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Drive on car ramps, any experience, making them, using them?

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i'm in the middle of repairing an old small 4x4, i'm doing lot of the work on jack stands but i've come to a point where i need a wheel to roll on and off so i can check articulation and clarence, i've looked around to buy plastic ramps but only one store has them and they are only 10 centimeters high, i've searched google and found only this drawing, looks easy enough to fabricate but i'm concerned about stability side to side, i also want to use the same ramps on my cars for oil changes so i can't make them very high, i'm thinking 20 - 25 centimeters high and 25 centimeters wide, any advice or shared experience is much appreciated.
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Comments

Side-to-side strength could be improved by adding a diagonal brace at the large end. Remember, you'll be using two of them, one on each side of the car, so there should not be very much side force.

I would suggest that you add a level area extending beyond the high end of the ramp, so you don't have to worry about the car rolling off. Or about driving forward too far and going off the end :)

Just my two kopek's worth ...
 
I agree with hman: You definitely need a flat platform at the top for both stability and knowing when you've reached the limit. Building a pair could be an interesting exercise, but it seems like a lot of effort for something that's readily available on the market. I bought a pair of steel ramps about twenty years ago, and they're still in great shape. Will undoubtedly last my lifetime, barring any unforeseen tragedies. Here's a link to a pair on e-bay:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Solid-Steel-3-Ton-6500-LBS-Auto-Ramp-Set-Heavy-Duty-Car-Light-Truck-Repairs-NEW/231830358718?epid=9001814530&hash=item35fa2a8abe:g:b8sAAOSwzhVWrJcz:rk:6:pf:0

If you can't get the link to load, just do an e-bay search on car ramps. You'll find them.

Regards,
Terry
 
If you can find a mobile home front A arms that are disposed of after setting up, they make good ramps for a trailer or car ramps
 
I have full length ramps that are made from 3 X 10 Timbers. They are in two parts. The first part which is the ramp, lifts the wheels by about 12” at the top. Attaching the car length portions lifts the whole car by the 12” and more at the far end. I can try to get photos of the build tomorrow if interested.
 
Harbor Freight do them for 43$ Unless you already have the angle iron welding rods a chop saw and a welder I would buy rather than build.
 
Yeah, flat platform at the end of the ramp, with a stop at the end of it so you don't go off the end of it with no warning.

And depending on the surface the ramp is placed on, you may need to put rubber or something on the bottom of it so you don't just push the ramp forward instead of going up on it.

I bought a set of plastic ramps, which came with some kind of rubber pads that don't work too well. For my truck, I have to use 4wd to get the fronts up on it, in 2wd I'll just push the ramps.
 
Not to denigrate your efforts at being helpful, guys, but please recall that GroceKU is in Macedona. So HF (and other well known US sources) might well be a very long schlep for him ;)
 
Not to denigrate your efforts at being helpful, guys, but please recall that GroceKU is in Macedona. So HF (and other well known US sources) might well be a very long schlep for him ;)
Hman is right, i've said this couple of times, here in Macedonia we do not have: Harbor Freight, Lows, Walmart, none of the "cheap tool stores", in fact almost no made in usa tools at all, ordering online is also expensive, because of the shipping and the high import duties, i've had couple instances where the import duties are double the price of the item, also with monthly income of 200 - 300$ even the cheap stuff is expensive for here.
The wooden ramps do see more sturdy and less prone to slipping but i'm not much of a wood worker and they look heavy.
 
This is a quick sketch i made on a piece of paper, i'm thinking of making it stagert, top part to be 25 centimeters wide, bottom 32 centimeters wide to help with side to side stability also the flat part where the tire rest i may make it like a jack stand so i can place a jack under it and raised that tire if i need more room.
IMG_20190112_102826.jpg

Thanks for the advice, any additional ideas are also appreciated.
 
