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Enco 105-1110/RF-30 just landed in my shop...

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TerryH

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#1
Evening all. Well, the "I gotta have a mill" bug has bitten. Unfortunately budget and room are both a little short. I had pretty much resigned myself to a mini mill and was ready tom buy one on the recent 20%/$100 off deal on Ebay but passed to give Craig's list some more time. Not a lot of used inventory of such in my neck of the woods and when there is it's either. "It's only been sitting outside for the last few years", "It was lovingly cared for while being run 24/7/365 with zero maintenance for the last 30 years", or the opposite end of the spectrum and "It's perfect and I only want $15,000 for it."

But along came this Enco RF-30 a couple of hours away yesterday morning. I freely admit to knowing painfully little about mills but I really want to learn and don't mind putting in a little sweat equity if it's a decent machine which I believe I have found. Older gentleman selling it. He bought it in new 1996 and it's been in his garage ever since. Mostly used as a drill press on wood with very little metal work. He painted it blue as he had worked in a factory that had all green machines and he didn't want a green on at home or so was the story anyway. He told me that everything he had for it was included. Decent bit of tooling, original vice, original manual etc... He build a base to store the tooling. I drove to see it today and it ran perfectly. Very quiet and smooth. I'll do some further evaluation tomorrow but I plan to disassemble and restore it. I paid him $500 for everything. I could tell that he was parting with an old friend so hung out with him for quite a while just listening to his stories. He had taken a milling class when he first got it and he gave me his text books and his workbook from that class. He also had photos of the machine right after he built the base and painted it along with the tooling and clamping kit. Those acted as a reference for him so he could get everything back how it was supposed to be.

I'll be building a new base as part of my restoration. The thing that will bug me from now on is that he was not careful at all with his drilling so the table is marked up pretty extensively. Open to suggestions if there is anyone that has any ideas. Lots of the damage is shallow so perhaps have it surface ground would help? Anyway, I'll begin to process it's needs and my wants tomorrow. For now here's a bunch of "as found" photos to get things started. Comments as suggestions are welcome.







And the table. I realize this is just cosmetic but I hope to be able to at least make it a bit better.





Many parts of it are pretty pristine. All the tags and decals are near perfect.









And some included extras...











 

TerryH

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#2
These are some of the pictures he took and kept all these years...







The text books and work book from his milling class...





The original manual...



His delivery date note...



I'm looking very forward to the process. These books, photos and the story in general make this even more special to me. he asked me to send him some photos when I'm done even though he know that I'm going to paint it back that "ugly green." lol... More to come...

And thanks once again to @mikey for his help and putting up with all me stupid questions.
 

ttabbal

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#3
Good deal Terry! You've got a good pack of tooling to work with there.

For the table, the Bridgeport restoration book I bought has a section about table repairs. The short version is that holes are fine, but burs sticking up are a problem. They recommend a flat stone to knock them down. There's also some info about filling them in. Mine had a few as well, but the previous owner had stoned it nice and flat. I don't mind the dings as I generally plan to work with the vise. Let me know if you want more info from that. Perhaps I can scan that page for you.
 

TerryH

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Good deal Terry! You've got a good pack of tooling to work with there.

For the table, the Bridgeport restoration book I bought has a section about table repairs. The short version is that holes are fine, but burs sticking up are a problem. They recommend a flat stone to knock them down. There's also some info about filling them in. Mine had a few as well, but the previous owner had stoned it nice and flat. I don't mind the dings as I generally plan to work with the vise. Let me know if you want more info from that. Perhaps I can scan that page for you.
Thanks! I'm pretty proud of it. Would appreciate learning anything on repairing the table.
 

dtsh

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I'd say you got a pretty good deal. I have a HF mill/drill and I'm quite satisfied with it. I bought mine new and I can tell you I'd have been tickled to find that locally on CL for that price.

