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Five Cylinder Radial With Ohc

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D

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The next project is beginning to take shape after doodling for hours on paper and computer I have come up with this offering.

Five cylinders-- 25mm bore X 28mm stroke. with overhead camshafts.

Capable of being made on a 7X12 and a small mill.

It's next winters project and possibly another two winters after that so It will be a long haul.

Drawing.jpg
Watch this Space.

Brian.
 

Franko

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My hat's off to you Brian. That looks very ambitious.

I will be watching.
 

bpratl

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Great project, looks very challenging and sure it will be rewarding when completed.
Looking forward in following this project. Thanks. Bob
 
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Two more drawings showing the cam drive gears and belts, a cover will be fitted over the inner belt pulley's to take the two oil pumps on cylinders three and four. the ignition system will be split between camshafts two and five a magnetic trigger on one and distributor on the other.
Next job will be to draw the crank and accessory shaft.

Slowly Slowly. Brian.

Gear case side view.jpg
Rear View.jpg
 

T Bredehoft

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I was surprised to learn that the early (maybe the first versions) had a stationary crank and backplate and the whole cylinder arrangement revolved. The backplate served the purpose of operating the valves, too. The prop was fastened to the cylinder body and turned with it. I can't imagine the bearings they had....

You've got a great design there, but keeping timing with belts is going to be a problem. Maybe you can use geared timing belts.
 
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Thanks for your concern, the belts I have specified for this engine are 2.03mm pitch 6mm wide M X L timing belts so this problem will not arise.

I will have to put a tensioning pulley on the outside of belt, but as I have not made up my mind if the engine is going to be clock or anticlock rotation, I do not know what side it is going to go because it is best put in the slack side of the belt.
Brian.
 
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Over the past 3 months the engine has evolved . changes to case diameter --stroke --barrel--material & design--cylinder head. Just to name a few.

Side view Firm.jpg
Front view Firm.jpg

However today we cut the first material to make the jig for the crank case, in the design all the parts of the case have the same register diameter allowing me to us a single jig that can be fitted on both the rotary table and the lathe face plate, keeping set up time to a minimum.

P1013122.JPG

The 100mm blanks only just fit in the self catering 4 jaw PHEW!!
machining starts today.

P1013123.JPG



Brian.
 
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The first part of the jig is made , this 90mm od ring has two jobs it is the Go-- No go ring for all the female locations on the crank case and the jig.

also it coverts the female jig into a male .

P1013124.JPG

Brian.
 

JPigg55

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Your design looks a lot like the Cyclone Power engine except it being a 6 vs 5 cylinder, http://www.cyclonepower.com/technical_information.html.
I was talking to a guy on another thread who'd talked to the inventor and he had this info:

"More than you ever wanted to know about the Cyclone valve control system:
The Cyclone automotive system uses a single needle valve in the cylinder head operated by a rocker arm/push rod/cam assembly. Since it is a radial piston design, then all 6 valves are actuated by a single central cam. The cam is forced up automatically with increasing speed using a small hydraulic actuator - the purpose is to advance valve timing with 3-D cam shape and the cam lobe is shortened some to lessen the cutoff range possible. The actual cutoff of the valves is controlled by the operator with a single mechanical rod. The 6 push rods extend from the valve rocker arms at the cylinder heads to the cam through a ring that surrounds the cam. The ring is rotated with the valve control rod (i.e. the throttle control). In the neutral position the ring positions the 6 push rods against the center of 6 small central rocker arms (note that the central cam actuates the push rods via these 6 small rocker arms). In this position the valve push rods are not moved just like a child sitting in the center of a see saw does not move up and down. Now, rotate the ring and the ends of the push rods move along the lengths of the small rocker arms to reciprocate back and forth with an amplitude that changes with the control rod position - and with a frequency a function of cam timing. So, one can just bump the valves open to let in a tiny charge of steam, or one can force the ring over completely and allow the cam to open the valves for a long period and let in a lot more steam for more torque. Also, the cam allows up to 33" cutoff with zero advance while the engine is at rest to allow for starting the engine from rest (direct drive - no clutch or transmission), and the engine reverses by rotating the ring 30 degrees to change valve timing. ----- Actual compression ratio is approaching 30:1. Also relevant is the geometry of the spider bearing. The pistons do not take a sinusoidal path. Rather, the piston dwells near top dead center for a longer period because the connecting rod at the bearing literally pivots at the top and bottom of the strokes. This buys time for pressurizing the cylinder and provides higher mean effective pressure and expansion for higher efficiency. There is also the reheat tube - most of the compression volume is the reheat tube placed in the furnace next to the injector where temperature is maximum. The reheat allows peak steam temperatures to exceed 1400F despite the steam in the primary heat exchanger maintained at 1150-1200F, and the length of the tube is tuned to optimize heat transfer during operation by setting up a standing wave at higher engine speeds corresponding to highway driving where optimal efficiency is more important. However, the efficiency does not vary significantly over the power range partly due to the physics of the uniflow expander and the heat regeneration of the system - city mileage will be better than highway for these reasons along with the lack of idling of the engine. NOTE: There is additional compression volume added at low engine speeds, and a small valve shuts as the engine speed increases beyond about 600 rpm - this reduces compression at low engine speeds to avoid rough running. Engine efficiency is lower at these very low engine speeds, but this corresponds to a vehicle speed under 15 mph where high efficiency is not so important."

