Ford 300 inline six cylinder engine

Si Edwards

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This engine is a fantastic inspiration to me and I'm sure many others here, as well as browsing guests. Thanks so much for providing this in such detail. These engineering skills are being lost, but such a high standard set by this build shows a younger cnc generation what used and can still be done.

its great!

cheers

Si ....
 

Pitchfire

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Thanks for the background. It was certainly not meant as a challenge. What I see is Michelangelo at work and I guess it's rather the lament that the forum is somewhat limited compared to the possibilities that I feel should exist. I envy the hell out of your (obviously) hard earned talent.

I love the I6 and have a personal history with it as well.

I am curious if you have plans/schematics for the carburetor or something similar? I've searched a bit for such a thing but not been able to find much.

Greatly looking forward to seeing this one run (the 302 was cool, do you have plans on putting it to work?).
 

gbritnell

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Hi pitchfire
l have drawings of the carb for this engine and others. Tell me what you need and I will see if I have one to suit.
gbritnell
 

Pitchfire

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I don't have a specific need right now. It is a generalized question I have had for some time. I have seen very basic gas vapor units but this is the first simple carburetor I have seen (maybe I just don't get out enough or to the right places). I would like to do a model engine with my sons soon, just haven't really narrowed it down at all yet.
 

gbritnell

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Hi Pitchfire,
Let me know when you're ready and I'll find you one that will be best for what you're building.
gbritnell
 

george wilson

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Only those who have done this type of model work can realize the enormous dedication,time,and craftsmanship that go into such work. And with manual machines!!
 

gbritnell

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Gentlemen,
The point was reached where everything was machined except for a few small parts and some additions so the engine was completely disassembled for the final work. When I originally made the crankshaft I didn't know exactly how I was going to mount the flywheel so keyways needed to be cut, front and rear. I utilized the fixture that I had made when the crank was first machined. The keyways were cut using a .062 Woodruff key cutter but for putting in a straight key. The other operation was to drill and tap the front end of the crank for a pulley retaining bolt.
gbritnell

- - - Updated - - -

With the crank finished I turned my attention to the block. A couple of drilled and tapped holes were needed along with a couple of vent holes in the lifter cavity. On my 4 cylinder engine I have a crankcase vent mounted to the side wall of the block but for this engine I wanted it to be through the rocker cover cap so that required drilling 2 vent holes so any excess crankcase pressure would exit up through the lifter cavity and then up through the pushrod holes and out the vent cap in the rocker cover.
gbritnell

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gbritnell

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The biggest part of the final machining was to move the dipstick hole. I never did a complete drawing layout of the position when I first drew up the engine and I found that when I made the oil dipstick it interfered with one of the crankshaft counterweights. What to do? I could just use a dummy dipstick, plug it and not use it at all which would leave me no way of checking the oil level or moving the boss. With all the work it took to build the engine it seemed like the last one was the only option.
The original boss would need to be machined off and a patch made to cover that hole and provide material to make the new boss. I did a drawing layout of the area and with a wall thickness of .062 I split that into a .031 depth patch. The only catch was the patch would have a step on both the front and back sides. I set up the block and machined the patch area out and drilled and tapped 0-80 holes in the corners to secure the patch. The patch was then machined leaving excess stock on the actual boss so that I could clamp this in the vise to machine the back side of the patch. This would later be cut down when the boss was developed.
gbritnell

- - - Updated - - -

The mounting screws were turned and threaded leaving a reduced area near the head. When the screws were turned tight they were then twisted and bent until they broke off at the reduced area. I have found this to be and easier way than making the screws, cutting them off, mounting in a fixture to slot the heads and then eventually cutting the slotted area off anyway.
The patch was filed and fitted tightly into the cavity and screwed home. The block was then set up and the boss was shaped and the last couple of thousands of stock machined off. I had to set up my angle table to put the dipstick hole in at 30 degrees. Once the machining was done the boss and patch were filed and polished.
gbritnell

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mgalusha

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Moving the boss, something that I shudder to think about and you mange to make it look seamless, terrific. Really enjoying watching your progress on this project.
 

cjtoombs

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Wow, great job. I always liked that motor, I hot-rodded a Chevy 250 inline 6 back in the day, and had a lot of fun with it, but the ford was bigger and has a much better cylinder head design, but I didn't have a ford car to put one in. I read somewhere that there was a guy racing them that would cut two 351C heads off and weld them together to run on a 300 6. Fun stuff.
 

Barnesrickw

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Best F150 engine ever. You could really pack the miles on those. Shame they quit making them.


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cjtoombs

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Best F150 engine ever. You could really pack the miles on those. Shame they quit making them.


