[4]

Faceplate Max Speed

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

HBilly1022

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Messages
502
Likes
883
#1
Today I used my faceplate for the first time and note that there is a stamp on the perimeter that states max 900RPM. This is a 12 x 36 King lathe (Grizzly G4003 clone). I just got this lathe as a replacement for the first one I bought last year. I recall the last one had a 4 jaw chuck that was only rated for 1200 rpm but the lathe turns at 1500 rpm max. The new chucks with this lathe are rated at 3600 rpm for the 3 jaw and 2100 rpm for the 4 jaw. I find it very strange that the lathe comes with a faceplate that is only rated for 900 rpm when the machine runs up to 1500 rpm.

Does this seem normal or should I be contacting the manufacturer?

Edit, spelling fix.
 
Last edited:

richl

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 2, 2013
Messages
774
Likes
558
#2
On my pm1440gs, d1-5 spindle, 10" faceplate, the manual says the max speed is 1150 rpms, the lathe will turn 1800 rpms. So this may be the norm. Thanks for pointing that out.
 

Chipper5783

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 25, 2014
Messages
713
Likes
549
#3
Yes, that seems about right. It really depends on the design of the spindle tooling as to how fast it is safe to operate it (the material the spindle tool - chuck, faceplate - whatever, and how it is designed). You can get some pretty big chucks that are rated for higher speeds, but they are going to cost more.

Granted that is not a very big lathe and a pretty slow spindle speed (my 15" has a top speed of 2000 rpm - I've seen lathes slightly larger than mine that run up to 2500. The newer CNCs will have even higher spindle speeds). I don't think it is a big deal, it would be unusual to need to run a face plate job even up to 900 rpm.

They probably saved a few dollars on supplying a lower priced faceplate (no doubt passing the saving on to you), recognizing that it is unlikely that you would really need to run at a high speed.

I don't run my larger spindle tools (10" 4 jaw, 14" 4 jaw, 12" face plate) at higher speeds. I picked up an 8" 4 jaw - it is much more comfortable at higher speed.
 

BtoVin83

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Aug 30, 2017
Messages
154
Likes
158
#4
Faceplates are not designed for high centrifugal forces thus the speed de-rating.
 

HBilly1022

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Messages
502
Likes
883
#5
Thanks guys. That's all I need to feel comfortable about it.

With the setup I had today I couldn't run any faster than 220 rpm or the lathe would start shaking because of the imbalance.
 

BtoVin83

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Aug 30, 2017
Messages
154
Likes
158
#6
We use to bolt on counter balances to keep the shaking down
 

timmeh

isdownthashed.
Registered
Joined
Aug 23, 2014
Messages
81
Likes
19
#7
Perfectly normal.
 

Mitch Alsup

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
280
Likes
190
#8
It also depends on whether the item mounted on the face plate is concentric to the spindle bore.
If not concentric, slower speeds are advised. The more non-concentric, the slower.
 

Cobra

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 24, 2013
Messages
627
Likes
482
#9
My experience with the faceplate on my G0750G has shown that I have a very hard time getting things balanced well enough to spin and any speed even approaching 900.
 

NortonDommi

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 15, 2016
Messages
314
Likes
200
#10
Most faceplates are cast iron which is not that hot in tension which is why the lower speed. I've been looking for a while for a bit of hollow bar or suitable plate big enough to make a balancing fixture,(D1-5 mount),that I can put in a vice so I can load horizontal and balance vertical.
 

BtoVin83

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Aug 30, 2017
Messages
154
Likes
158
#11
Large 4 jaw chucks have t slots cut in them and when facing drum flanges sometimes we would put a t-nut and bolt in the slot and tighten against the flange to keep the chatter down. My brother was cruising along on the 60" Tuda facing a flange when the t-nut shot out of the chuck, went through a tool cabinet like a rifle shot.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top