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[4]

Facing Steel...

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The_Apprentice

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#1
I was able to face my aluminum material without issue, but soon noticed that facing steel is another story.

I can cut into the first few mm ok, but then very little going deeper.

I am feeling pretty sure this is because the tool/work pressure is moving the saddle back a little when I try to cut into the work.

I do not seem to have any special saddle-lock, so for those who ran into this same issue I'm curious if there is a quick-fix method, even if unorthodox, or is the only alternative to do a modification (or buy one) for my mini-lathe?
 

magicniner

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#2
If you have a lead-screw you can engage the half-nuts with no feed speed engaged and manually turn the lead screw to position the saddle, that will prevent the saddle moving under the cutting pressure.
 

benmychree

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#3
Check and see if your tool is ground correctly and appropriate for the job.
 

The_Apprentice

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#4
engage the half-nuts with no feed speed engaged and manually turn the lead screw to position the saddle, that will prevent the saddle moving under the cutting pressure.
That's exactly what kind of easy solution I was looking for. I never played with the Hi/Low lever before or swithing the banjo into neutral. Though I noticed the neutral position makes the Hi/Low gear lever rattle a lot. And it feels to shake and rub weird in the other selections as well. I should probably try to see why it's so rough a feel in there. It just doesn't feel good.

Check and see if your tool is ground correctly and appropriate for the job.
I'm using carbide, but confess I'm not an expert on them (yet). Give me a few months and we'll see :)
 

EmilioG

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#5
Is it mild steel or something harder?
 
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DAT510

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#6
Is you carbide brazed or inserts? Carbide in general takes more pressure to cut, since typically it is not ground to the same level of edge sharpness as HSS. The brazed carbide bits I've used have usually been ground to a sharper edge, than the inserts. If you are using a smaller lathe, it can be more difficult to get the results you want with Carbide, since they tend to have less power and rigidity.

Stefan Gotteswinter (YouTube), regrinds his inserts to a sharper edge to get better performance on his smaller lathe.

 
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The_Apprentice

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#7
Is it mild steel or something harder?
I've had the issue with both SS and hot/cold rolled metals...

In any case, I'm ok with just putting the lead screw into neutral now for a work around.

Is you carbide brazed or inserts?
Inserts....
 

woodchucker

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#8
I'm using carbide, but confess I'm not an expert on them (yet). Give me a few months and we'll see :)
Doubtful a few months will do it. Seems like there are so many types of chip breakers, and you have to play with the speeds and feeds. The book may say one thing, but a particular metal may require more or less speed to get the chip to break, and the finish to where you desire.

Like anything else experience and not being afraid to try things.
 
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