tags. If I decide down the he road that the shank is too long, the I’ll get another with a short 1/2” straight shank or something similar. This will not be used in a production environment. I think it should work out ok.
 

Smithdoor

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#15
I use 1/2" ball bearing Chuck and 5/8" ball bearing Chuck both #2 mores shank so use both mill and lathe
I also have a 5/32" Chuck with a #2 Moses shank

Dave
 

P. Waller

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#16
I will be getting a keyless precision drill chuck with integral r8 shank. Options are 1/2” capacity or 5/8”. My drills go up to 1/2” and I will be getting a collet set prior to this purchase. I know better than to use a silver deeming in a keyless. When do you use the capacity above 1/2” in the 5/8” capacity? Which would you get? Thanks in advance!
Why would you not use a reduced drill shank in a keyless chuck?
 

f350ca

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#17
Keyless chucks tighten with the load applied to them. A bit larger than its capacity will over tighten it to the point you need a pipe wrench to release it. Don't ask how I know.

Greg
 

MrWhoopee

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#18
Why would you not use a reduced drill shank in a keyless chuck?
It was absolutely against the rules in the shop where I apprenticed. As mentioned, there is a likelihood of damaging the chuck, There is also the potential of spinning the drill in the chuck, screwing up the shank. We weren't even allowed to use them in keyed chucks. The only acceptable way to hold them was in a collet. We had taper shank drills for use in the lathe.
 
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