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BtoVin83

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#1
This is what frustrates me about the Chinese tools. It takes a fair amount of know how to be able to make a functional tool and by and large the Chinese do OK, that is until you get to the easy stuff. Drilling and tapping the mounting hole in the cross slide nut should be beginners stuff and that is probably exactly who did the job, a beginner
. 20181204_111416.jpg
 

pontiac428

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#2
It's bad enough that the part was made that way, but it's even worse that more hands touched it on the assembly line and on final inspection. At least you can drink until it looks straight.
 

BtoVin83

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#3
That's a lot of Jack Daniels
 

BtoVin83

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#4
After some thought I must apologize for assuming this was caused by a beginner, that's an affront to all the beginners on this site who are trying to figure this hobby out and do good work. We've all made mistakes but the difference is that after making an error you realize it and correct it. This doofus probably doesn't think there was anything wrong with it.
 

RJSakowski

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#5
Final inspection probably wouldn't catch something like that. By the time it gets that far, the machine is fully assembled and the defective part is hidden from view. The inspector would at best operate the cross slide and find it working. In fact, the bias might even improve the operation by removing some backlash. Chinese workers have apparently not been trained to do in-process inspections. Or it may be that they are working piecework and paid according to the number of operations completed in an hour. Removing a defective part and replacing it with a new part would cut into the production.

Part of the blame has to rest on the shoulders of the importers. Grizzly and Tormach, to name a few have all brought equipment with hidden defects into the country. They claim to have quality control inspectors working in both the country of manufacture and stateside but defects keep getting past them. I have machines from both Tormach and Grizzly and have found manufacturing flaws in every machine purchased from them. None of the machines were inspected stateside.

This problem isn't exclusive to Asian machines. Made in USA doesn't guarantee quality. The quest for squeezing every last nickle out of production costs takes its toll. There was a time when a workman would sign his name with pride on his work. That doesn't exist any more. ISO9000 makes an attempt to solve these problems with its continuous quality improvement philosophy and if practiced properly, would do so but often the manufacturer's objective is to pass the audit and get the certification.

When a new home is built, building inspectors inspect at every step of the way rather than coming into the completed home and stamping "Approved" on the final sign off. This is done to uncover defects that would otherwise be hidden by following work. The same should be done in factories at all steps where further assembly would hide a defect. Workers would be trained to inspect the parts that they are using and reject those not meeting standards. It would add cost to the production but when weighed against the cost of dealing with returned goods and lost customers, probably be a wash.
 

middle.road

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#6
There was a builder here in the Knoxville area that would have his crews rip out the insulation from one house after inspection and go stuff it into the next house while the drywall gang was hanging sheet.
To read over the lawsuits is hilarious.

It's a price point on imported machinery, one just has to figure on some 'tweaking' (rebuilding?) after you get it.
 

rgray

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#7
Have to wonder how many got made that way before they made a correction. Hopefully there has been a correction! never know.
 

savarin

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#8
We often talk about how true craftsmen built all the old stuff.
If you ever have to re-upholster an antique chair you wont believe the bodge ups in the carpentry.
The webbing and upholstery is often all that held it together not the joinery.
 

mmcmdl

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#9
It's bad enough that the part was made that way, but it's even worse that more hands touched it on the assembly line and on final inspection. At least you can drink until it looks straight.
Hmmmmmm…………………….looks straight to me ! o_O
 

Suzuki4evr

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#10
After some thought I must apologize for assuming this was caused by a beginner, that's an affront to all the beginners on this site who are trying to figure this hobby out and do good work. We've all made mistakes but the difference is that after making an error you realize it and correct it. This doofus probably doesn't think there was anything wrong with it.
Some people just doesn't have work pride. Even if you work for an employer, you must have work pride and remember your NAME is attached to that workpiece.
 

Boswell

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#11
Only one person can control the quality of the work that is done and that is the person doing the work. All the QC inspectors, managers, testers etc can only, at best, detect poor quality work after it has been performed.
 

C-Bag

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#12
I can say firsthand it's not just the Chinese. The two manufacturing plants I worked in were more worried about getting it out the door working ok than being truly right. I was pretty universally resented by fab, machine and management. But any time there was something critical I was on the short list. Management barely acknowledged that I had no comebacks and never commented about my work only to say that I was slow.

And even though it was obvious who was doing the crappy work because there was a paper trail nothing was ever done because these individuals had been there a long time and appeared to work fast. They rushed about always yelling at the guys under them and berated them constantly. Luckily I never had to work under them but I had to go out in the field all the time to fix their crap work. Now in an environment like that where's the incentive to good work? It is neither rewarded nor acknowledged. Ever notice how on TV and movies all the time now doing something horrible to somebody is always with the preamble "it's not personal, it's only business"? Being forced to do crappy work because it was made wrong or engineered wrong felt personal to me. It's why I don't do that work anymore.
 

mmcmdl

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#13
" We know it isn't right , but that's the way we do it " !! :grin: Yeah , hear it all the time , and I'm the knumnut who has to fix it in the end . :rolleyes:
 

amsoilman

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#14
I had a young man come to my office 25 years ago and told me he wanted to be a Carpenter. To this day he is still the slowest man out there but all of his work is perfect and he still working for me
 

magicniner

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#15
Have to wonder how many got made that way before they made a correction. Hopefully there has been a correction! never know.
Unlikely, what you see is the result of the importer chipping the price below that which will buy decent production and hence the manufacturer farming stuff out to the lowest bidder to try to make a living.
The importer expects to make a fat profit on the sale so you don't see how cheaply the machine was actually made.
 

P. Waller

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#16
It's bad enough that the part was made that way, but it's even worse that more hands touched it on the assembly line and on final inspection. At least you can drink until it looks straight.
What makes you think that there is a "final inspection"?
 

warrjon

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#17
Bit off the subject but good a good view/read

Anyone heard of William Edwards Deming? Check out his Red bead experiment. I have worked for a couple of multinational companies IBM for one and this is exactly how they operate.


At the bottom of overview just before Family there is a quick story of Ford/Mazda transmissions. The Japanese used Demings quality philosophy Ford did not.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._Edwards_Deming
 
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