Not sure if any of the info will help you, but thought I'd put it out.
 
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Thanks for the info JP very interesting, nice to know what others are doing.
brian.
 
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Next stage was to make the jig base the centre hole for the spigot and the 90mm register are machined without altering the setting to ensure concentricity
the photo shows the adaptor ring in place.


To ensure radial position is maintained so 0° is always in the same place I made a set of T nuts to fit the rotary table without any slop so the jig cannot move
radially.

P1013119.JPG




P1013120.JPG


Slowly Slowly Brian.
 
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Great work Brian. As I said, the slightest mistake here and all goes wrong. That's close enough will not work here. Misalignment here will throw everything off later. Sloooow is the only way.

"Billy G"
 
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Hi Billy
You are so right , I am trying to address the problems before they arrive. the design of this radial is so different to the single cylinder natural gas engine
in that design room was made to accommodate errors that may be made by first time builders, but this one just has to be right first time , and the jigs will go a long way to ensure that accuracy is maintained.
I have ordered a Co Axial indicator for the mill so that will help.
Still a long way to go before the first chips for the engine are made. but the time spent preparing will be well worth the effort.
Brian.
 
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The jigs are now complete the second jig takes the cylinders or the heads. both jigs fit the lathe and rotary table.





P1013133.JPG P1013132.JPG P1013135.JPG

Slowly slowly Brian.
 

mike837go

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OHC Radial....Kewl.

From an amateur mechanic: The length of unsupported timing belt will be a problem. A tensioner on one side will definitely help. But, I suspect you'll need a fixed idler on the other side to keep the belt from tearing itself up against the covers.

Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome is near where I live and I have visited there several times. They still fly WWI era restored and replica aircraft. The early radials not only spun the cylinders with the crankshaft firmly bolted to the firewall, they were often two-stroke, using caster oil mixed with the gasoline.
 
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Thanks for your comments Mike, I have always wanted to go to Rhinebeck, I know the artist that designs the poster's etc.
 

mike837go

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When you find yourself on this side of The Pond, check their schedule. They run shows several times a year and the museum is open most weekends during the more clement months.

I've spent wayyyy too many hours in that hanger...
 
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At last I have ordered the material for the cylinders so a start can be made.
I think that asking the 7x12 to cut all the fins with a parting tool is a bit OTT so I have ordered a slitting saw and will cut them on the mill
So things are on the way heads down for a long haul. I look forward to your comments.
Brian.
 

Dataporter

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What material are you using for the cylinders, Brian?
Will you use a rotary table to cut the fins on the mill?
Why not use the slitting saw on the lathe in place of a parting or grooving tool?

BTW I have 90% of the materials needed to make the Dark Lady... Now I just have to find the time!
 
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Hi Dave
the material is EN1A (low carbon steel) but my suppler is trying to get me leaded steel Its the best for easy cutting.
I will be using the RT, and the jigs I made, to cut the fins. I can see what I am doing better on the mill as its nearly at eye level.

While I wait for the material I am working on the design for a triggered strobe light to dynamically balance the rotating mass,
Not easy for me as my electronics knowledge is of the stone age.
Brian.
 
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At last the material is on it's way Possibly next Thursday will see it on the bench. The material for the cylinders and the heads I just cant wait.
I have not been idle during this time The pay pal has been working overtime acquiring the tools required. an I have spent countless hours
getting the drawings up to scratch. the final refinements to ensure that the engine can assembled and things don't interfere with each other.
I am now up to my armpits is drawings, It looks as though the final revision will be like this.
img172.jpg
Well not quite but you get the idea, what's 90° between friends, Just longing to get started .

Brian.
 
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It's arrived now the real work starts, that's the winter taken care of, it's Shop time. :)
Brian.
P1013173.JPG
 
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So it's time to make a start and try out the jigs, first the spigot has to be turned ad a hole for the draw bar drilled. the base flange was also cut. oversize to provide a good location.

P1013178.JPG

The blank was then moved to the mill and set in the jig to have the retaining bolt holes drilled
see picture below I somehow missed it out must be out of practice.

The cooling fins can then be cut.

P1013180.JPG

The jig was then moved to the lathe to rough bore .

P1013183.JPG

And the fins given a taper.

P1013184.JPG

That's all for now. Brian. P1013179.JPG
 
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Dataporter

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Hi Brian, looks like you are having fun!! I've got to get back in my shop. I have nearly all the materials for my Dark Lady clock . (BTW, I bought the plans from Brian). I just haven't found the time...

That's a great way to cut the cooling fin grooves! I have to remember that.

Keep those chips flying!
Dave
 
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Five cylinders ready for final boring to size and a bit of spit and polish.
P1013202.JPG

Brian.
 
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The cylinders will be put to one side for now while I wait for the hone to arrive in the post.
Meanwhile I am going over the drawings for the heads yet again to ensure all is OK before starting to make chips.
This is the job that gives me the twitches, so many dimensions and angles.
Slowly --Slowly. Brian.
 

wrmiller

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As usual Brian, very, very nice work. I'm camped on both this and Bill's rail gun thread. These threads should be required reading for those who like to rag on 'import' machines. ;)
 
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Thanks for the nice comments Bill I am happy to have you along for the ride.

The next stage is to form the combustion chamber. this is a right ------ to get the radius correct and still hold the diameter and depth
but one down four to go.
P1013214.JPG

Brian.
 
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