As for the dimples in the table, ignore them if you can, they look superficial and not likely to affect how well a part can be held. If you find they affect the table's flatness, you could probably clean and fill them with epoxy, but then you would have to make sure you take the epoxy down to the surface of the table afterwards and that's going to be more difficult. I would enjoy it for what it is and think of the dimples as price-reducing character.
 

craptain

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I would be very very happy with that machine for that price, and I am sure that you will be. Overall it's in much nicer condition than mine, except for the table. And mine cost more with less tooling and extras. Congratulations.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 

Richard King 2

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#7
What a good deal. I can relate to selling my "stuff" hard to part with my tools as you said "an old friend" I would suggest you either phone the old gentleman and invite him down for a visit or send him a copy of this thread. Printed pictures and all. You sound as if you will make the machines old friend very proud. Good Karma :)

The table has a lot of experience...character some would say. I will be happy to advise on the table repair. I suggest you buy some Vactra 2 way oil to oil it up now and then too.... Rich
 

Dave Paine

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#8
You got a very good deal, perhaps 1/2 of what I would see in my area.

The picture of the mill in his shop with the piece of wood explains how he got so many hiccups in the table due to not having sacrificial boards behind the pieces being drilled.

As others have mentioned, stoning to remove edges and burrs is all you need. The vise will cover the hiccups in the middle. On my milling machine I use UHMW covers on either side. If you did something similar you would rarely see the hiccups.

I love these covers. They reflect light which is desirable for the present lighting situation. They also protect the table from tooling or work hitting the table when "Murphy" pays a visit. Also much easier to clean up chips and debris with the flat surfaces.

I am not using flooded coolant. If I did I could just slide the covers to provide more space for the coolant to drain off the vise into the slots in the table.

Grizzly_G1008_mill_table_covers_8189.jpg

I would consider mounting the vise without the rotary base unless you need the swivel for a project. The mill does not have a lot of Z axis capacity so the rotary base will consume some much needed travel capacity.
 

ttabbal

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#9
I like the idea of the covers. I might have to come up with something like that.

I've read that the swivel base can also affect rigidity. I haven't tested it, but it makes sense. I have mine oiled and stored for later.
 

dlane

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#10
I redid a clausing dp lately with the arc of shame on the table , I filled the holes with jb weld ,let it set up till stiff and took a utility knife blade and shaved off the extra, after hard a flat fine file did a good job of surface finish, looks good to me.
 

TerryH

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You got a very good deal, perhaps 1/2 of what I would see in my area.

The picture of the mill in his shop with the piece of wood explains how he got so many hiccups in the table due to not having sacrificial boards behind the pieces being drilled.

As others have mentioned, stoning to remove edges and burrs is all you need. The vise will cover the hiccups in the middle. On my milling machine I use UHMW covers on either side. If you did something similar you would rarely see the hiccups.

I love these covers. They reflect light which is desirable for the present lighting situation. They also protect the table from tooling or work hitting the table when "Murphy" pays a visit. Also much easier to clean up chips and debris with the flat surfaces.

I am not using flooded coolant. If I did I could just slide the covers to provide more space for the coolant to drain off the vise into the slots in the table.

View attachment 269231

I would consider mounting the vise without the rotary base unless you need the swivel for a project. The mill does not have a lot of Z axis capacity so the rotary base will consume some much needed travel capacity.
I like that a lot. As I am drooling on the picture I'm calculating in my head how long it would take me just to make my vise look like that. lol...

These are 1/4" UMHW sheets? I see the screws so I'm assuming there are perhaps more UMHW pieces on the back to locate the sheets on the table?
 
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Lordbeezer

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#12
I have the same model mill..it does what I need..you did real good..I like getting the history on my machines..stone the bed as others have said..I used to go thru Springdale on the way to the ozarks from little rock..
 

Dave Paine

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I like that a lot. AS I am drooling on the picture I'm calculating in my head how long it would take me just to make my vise look like that. lol...

These are 1/4" UMHW sheets? I see the screws so I'm assuming there are perhaps more UMHW pieces on the back to locate the sheets on the table?
The vise was new when I took the picture, about 18 months ago.

I have done woodwork for many decades so have some pieces of 1/4in UHMW sheets around for potential use in jigs. It makes a very good mill table cover, at least for my needs.

You are correct the UHMW is screwed to the rails on the back side, which I made from wood, since I have lots of wood around and I did not have a thick enough piece of UHMW. These are a snug fit in the slots. I did not bother to seal these so they may absorb cutting oil over time, but easy to replace if needed in the future.

I cut out the curve around the vise mounting holes so the covers fit close to the sides of the vise.

The mill table has a DRO scale cover on the front which is why the front of the table appears wider.

