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Fine Measurement, Circa 1978

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n3480h

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#1
Before I retired the company gave me a well used 20th Edition of Machinery's Handbook. I use it to this day. The original owner has noted on page 2440 that a Smidge is .060", and a Skosh is .030". Nowhere else have I been able to locate this kind of precise solution to these old quandaries. :eagerness:

Tom
 

francist

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#2
I love stuff like that, and that really is the type of information that gets put away and lost over the ages. Every now and again at work I take great enjoyment in using terms like "scantling" and watch people's brows knit.

Thanks for sharing that little "tidbit".

-frank
 

brino

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#3
Ahhhhh Ha..............so TWO Skoshes per Smidge......... I knew it!

I had an argument with a guy in the mechanical department just last week about this.
But, now I have an irrefutable internet reference to show him.

Thanks Tom!

-brino
 

maker of things

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#4
Boy, that's going to be rough converting to metric. Sounds like a skosh is a "hair" under a mm?:rolleyes:
 

wawoodman

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#5
Ahhhhh Ha..............so TWO Skoshes per Smidge......... I knew it!

I had an argument with a guy in the mechanical department just last week about this.
But, now I have an irrefutable internet reference to show him.

Thanks Tom!

-brino
And if it's on the internet, it has to be true!:blues:
 

astjp2

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#7
I love the term, half a bubble, on my level that is .0002"
 

wawoodman

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#8
I use "half a kerf" quite a bit when fitting trim. When I taught guitar building, we used "half a sixteenth."
 

chevydyl

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#9
Lol rch, you measured didn't you hahaha
 

fixit

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#10
Information overload this morning
 

chevydyl

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#11
Lol
 

Tony Wells

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#12
C'mon guys, this is a family site.
 
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#13
Before I retired the company gave me a well used 20th Edition of Machinery's Handbook. I use it to this day. The original owner has noted on page 2440 that a Smidge is .060", and a Skosh is .030". Nowhere else have I been able to locate this kind of precise solution to these old quandaries. :eagerness:

Tom
You got my curiosity up. Dug up my 20th edition Machinery's Handbook-First printing 1975, out of my tool box, thumbed to page 2440, the last page in the book before the index. Nowhere on that page does it say anything about a "Smidge" or "Skosh". Maybe they added it to the second or third printing?
 

n3480h

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#14
You got my curiosity up. Dug up my 20th edition Machinery's Handbook-First printing 1975, out of my tool box, thumbed to page 2440, the last page in the book before the index. Nowhere on that page does it say anything about a "Smidge" or "Skosh". Maybe they added it to the second or third printing?
Ha! Ken, I must have the "Deluxe Limited Edition". :grin: My book was originally owned by the man who started the company many years ago. One of the finest individuals I have ever known, and with a great sense of humor.

Tom
 

GK1918

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#15
Just ask anyone over 65 !
 
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#16
Ha! Ken, I must have the "Deluxe Limited Edition". :grin: My book was originally owned by the man who started the company many years ago. One of the finest individuals I have ever known, and with a great sense of humor.

Tom
My 20th edition came direct from the publisher. Bought it while I was still in high school! They didn't have a "Deluxe Limited Edition" back then, or I would have bought it!
Can you post a scan of the page?
 
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T Bredehoft

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#18
I can't remember my 65th birthday. Logic tells me it was 1.2 decades ago.

[Edit] correct stupid math error
 
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n3480h

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#19
My 20th edition came direct from the publisher. Bought it while I was still in high school! They didn't have a "Deluxe Limited Edition" back then, or I would have bought it!
Can you post a scan of the page?
Oh my. Ken, I may have been unclear. "Deluxe Limited Edition" was tongue-in-cheek, there was no such edition that I am aware of. The original owner of the book simply wrote the Skosh and Smidge definitions on that page with a pen, also no doubt tongue-in-cheek. I think it made him chuckle later on when he ran across it. It certainly brightened my day when I ran across it years later. I have no scanner, or I would certainly post a pic.

Perhaps we need a sub group for Tongue-In-Cheek Wise Guys, a better place for my original post. My apologies, I just can't be serious very often after so many years of . . . seriousness. Perspicuity, not obfuscation. See? There I go again.o_O

Tom
 
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#20
Tom,

It's all good. No hard feelings. I get serious at times and don't read between the lines on what is being said. That is kinda of neat adding your own definitions to the "book".
I may just do that to mine for someone else later on, to read.

Thanks for sharing,

Ken
 

The Liberal Arts Garage

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#21
I use "half a kerf" quite a bit when fitting trim. When I taught guitar building, we used "half a sixteenth."
When my father was on the roof he'd holler to me (with saw) "right of the line"
"left of the line" "center of the line". ........BLJHB
 

KBeitz

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#22
A pinch is about 1/4 teaspoon and so is a smidge. A dollop is about a heaping Tablespoon.
A skosh is two smidges. A smidge is four pinches or a Tad or a Jig.
A Tad is1/8th teaspoon. A Jig can be big or little...
 
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