This is a quick sketch i made on a piece of paper, i'm thinking of making it stagert, top part to be 25 centimeters wide, bottom 32 centimeters wide to help with side to side stability also the flat part where the tire rest i may make it like a jack stand so i can place a jack under it and raised that tire if i need more room.
View attachment 284596

Thanks for the advice, any additional ideas are also appreciated.
The jack stand part seems to be a good idea. I saw several on e-bay like that, but I've never seen that innovation up close. In theory, it probably works well. Dave-r-1 mentioned rubber pads perhaps being useful to prevent skidding while driving onto the ramp. Several years ago, I bought a pair of wheel chocks where I had that problem. I resolved it by welding a strip of 10 gauge steel onto the front of the chocks so the tires would be resting on them instead of the floor. Worked great. Depending on your construction, you may wish to consider this.

Regards,
Terry
 
I had a friend that made a sweet of ramps very similar to what's in the first video and they worked great. They were very stable and relatively cheap if you have the tools and Know how.
In the second video there are multiple variants of the same concept using different materials including wood which should give you a few more ideas.

 
OK I am sorry that I missed your location. I too have similar problems as I live on a sailboat in the Eastern Caribbean. No Walmart and No Harbor Freight here too.

If I may comment on your design I would make the lip at the front of the flat section a little higher. 40 to 50 mm is good.

Think of a way to make sure the ramps wont slip forward. Rubber pads cut from an old tire work on hard surfaces like concrete. On a dirt floor add something to dig in and stop the ramps sliding forward.

I have seen instances where both the above would have saved the car owners big bills. I was 25 years in the motor trade and sometimes coping DIY disasters
 
My father’s father, built bridges and buildings for the railroad. These are copies of what granddad had built for his use.

The ramps are about 6 feet long with a 12” lift and the drive on part are an additional 11 feet long. I use the ramps alone for most servicing of my cars.
Here is a quick shot of one of the ramps that my family has been using for 40 years. Like I stated earlier 3 X 10 timber and the blocking at the end is cut piece from the same timbers. At the end of the ramp, there is a removable piece that fits the pin used to attach the longer 11 foot long pieces. This pin is also used to hold the stop block that the tire would hit. Very simple to build and use. In areas with limited resources, wood is usually available and very durable.

90846944-4338-4D92-9420-45B5C75604A4.jpeg7C050F58-56BC-429F-A85D-FABD05D9401E.jpeg
 
Barncat, i'll make sure to make the stop at the end is big enough to stop the car, because i have french cars with so soft suspension i won't know i'm on the top of them, i'll be trying to drive over the end often. I also will make the entry with a flat plate so the tire applies pressure on the frame before starts to climb, i'll be using them on brush finished concrete, so slip is not a big concern, but i may weld on couple of spikes at the corners.
 
I went by the steel place, and bought some angle iron to start making those ramps, i have some but bought little bigger for added strength, during the week i'll get to making plans and cutting the material to dimensions, i had the steel place cut the angle iron to 1 m length so i can bring it in my car.
IMG_20190112_215020.jpg
 
I made a set of ramps years ago, the only problem as newer car evolved they got lower and the front bumper/fender hit the ramp before the wheel started up the ramp. It's nice to have a nice high ramp to give you room to work under the car but check the height versus length of the ramp before you construct them.
 
Just remember, there also is a "range" for what you can reach when underneath the vehicle, so you don't want it too high. High enough to get under it (possibly with a creeper) and get parts in and out, but making it higher than needed can make actually working on the vehicle much more difficult.

But who of us don't need an ab workout? :)
 
Just remember, there also is a "range" for what you can reach when underneath the vehicle, so you don't want it too high. High enough to get under it (possibly with a creeper) and get parts in and out, but making it higher than needed can make actually working on the vehicle much more difficult.

But who of us don't need an ab workout? :)
I know what you mean, when is too high to work on your back and is too low to stand up.
I work 10-12 hours almost every day of the week at work, my ab are tired by the time i get home.
 
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