Mill_table_cover_underside_9111.jpg

Your vise should not be difficult to clean up. I hope the jaws are in good shape since these are typically hardened.
From the picture it looks like many years of dust and grime rather than rust.

The vise which came with my mill had some dings in the rails. I milled these to clean them up. I decided later to get a replacement vise.

Vise_rails_after_machining_7538.jpg
 

TerryH

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The vise was new when I took the picture, about 18 months ago.

I have done woodwork for many decades so have some pieces of 1/4in UHMW sheets around for potential use in jigs. It makes a very good mill table cover, at least for my needs.

You are correct the UHMW is screwed to the rails on the back side, which I made from wood, since I have lots of wood around and I did not have a thick enough piece of UHMW. These are a snug fit in the slots. I did not bother to seal these so they may absorb cutting oil over time, but easy to replace if needed in the future.

I cut out the curve around the vise mounting holes so the covers fit close to the sides of the vise.

The mill table has a DRO scale cover on the front which is why the front of the table appears wider.

View attachment 269262

Your vise should not be difficult to clean up. I hope the jaws are in good shape since these are typically hardened.
From the picture it looks like many years of dust and grime rather than rust.

The vise which came with my mill had some dings in the rails. I milled these to clean them up. I decided later to get a replacement vise.

View attachment 269263
Thanks Dave! That will definitely be a project for me to do pretty quickly. I've done wood working for 18 years. I really enjoy it and unlike machining, I just burn the mistakes to keep me warm in the winter. lol... The wood side of my shop...

 
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TerryH

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#15
Spent the day in the shop giving the old girl some love. I think I spent most of that time scraping blue paint off places it is not supposed to be. :oops:

It interesting to me how little oil/lube there is on this mill. Most of the cleanup is just wood dust stuck in a light coat of oil. I bathed it pretty much top to bottom in lacquer thinner to get the worst off. Followed that with mineral spirits and a gray Scotchbrite on the table and the ways. Again, somewhat surprising to me how easily it came clean. I also did the same to the vise.

Few minor things to deal with. One of the table locking levers is broken and one of the stops is missing. Ordered a couple new levers from Amazon and attempted to order new stops from Grizzly that they list for $2 each but they are out of stock. I'll just turn a couple new ones and call it good. The indicator ring on the Y axis was on backwards. X axis hand wheel on the right side has the threads stripped out for the knob. Not exactly sure how I'm going to deal with that but I'm thinking I can go up to a bigger bolt and re-thread it. A general adjustment/snug up did wonders. Every mating surface was dry as a bone. Couldn't locate proper way oil locally so I ordered some and subbed some WD40 for now. It's brutally obvious that the ball oilers haven't been used since it was painted and lube in general pretty lacking.



All part of the fun of scraping and cleaning I suppose...



The clean, adjust and lube made all the difference in the world. So much smoother now.

I removed the house light switch and the crunched work light. I'll order a nice led light to replace it.

I ordered some deep green hammered finish paint. It's current paint which was brushed on, looks much worse in person than in the photos so it's going to take a considerable amount of prep before any painting can happen. I'm in the body shop business so I should be able to manage it. :grin:

Here are the pics from today. Pretty amazing what a little time and elbow grease makes.









And the table. This is as good as it's going to be unfortunately. I stoned it to make sure there were no burrs and followed that with the Scotchbrite. It's a shame but it is what it is and I guess I'll learn to live with it. I plan to make covers like Dave posted.



And with the vise...









I setup the DTI and checked spindle concentricity. Max is .002. Probably more accurate than the operator. lol... But I'm going to order the sealed FAG sealed bearings. Still need to rewire to 240v as well as figure out what I'm going to do for a base. I sure do wish it still had to original base. It's not perfect but overall I'm pretty happy with it. Seems like it's pretty solid.
 
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mikey

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#16
Cleaned up really nice, Terry. This is a really easy machine to work on and you'll be surprised how accurate the spindle can be with good bearings. It is a light duty machine but for hobby use it is more than stout enough for most of us. Have fun with it.
 

TerryH

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Cleaned up really nice, Terry. This is a really easy machine to work on and you'll be surprised how accurate the spindle can be with good bearings. It is a light duty machine but for hobby use it is more than stout enough for most of us. Have fun with it.
Thanks Mike! I’m already having fun with it.
 

