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[4]

Drilling a socket?

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Aaron_W

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#1
I want to make a T handled 14mm wrench to adjust the top nut on a quick release tool post.

I bought a 14mm deep socket at Home Depot which really is almost enough a tool to do the job as is, but where is the fun in that.

The cheapest, easiest way to do it would be to just drill a hole near the top insert a piece of rod and secure it.

I've considered other options including buying a 3/8" T handle hex key and cutting it off so the handle matches my other lathe / mill wrenches, but that is a $15 solution to a $1.99 problem (as if this whole project isn't a solution looking for a problem).



I'm just not sure how hard the metal of a socket is, practical to drill or not?

Home Depot, Husky brand socket, so on the lower end price wise, but generally decent quality.

If drilling the socket isn't a great idea, I can always use some key stock or similar to insert into the drive socket and drill through that. Going through the socket just looks cleaner and makes a slightly more compact tool.
 

agfrvf

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#2
Why not get 3/8ths square stock steel and make a T. Then use JB to epoxy it together.
 

dlane

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#5
Weld it, that’s what I did, also drilled taped two set screw holes where the nut is to keep it there. Not the prettiest weld but it works.
CAAB25E8-FFF2-432B-903E-73FC61ECF9F1.jpeg
 

benmychree

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#6
Being that it is a deep socket and likely pretty hard, you could partially anneal the squared end and be able to drill it easily, you can sit the socket end in water to prevent it from being annealed.
 

Aaron_W

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#7
drill it, weld it, buy one of these and snap it
https://www.craftsman.com/products/craftsman-7-in-slide-bar-handle-3-8-in-drive
(not that i'm endorsing craftsman)

That would be the smart thing to do, but too easy.. :)

I'm really amazed that a small simple (cheap) T handle isn't available commercially, I just want about 3" for a little more grip. Basically like a T handle hex or Torx driver.

Weld it, that’s what I did, also drilled taped two set screw holes where the nut is to keep it there. Not the prettiest weld but it works.
View attachment 265466
That is basically what I'm looking to do, but with the handle centered, and a little prettier. Tiny lathe so doesn't need a lot of torque to snug the nut down.


Being that it is a deep socket and likely pretty hard, you could partially anneal the squared end and be able to drill it easily, you can sit the socket end in water to prevent it from being annealed.

That's an idea, I could probably manage that.
 

Janderso

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#9
You have the taper attachment
You coold sell that and purchase the deluxe Aloris set
 

Billh50

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#10
Most sockets are not that hard. Otherwise they would crack to easily. I have not found one yet that I can not drill with HSS drill bits. I have drilled and turned many through the years. It is the chrome that is hard. But that is a very thin layer and can be ground through before drilling easily with a dremel or hit with a carbide to get through the chrome.
 

Aaron_W

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#11
You should have just bought a wrench.....:grin:
That thought has crossed my mind, I don't think I'm the first to get an idea in his head, and come hell or high water you will have the tool you want, not necessarily what is most practical. :abnornal:

You have the taper attachment
You coold sell that and purchase the deluxe Aloris set
I have the Little Machine Shop QCTP which I understand is basically a knock off of the Aloris QCTP. The thing is they seem to assume you will use carbide tooling and not want to change the angle of the tool frequently, so just have a standard flanged not holding the post down. I use HSS so change angles more frequently.

As Derf so kindly points out easily fixed with a wrench, but I'm in the habit of a T handle hex wrench. Probably swapping the nut for a wing nut would have done the trick too and cost me $0.46.
 

Aaron_W

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#12
Most sockets are not that hard. Otherwise they would crack to easily. I have not found one yet that I can not drill with HSS drill bits. I have drilled and turned many through the years. It is the chrome that is hard. But that is a very thin layer and can be ground through before drilling easily with a dremel or hit with a carbide to get through the chrome.
Good to know and that makes sense. I've read enough posts from people trying to drill something and be told , yeah, we could have told you that stuff is hard (rail road tracks seem to come to mind). Easy enough to ask first as I won't get to it until this evening or tomorrow.
 

Tozguy

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#13
If you drill the socket and stick a handle in it would look like a drilled socket.
Something like this looks better to me :)
 

Attachments

Aaron_W

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#17
I decided to make a little cap that fits on the back that will accept the T handle.

My first official project using the mill. I already managed to slice my thumb on the end mill while setting up the vise (mill not running, but those things are sharp o_O ).

The cap is done, need to drill it and make the T handle tomorrow. Will post photos when done. Thanks for bouncing ideas with me.
 

jdedmon91

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#18
You can drill it, I do it often, just go slow and carefully. I even tapped them. If I use a socket for a project I pick them up at a auto parts store so their are good quality


In fact this is 1 1/4 socket to use hex dies with on my lathe. I bored and bushed the end for 1/2 rod. Drilled and tapped for the handles and the screw for the die holder


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

whitmore

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#20
If you drill the socket and stick a handle in it would look like a drilled socket.
Something like this looks better to me :)
I agree, the square hole is easy to mill (or file) a boss to fit, and the socket is deep enough to just
use a screw and washer to retain that boss. Make any kind of tee handle you like, and attach
it with a hidden screw, washer, and some threadlocker.
 

westerner

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#21
Being that it is a deep socket and likely pretty hard, you could partially anneal the squared end and be able to drill it easily, you can sit the socket end in water to prevent it from being annealed.
This is exactly how I built a gib screw adjuster for my Craftsman/Atlas. The locknut is a 3/8 , adjusting screw is slotted. A minor pain in the neck to get done right. Found an old Proto deep socket. Annealed ratchet end, drilled to fit a 1/4 rod thru. Drilled rod for a 1/8 flat screwdriver blade. Soldered a nut into the business end of the socket deep enough into it to allow socket engagement with gib locknut. Now my flat blade screwdriver is held centered over the adjusting screw.

gib tool 1.jpg gib tool.jpg
I did not attempt to drill the socket first. I assumed my "less than toolroom" quality drill bits were not gonna cut it. :cautious:
 

Aaron_W

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#22
Sorry, I had an issue logging in, but all seems to work now. I finished the wrench over the weekend and have posted photos in the shop made tools forum. Thanks for the help, I'm happy with the way it turned out and it fits nice in the hand.

https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/t-handle-socket-wrench.69272/

Why a socket over a box wrench with the other end cut off?
It is a small lathe and a T handle just feels more comfortable. Probably just habit, it is what I'm used to doing with the old post.
 

British Steel

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#25
I drilled and tapped the M16 centre bolt to take a M8 SHCS, put a compression spring and washer on the M8 to keep the socket for the top nut captive but have enough lift to disengage from the centre bolt's nut - with a 12-point socket it can be repositioned every 30 degrees so the handle's clear of the working space after tightening down (also, I have a thrust bearing between the nut and and the QCTP which lets it tighten down tighter without a lot of grunting and straining as the friction's eliminated and all the force goes into the thread)

Excuse the CAD rendering, easier than fighting my way to the lathe and taking a photo right now!

QCTP top handle.PNG

I'm sure it could be improved, perhaps a tapered / conical cap that the SHCS is set into would look better, but it works...

Dave H. (the other one)
 
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