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Gorton 9-J inherited from my dad

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firstturn

Swarf
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#1
I am new here as you can see. When my dad passed away recently, among the normal things that one leaves behind, he also left a Gorton 9-J milling machine. According to the build plate, it was manufactured in 1969. He has owned it as long as I can recall and during that time I really don't think he used it much at all. Honestly I don't have the room for it and am looking to sell it, this is where my dilemma arrises, I don't really know what it is worth. I had a guy offer me $500 for it this week, but it seems like it might be worth more. If it is not then fine, but I'd like to have a better idea.

Would anyone here be able to give me a ball park of what this machine might be worth/what I should ask for it?

He also left a Max Cut (Maxcut-4) lathe that I think I will likely keep.

Appreciate the help anyone can give this newbie.

image.jpg
 

samthedog

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#2
My opinion (for what it is worth), is that you should also make room to keep the mill. If you are going to have a lathe then the mill will complement it. The Gorton milling machines were very well built and in my opinion, head and shoulders over a Bridgeport. If you tuck it into a corner, it will take up minimal floor space. You can always mount it on wheels and then it can be rolled around the garage or shop keeping it out of the way until needed.

If you have your heart set on selling it, then $500 is too low in my opinion. A member here who has the name Senna knows more about Gorton machines than most and will likely be able to give you more precise information regarding is worth. Extra pictures would help that clearly show the condition of the table and ways plus any extra equipment.

Regards.
 

pineyfolks

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#3
$500 is to cheap, you can't buy a mini mill for that! I would keep it. I kept my dads little Rotex mill and it saved me from tearing my Bridgeport down to do a simple job many times. You'll never buy another for the price you sell it for. I'd be making room for it, but then again I'm into old iron.
 

LEEQ

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#4
plus one on keep it, it complements the lathe. They will always remind you of your Dad, too. Cool tools, congrats.
 

Thomas Paine

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Gorton is pretty top shelf. I assume you have all the tooling? i think it's a B&S 10 taper. at least $1000 in California, maybe more depending on what tooling you have included. I would assume it's a mid 30's 40's build.

- - - Updated - - -

I think they came standard with x and y power feed. Does it have a Z power feed? that was an extra option.

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hey, i found a 9-J catalog from 1934, check it out, (man, i love the internet!):

print it out and keep it with the machine.

link here
 

firstturn

Swarf
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#6
Thanks guys. Two car California garages are not exactly roomy so I am afraid keeping it would be very challenging, but will give it some consideration. Mostly wanted to make sure we weren't being low balled.
 

Thomas Paine

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#7
two car garage! some of us here haul 3000lb machines deep into the depths of their darkest basements, just so they can make and modify things to create their next creation after creation.

sounds weird i know, but it may be your only opportunity to spend some quality time with one, sleep on it for a few days, and park your car on the curb. :)
 

LEEQ

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#8
My Bridgeport is off in the corner of the basement. Doesn't take up much room sitting 45 degrees in the corner and you still have access to your handwheels. I set it up there just to see, and I probably wouldn't set it up any other way. As far as dollar value, the condition of your ways would be my biggest consideration if buying your mill. Sounds like it spent decades with little wear. If it was new or in good tight shape when he bought it, it should be worth that $1000 easy. Good luck either way.
 

Scruffy

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#9
I bought a 9-j a while back and really love it. Big ,heavy, and ridgid. If you keep it don't let anyone talk you into redoing the spindle . You can find everything you need in b&s 10.

1000 is to cheap if it's in usable condition. Go for 1500.00 or more.

Thanks scruffy
 
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Senna

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#10
Been busy and just now saw this.

That looks like a standard Gorton 9J mill. Looks like all the feeds are manual including quill down feed.
The 9J is a bull of a machine with uncommon accuracy, precision, rigidity, and quality. You can take stupid big cuts and it'll take it all day but the quality is so good you can use it the rest of the week as a jig borer.
The quill is a full 4" in diameter and with only 3.5" of quill travel that huge quill is always well supported by that equally huge head. George Gorton even thought that his flagship mill ought to have an anti backlash mechanism on the spindle to assure better bored holes.
Compared to the rest of the mill, the tables on these are a bit small. You have about 24" of X travel, 12.5 in Y, and the knee has about 14.
Most were fitted with 2 speed motors.
Scruffy nailed it about the B&S 10 tooling too. You can find just about anything you need without much difficulty. Besides that the B&S 10 is a very stout shank. Much more positive and rigid than the ubiquitous R-8.

These big Gorton mills are really great machines and because they are relatively unknown to the masses the low prices they fetch right now make these an unbelievable value.

If you really do wish to sell this mill you can start at $1500 or so but being completely manual you might have to sit on it a while. $500 cash isn't an insult and I'm thinking the final sale price will be closer to $500 than to $1500.

They are WORTH so much more!
 

David M

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IMG_1807.JPG I didn't really have room for this either, but for $500 I thought it was too good a deal to pass up. Now I wonder how I ever got along without it. Mine is a B&S 9 taper. full collet sets are available new and other tooling is out there, just have to look a little.

IMG_1807.JPG
 
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