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Ford 300 inline six cylinder engine

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john.k

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I thought the 240 and 300 had the same block and outside appearance......I bought a D series once with a 240 and 8sp suitcase box........had a lazy,so 21 ton gross...wasnt a ball of fire,lot of time in low range.
 

cjtoombs

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I thought the 240 and 300 had the same block and outside appearance......I bought a D series once with a 240 and 8sp suitcase box........had a lazy,so 21 ton gross...wasnt a ball of fire,lot of time in low range.
I believe the only difference between the 240 and 300 was the crankshaft (stroke) and rod length. Externally they were identical. The 240s tended to be in earlier vehicles, I think Ford decided to up the cubes on the engine somewhere around 67 or 68. The only real problem they had is that they tended to wear the front cylinder badly. This happened to Chevrolet inline 6's as well, but not to such an extent. I think the water pump location on them caused uneven heating on the front cylinder, leading to the extreme wear. I worked in an automotive machine shop from 86-91 and we bored many of these engines. Often, the engine would have to go .060 over, only to clean up the front cylinder. I think we sleeved a few of the front cylinders as well, all the other cylinders would clean up at .030. I've always wanted to hot rod one of those motors, maybe in a Model A.
 

MikeInOr

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I believe the only difference between the 240 and 300 was the crankshaft (stroke) and rod length. Externally they were identical. The 240s tended to be in earlier vehicles, I think Ford decided to up the cubes on the engine somewhere around 67 or 68. The only real problem they had is that they tended to wear the front cylinder badly. This happened to Chevrolet inline 6's as well, but not to such an extent. I think the water pump location on them caused uneven heating on the front cylinder, leading to the extreme wear. I worked in an automotive machine shop from 86-91 and we bored many of these engines. Often, the engine would have to go .060 over, only to clean up the front cylinder. I think we sleeved a few of the front cylinders as well, all the other cylinders would clean up at .030. I've always wanted to hot rod one of those motors, maybe in a Model A.

Yep, pretty much impossible to tell a 240 from a 300 by looking at it. It was a joke! :)
 
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