[4]

Glossy Finish for Brass?

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

Ray C

Platinum
Staff member
Registered
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
All,

I'm making some small decorative containers from brass. The lathe finish is beautifully glossy then I follow-up with bead blasting to give a nice sparkle appearance. I'd like to spray or brush some clearcoat finish to prevent the brass from oxidizing. Can anyone recommend a proper coating that's reasonably tough and long lasting?

These are decorative and not for containing food or beverage so toxicity issues in that regard are not a major concern.

Thanks

Ray
 

Almega

Active User
Registered
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Messages
62
Krylon makes a product for exterior metal coating that is clear that should be very adequate for your pieces, keeping them looking shiny and new without tarnish. If they are not handled, the finish should last for a long time without any apparent tarnish. Got any pictures of your work?
 

Tony Wells

Platinum
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
7,069
I use an aerosol polyurethane that holds up very well, even with handling. I believe Krylon makes it.
 

mikey

Active User
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
5,661
Ray, take a look at Everbrite: http://www.everbrite.net/

Good stuff. You can brush/spray/wipe it on and it will keep brass from oxidizing or tarnishing for years.
 

RandyM

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
Staff member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 12, 2011
Messages
2,358
My coating of preference would clear powder. Be careful and do a heat test first. I have noticed a change in color in some materials once the item is heated. You may or may not like the color change.

Here is a pic of a brass pipe with clear powder and the top lid is clear powder on aluminum. The jar rods are clear powder and the brass pump nozzle is clear powder.

Drain.JPG Jar.JPG Nozzle & Handle.JPG
 
Last edited:

PurpLev

Active User
Registered
Joined
Feb 22, 2012
Messages
888
My coating of preference would clear powder. Be careful and do a heat test first. I have noticed a change in color in some materials once the item is heated. You may or may not like the color change.

Here is a pic of a brass pipe with clear powder and the top lid is clear powder on aluminum. The jar rods are clear powder and the brass pump nozzle is clear powder.
that is spanking awesome finish Randy
 

iron man

Active User
Registered
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
792
On my ex-bosses antique cars we use to use clear laquer it lays flat and has a tighter molecular structure over enamal if you can even buy it anymore.. Ray
 

Tony Wells

Platinum
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
7,069
Ray, I use spray lacquer on old radio wooden cases. I get it at Lowe's. Valspar still makes it in Satin or High Gloss.
 

Ray C

Platinum
Staff member
Registered
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Thanks Guys...

Randy... -That's the look I'm after.

BTW: Hope this isn't too morbid or contrary to anyone's religious beliefs but, I'm making ash urns for the direct children of my Mother In Law. Right now, I'm sketching out some designs and doing some experimental finish work and if there are no objections, will show them here (prior to filling them).


Ray
 

Ray C

Platinum
Staff member
Registered
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
OK, finally got a start on the "containers"...

The outer cylinder is bronze. Here's an intermediate pass for boring it out. It's beautiful to work with and the final finish (not shown) was a joy to look at and feel. I've never worked with bronze before but work on brass occasionally. It's very similar and cuts w/o deflection unlike low carbon steel. If you dial-in 10 thou, you get a 10 thou cut. The insert here is carbide taken from the jar of wayward inserts and smoothed-out with a green wheel. It gave an outstanding final finish.

Urn Cylinder Bore.JPG

Here's the start of some temporary caps made of mild steel. I'll put center holes on the outside and fit the caps on the ends of the cylinder so I can spin between centers to cut the outer surface of the bronze cylinder. The caps will go in no deeper than the intended inside thread of the cylinder and will be a tight fit. One of the caps will be long enough to clamp in the dog. These gyrations are necessary because the finish would get ruined by any kind of jaw contact -even soft jaws would leave a visible impression. Here I'm just breaking the corners of the cap.


Temp End Caps.JPG

That's it for today...

Ray

Urn Cylinder Bore.JPG Temp End Caps.JPG
 
[5] [7]
Top