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Drills vs End Mils

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oskar

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#1
I have a 1/2" aluminum rod mounted on the chuck of my mini lathe and I want to drill a 1/8" hole by 1” deep into it. Can I use a regular drill mounted on the tail stock to do this job or I have to use an end mill?

As a beginner I’m not sure if HSS drills are appropriate for any lathe work
 

David S

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#2
You can use a 1/8" drill bit and HSS is appropriate for use with a lathe. You should spot the work first to get a starting point. 1" is fairly deep and aluminum can be sticky. So something like WD-40 as a cutting fluid is good and then "peck" drill by going in a short way, back out to clear the chips frequently.

David
 

4ssss

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#4
You can use a 1/8" drill bit and HSS is appropriate for use with a lathe. You should spot the work first to get a starting point. 1" is fairly deep and aluminum can be sticky. So something like WD-40 as a cutting fluid is good and then "peck" drill by going in a short way, back out to clear the chips frequently.

David
I don't know where all this WD 40 rumor started but it is by no means a cutting oil or fluid. It's a lubricant.
 

Aaron_W

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#5
Just did something similar on the engine I'm making. I used a #20 drill bit, and I went in about 1" into brass. I used a cheap Harbor Freight HSS drill bit, with no issues. Just go slow and clear the chips frequently. #20 is just a bit larger than 1/8".


Pip Squeak 4 drilling.jpg
 

David S

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#7
I don't know where all this WD 40 rumor started but it is by no means a cutting oil or fluid. It's a lubricant.
I don't have much use for WD-40. I do use it to dissolve old greasy gunk and for removing PSA labels etc. However for years I have found that it does make a good milling and cutting fluid for aluminum. Picked that up from other machinists. So for me personally it isn't a rumor.

David
 

T Bredehoft

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#8
You needn't have any amount of the 1/2 inch rod sticking out of the chuck, The closer the end is to the chuck, the more accurate the hole will be.
 

Bob Korves

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#9
I don't have much use for WD-40. I do use it to dissolve old greasy gunk and for removing PSA labels etc. However for years I have found that it does make a good milling and cutting fluid for aluminum. Picked that up from other machinists. So for me personally it isn't a rumor.

David
WD-40 does work quite well as a cutting fluid for aluminum. So does kerosene, which I suspect WD-40 is mostly made of, at a small fraction of the price.
 

P. Waller

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#10
If a relatively flat bottom bore is required an end mill in the tool post or tail stock is a good way to begin, not nearly as efficient as a drill however.

If a through hole use a drill, if a flat bottomed bore is not needed use a drill, if an engineer draws a part with a blind bore with a full flat bottom beat him/her about the head and ears (-:
 

cg285

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#11
an older friend once said to me (about some sore muscles) "put some wd40 on it" yea right

years later i found a GOOD chiropractor (who actually fixed me many times without a repeat visit and when no one else could)

once with a shoulder injury he said you can keep coming back to me or get some DMSO. "they used to use it in wd40" hahaha
(byproduct of wood manufacturing)
 

Bob Korves

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#12
I have used DMSO for sore old man hands and wrists, and it works pretty well.
 

kd4gij

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#14
I don't know where all this WD 40 rumor started but it is by no means a cutting oil or fluid. It's a lubricant.

It comes from years of good results. Where I used to work We hade a part the required 6 3mm holes in a concave 20mm dia. 2 1/2 inches down in a cylinder. Had big problems breaking drills and holes coming out clean. This was a custom made drill machine from Germany. A rep came over looked at the coolant we where using witch was made by Trim sol. He but WD40 in the machine and no more problems.
 

Aukai

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#15
Just a side note on DMSO, it makes the skin permeable to chemicals. A gentleman passed away after using DMSO on both legs, and spraying organophosphates in his yard.
 

projectnut

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#17
I would think a HSS drill bit would be the tool of choice. Most 1/8" end mills have a much shorter depth of cut. A 3/8" DOC is the most common. I'm sure you could find a special made or have one made. However for one hole I doubt it would be cost effective. Another option would be to grind down the shank on one, but it would take a lot of time and patience to both modify the end mill and plunge that depth. The flutes would likely load up in short order. It would require backing out and cleaning every few thousandths.

Drilling to that depth would also require backing out and cleaning every .050" or so, but it wouldn't be nearly as time consuming or nearly as likely to break the bit.
 

killswitch505

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#19
Just a side note on DMSO, it makes the skin permeable to chemicals. A gentleman passed away after using DMSO on both legs, and spraying organophosphates in his yard.
Exactly DMSO is some really scary stuff be careful with it well be careful with what you’re handing while using it
 

RJSakowski

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#20
I wouldn't use an end mill to make a hole on the lathe for the same reason that I wouldn't use one on a drill press.. Unless the end mill is perfectly centered the flat end will cause the end mill to walk on the work. A drill bit with a 118º angle has a tendency to self center on the rotating work even if the drill is slightly off the spindle axis. If I needed a flat bottomed hole, I would first drill a slightly undersized hole then carefully start an end mill to finish the hole to size and cut the flat.
 

Mitch Alsup

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#21
I wouldn't use an end mill to make a hole on the lathe for the same reason that I wouldn't use one on a drill press.. Unless the end mill is perfectly centered the flat end will cause the end mill to walk on the work. A drill bit with a 118º angle has a tendency to self center
to some extent
on the rotating work even if the drill is slightly off the spindle axis. If I needed a flat bottomed hole, I would first drill a slightly undersized hole then carefully start an end mill to finish the hole to size and cut the flat.
 

P. Waller

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#22
I mostly use DHMO for drilling, turning and milling. It can be fatally toxic given the correct circumstances however so be wary when using it, in moderation it is harmless. Be aware that it causes corrosion so is not suitable for hobbyists in all applications., it is mostly used in production equipment.
 
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