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The only real problem they had is that they were really bad about wearing the front cylinder WAY more than the others. I worked in an automotive machine shop for 5 years right after I got out of high school, and saw many of these come through the shop. Many were worn so badly on the front cylinder that they had to be bored .060 from standard. I even saw a couple that had to be sleeved. The Chevrolets had the same problem, just not as severe. I think it was caused by the location of the water pump, which would have caused temperature variations on that the front cylinder. But I agree, they were a good truck motor. I lived in rice country, and they used these and the Chevrolet 292 6 cylinders extensively for ag irrigation pumps. We put hardened seats and valves in them, and they ran them on propane. They usually lasted 3 seasons or so, then they would come back for a rebuild on the heads. They were as clean after 3 years as the day they were put together, propane doesn't sludge them up like gasoline did. Ah, fun times...
 

Barnesrickw

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My first car was a '76 Granada. Stop laughing. With a 250 straight six. Think I sold it running with 250k on it. Back in 1986. Slow, but got me everywhere. Trunk fit a lot of beer. Good times.


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cjtoombs

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Gbritnell,
Hows it comming? You know, once you get it done, you will need to build a scale F100 to put it in :).
 

gbritnell

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The engine is finished as far as machining goes. After the patch was complete the engine was cleaned and reassemble, spark plug wires were made, oil put in and timing set for a trial run and that's when the Ohio weather took a turn for the worse. I just didn't feel like going out into the cold garage to try and start it. Today's weather is much better and the weekend looks very promising so I think Saturday will be the day for the test run. I'll keep everyone posted.
In the mean time here's some pictures of the finished engine.
gbritnell

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cjtoombs

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Are you going to take it to NAMES? I'd like to see it run.
 

gbritnell

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I'll be at NAMES with the engine running or not. The plan is to get out in the garage today and tomorrow to fire it up and fine tune it. As has been my experiences in the past once you get to this point almost anything can happen. My biggest concern is the small spark plugs running on gas but then Steve Huck used them in his V-8 with no trouble.
Thanks to everyone for following along.
gbritnell
 

wagnmkr

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This is indeed a masterpiece. I can't wait to hear it run.

Thanks for the excellent build thread.

Cheers,

Tom
 

gbritnell

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Gentlemen,
The engine is running. Having been away for almost 5 weeks I was in a rush to get it running for the NAMES show but that didn't happen. My apologies to those fellows that came to the show to see it running. This is the second running. I fired it up earlier in the week but had a few adjustment and modifications to make.
It seems like the air bleed hole in the carb needs to be a little bigger because it takes too much adjustment on the main needle to go from idle to high speed.
So far everything seems to be working well. It looks like it will need a different seal in the timing cover because it leaks a little.
Here's the link to the Youtube video.
http://youtu.be/tdrEHY3uqqs
gbritnell
 

mgalusha

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So cool to see this completed and running, just beautiful.

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34_40

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An amazing feet! Thanks so much for sharing the build.

In the video, it looks like number 1 plug was "leaking" voltage. How big is the coil you use?



Again, thanks for sharing your time and effort, I know I learn something each time I read one of your posts.
 

SonofHarold - Metal Carver

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Just surfing the site this morning and am TOTALLY blown away! I am not sure I would ever have the patients and the stick to it ivness to complete a project of that depth! I am recently retired and in the process of getting my "shop" set and hoping to start some learning projects this winter. Right now I am just hoping to build a reasonable good running air/steam engine in the near future. This is indeed inspirational - KuDus to you sir! and Thanks!
A note on the engine if I may. I learned to drive in my Mom's 68 Mustang with the 200ci version of this engine and I can tell you I abused that engine a lot. It is one tough. and I would have to say indestructible. engine. As an example doing power shifts ( never pulling your foot of the gas at full throttle) and missing the shift, more than once. Gawd I wish I still had that car!
 

JPigg55

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Beautiful work, reminded me of the first new truck I ever purchased. A 1990 F-150 4X4 with the aforementioned 300 inline six.
What an engine. If I remember correctly, it had almost as much HP as the 302 V8 engine with more torque.
Damn thing was almost bulletproof. I had almost 300k miles on it when my son wrecked it.

Friend of mine at work back then had a van with the same engine. He couldn't see buying a new vehicle as long as it was running.
He even tried to kill it, didn't ever change the oil or filter. It finally croaked after he ran it (on purpose) without any oil in it, Still ran for over a 100 miles before seizing up.
 

Janderso

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I just watched the video. Wow, wow, wow.
A very talented individual.
 

FOMOGO

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Simply amazing. The dedication of getting it right is not something you see much these days. My Blue Oval hat is off to you sir. Cheers, Mike
 

Chris Hamel

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I own a '93 f150 with the 300 engine, so it is really cool to see your creation. I am in awe.
 

Jubil

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As we say here in East Texas, "dadgummit I wish I could do that".
Amazing !!!!

Chuck
 

MikeInOr

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Very incredible build!

Which makes me very sorry to say... it looks more like a 240 straight six to me. ;)
 
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