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G0704 handwheel scales won't stay put

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Suburban

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#1
Now, both of my x-table handwheels have scales that move when I just turn the handle, so they are completely unreliable. There appears to be no way to lock them in place. Is there a way to fix this? Is something assembled wrong?
 

Karl_T

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#2
Most all scales have a thumb screw someplace to tighten. You loosen it to set the number you want, then re tighten.

If you can't find it, take a bunch of pics/

Also try to take it apart to find the issue
 

Cadillac

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#3
Some have a pc of spring steel bent like a V. Just puts tension on dial. If slipping best bet is to drill and tap a hole. Then make yourself a nice knurled lockscrew.
 

pdentrem

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#4
Per the parts manual there are some flat curved springs to set the tension. Item 39 and 59. May require more tension or they moved out of position. Many have installed wavy washers known as Belleville Washer when possible. It will put some tension on the scale and still allow to be rotated to a set number.

http://cdn1.grizzly.com/partslists/g0704_pl.pdf
 

BaronJ

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#5
Hi Guys,

A lot of machines use these wavy spring washers to apply tension to the dials. They can sometimes become quite loose particularly if they rely on the backlash adjustment to control the distance between the dial and handle surfaces. This gets worse over time. If the backlash is correct, then adding another spring washer or just adding a few thou of shim on the fixed side can help.
 

Suburban

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Per the parts manual there are some flat curved springs to set the tension. Item 39 and 59. May require more tension or they moved out of position. Many have installed wavy washers known as Belleville Washer when possible. It will put some tension on the scale and still allow to be rotated to a set number.
Indeed.

Took a handwheel apart, and tried adding more tension to the Part# 39 spring, but by the time I got it back together it was just as bad as before, maybe worse. I tried this a couple times. Kind of a poor design, IMO. Will have to look into getting a Belleville washer linear wave spring that fits, or perhaps just drilling and tapping the scale ring for a set screw.
 
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pdentrem

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#7
Use a brass or soft tip set screw to not mar the running surface of the scale. This is to avoid a stiff spot due to a raised area from the set screw.
 

Suburban

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#8
Use a brass or soft tip set screw to not mar the running surface of the scale. This is to avoid a stiff spot due to a raised area from the set screw.
10-4, understood.
The handwheel seems to be aluminum, and might be a machined casting at that. A nylon-tip screw should do the job, I think.
 

RJSakowski

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#9
I have the same type of dials on my G0602 lathe. The cross feed dial was slipping like your dials. As I recall, the problem was insufficient axial clearance of the dial. I reduced the the thickness of the dial and haven't had a problem since.

You may be able to accomplish the same by adding a thin shim washer between the thrust washer and the crank. It shouldn't take much, only a few thousandths will probably create the necessary clearance. An aluminum can should work. If you sandwich the aluminum between two pieces of scrap, you can drill or use an end mill to make the inner hole. Trim the outside diameter with scissors.
 
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