Dave Paine

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Thanks for the update, the cleanup was very worthwhile, looks to be a much nicer machine now. Good job. The vise cleaned up better than you expected.

I am officially jealous of your shop space. Nice picture of the spacious woodworking side of the shop.

In my "shop" I often think of the Star Trek phrase "Space - the final frontier" as in I do not have any......
 

TerryH

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Thanks for the update, the cleanup was very worthwhile, looks to be a much nicer machine now. Good job. The vise cleaned up better than you expected.

I am officially jealous of your shop space. Nice picture of the spacious woodworking side of the shop.

In my "shop" I often think of the Star Trek phrase "Space - the final frontier" as in I do not have any......
I’m beyond blessed to have 1200 sq.ft. Of personal shop space. Some kinda glad it had A/C today too.
 

TerryH

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#20
Stole a bit of time this afternoon to thoroughly clean all the tooling and turn a couple of new table stops form some Delrin rod. I mounted to tool holders to the sides of the base just to get everything off my bench as only one drawer is all that is serviceable.









I also orderd some more collets, parallels, 123 blocks etc... New base design is swirling around in my head. I'm going to see if I can scrounge some aluminum drops tomorrow so I can start making some chips.
 

Richard King 2

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#21
I would also buy and install some way wipers. McMaster Call sells 16" strips . SKF sells the old Chicago Rawhide wipers too...or make some out of white felt and some sheet metal like old Logan or South Bend Lathes used. Another tip, buy a stiff paint brush to brush the chips so you vacuum cleaner sucks them up. Never blow off the chips.....good way to blow chips under the no wippered ways. How about cut and pasting what we are talking about in private messages about fixing the table. I am sure many would like to know how to do that too. Rich
 

Richard King 2

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You may want to set the base on 3 points 2 in back and one under front. we can talk about that later....it's close to my bed time....lol
 

TerryH

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I would also buy and install some way wipers. McMaster Call sells 16" strips . SKF sells the old Chicago Rawhide wipers too...or make some out of white felt and some sheet metal like old Logan or South Bend Lathes used. Another tip, buy a stiff paint brush to brush the chips so you vacuum cleaner sucks them up. Never blow off the chips.....good way to blow chips under the no wippered ways. How about cut and pasting what we are talking about in private messages about fixing the table. I am sure many would like to know how to do that too. Rich
Thanks for your help Rich! I will chronicle attempting to fix the table once I start down that road. As you can probably tell I like to take pictures and write so hopefully I can document the process for others to see. I know I'm not the only one that has this issue.
 

TerryH

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#26
If there was any chance that anyone was wondering if I had lost my mind this should end all doubt. What a freaking project. This has got to be the roughest piece of metal I have ever worked on. Nearly every inch was covered with some sort of 1996 Taiwanese body filler. I ended up grinding a good portion of that off and smoothing everything out with some modern US body filler. lol... Finally got some primer on it tonight. Hopefully all this will be worth it.









 
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Cadillac STS

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#27
Looks good.

might consider changing the Drive belt to a nice new one if it hasn’t been changed in the over 20 years since new. It might run even smoother.

For the light there are some options of ring light LED ones on eBay. Those are nice, hold to the spindle with magnets and put light 360 degrees around where it is needed
 

TerryH

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Looks good.

might consider changing the Drive belt to a nice new one if it hasn’t been changed in the over 20 years since new. It might run even smoother.

For the light there are some options of ring light LED ones on eBay. Those are nice, hold to the spindle with magnets and put light 360 degrees around where it is needed
Thanks! The belts look new but who knows? They could be the originals. I'll probably end up link belts on it. I'll have to check out those lights. I have great lighting where the mill is but still need a task light for it.
 
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craptain

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#29
That body filler is used on 100% of all Chinese/ Taiwanese castings. I don't know why they can't get a better finish. I am also interested in the ring light. I saw one on a YouTube video and was very impressed.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 

TerryH

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That body filler is used on 100% of all Chinese/ Taiwanese castings. I don't know why they can't get a better finish. I am also interested in the ring light. I saw one on a YouTube video and was very impressed.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
I'm guessing that these are sand castings? Can't imagine how they could possible be this rough but they are. It's almost like the carved them out of lava rock.
 
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