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[4]

Hardinge Hlv (early Model - Ca 1950 - S/n 102) Restoration

January Project of the Month [3]
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mmcgirr

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#1
Howdy,

In an effort to provide photographic (and possibly video - still learning to do that) record of the teardown and rebuild of an early HLV lathe, I'm going to devote a thread to my particular model. Note that my particular machine is so early, that it does not have an oiling system for the carriage, etc. Only oiling bungs (for point of reference).

The plan is roughly as follows:
1) teardown and decrustify the machine, and
2) rework, repaint and rebuild the machine to as close to factory spec as possible.

Unfortunately, I'm not really sure what the "factory spec" was for this machine, as real documentation is very scarce - whereas the HLV-H has pretty solid docs. So, I'm mostly going to shoot from the hip, and if you all have info please do share so I can build a library as comprehensive as possible.

I am going to take as many photos as possible during the course of this endeavor, which will probably last at least a couple months, if not more (depending on funds and what needs to be done).

Hopefully, by the end of it all, I'll be able to provide information on a machine which I've been unable to find a lot of documentation on - especially since it's one of the first (by my current knowledge, actually the third ever made) HLV lathes.

If you have any specific requests for things to see to help out in your HLV travels, please do let me know, and I'll do my best to accommodate via pictures. As a rule, I'm using the HLV-H maintenance manual, but I've already found some significant deviations from said manual, and I'll do my best to make note of them where applicable.

I'll start off with initial condition photos in the following posts, but for now, an overview (which I've posted elsewhere). I started with an initial thread in the bridgeport forum (as I also acquired one of those when I got this machine), but a couple of things lead me to separate them:
1) There really is a lack of information on this particular type (HLV) and vintage (very early) online
1a) All the manuals I've found are for newer HLVs (mid 1950's and up) or for the HLV-H (1960 and up). Mine is a strange beast
1b) She's extremely crusty and varnished, which leads to interesting exercises in disassembly
1c) I don't always have the proper tools, which leads to further interesting exercises in disassembly, we'll either fab up or hack our way around that
2) There is no support from Hardinge for this lathe, unlike the HLV-H.
3) I'm trying to restore the old girl to glory as cheaply as possible
4) My memory is terrible, so pictures help enormously - both now and in the future.

Pardon the kind of scattershot way I'm going about this, as this is my first real "major" project of this type, so I'm still wrapping my noodle around it and trying to figure out the best way to organize it all. If any of you have recommendations for better ways to approach it, let me know!

Regards,
Mike

An overview set:

overview 1.jpg

Tailstock Assembly (2).jpg

Cross and Compound Components (3).jpg

Cross and Compound Components (9).jpg

Cross and Compound Components (10).jpg
 

mmcgirr

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#2
First things first - teardown and cleaning.

For background, I'm the second owner of this machine. It was bought, as far as I know, brand new by the previous owner in 1950. It was used as a secondary machine in a manufacturing facility shop - along with my bridgeport, and regretfully next to a grinding / wire wheel assembly.

Further, lubrication was not appropriate, and maintenance was less than stellar - so the cleanup and restoration is going to be exciting.

The first thing I did was evaluate the overall condition, as follows:

The machine was under power (240VAC, 3phase 20A supply) at the time of removal. At that time, it was reasonably smooth from a spindle perspective (thankfully). However, age and lack of maintenance have taken their toll on the machine.

The belts will certainly need to be replaced (the spindle belt is still a bit of a mystery to me, as I'm not sure if mine is one of the ones that needs to have the spindle popped to remove the belt, or if it's one of the ones that require the factory to do it - they don't support it due to age, and I can't afford it anyway, so we'll make it work no matter what).

The bedway has some dings near the headstock due to carelessness with the chucks and so forth, so at least some very light stoning will be required to rectify some humps, with a full bed grind at some point in the future being performed.

There is a "wonderful" coat of protective solidified varnished lubricant / unknown contaminants and detritus all over the thing, which will require creative use of solvents and degreasers to clean off. Funnily, the coolant sump had 8.5 13oz coffee cans worth of old chips (probably much older than me) still in it, as well as very dark, black-coffee looking fluid in it. I assume that a coolant pump teardown and rebuild will certainly be in order.

The gearbox probably hasn't seen lubrication since the Nixon administration, so that will require removal, evaluation and rectification. The gears themselves (in the apron and the gearbox) seem to be in good shape, but again the varnish strikes, causing things (like the 1,2,3 selector) to not turn so nice.

The carriage doesn't seem to get tight on the bedway anywhere, which is nice.

The power feed does still work, which is nice.

The brake shoe isn't even connected, and the cork is shot, which is not so nice.

The vari-speed assembly and motor mounting plate and assembly is different than any variety of HLV or HLV-H I've seen docs on, which is not so nice.

There is no pump oiling system for the carriage - which is terribly not nice, and perhaps some homebrew will happen to implement one. Further, the apron did not have enclosed lubrication like the HLV-H, which is also not so fun. Homebrew may be involved there as well.

The machine had provision and was originally supplied with: the collet closer, taper assembly, change gears, steady and follow rests and other attachments, but through the passage of time from the original owner to me, has regretfully seen the items likely go to scrap.

We will try to make them. I'd like to make her whole again.

If anyone has (or is willing to provide) dimensioned drawings for the accessories, I would be most appreciative. Otherwise, we'll figure out how to lash 'em up.

At some point I will probably DRO it out to make life easier and more fun. However for now it's dials all the way which are thankfully whole and in reasonably good shape.

New pictures:

Apron varnish (yay!), handles removed.

Apron - No Handles (1).jpg

Apron geartrain (gears in good shape):

Apron Internals (7).jpg

Please note that if you're trying to disassemble the apron face from the carriage on an older model HLV, that you have to separate the entire apron from the carriage prior to apron face removal (there is a gear in the way). If you're trying to utilize the HLV-H maintenance manual, it will not work the way they indicate as the construction is substantially different. Forewarned is forearmed!

To remove the apron from the carriage, you remove the 4 SHCS screws on the top of the carriage at the front, as well as the 2 SHCS set screws in the same row. Holes I'm talking about are here:

Carriage - No Apron - Apron Hole Locations.jpg

Apron backside - more varnish (yay!):

Apron Internals (9).jpg

Long and Cross Clutch cruft:

Longitudinal-Crossfeed Clutches (3).jpg

Carriage condition, varnish and way wear:

Carriage Crust and Way Condition (2).jpg

Here's why way wiper maintenance is important!

Carriage Crust and Way Condition (1).jpg

Part 2 of above:

Carriage Crust and Way Condition (6).jpg


As you can see, she's been rode semi-hard and put away very wet. We'll fix that up nice-like.

Regards,
Mike
 
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mmcgirr

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#3
Carriage power feed removal, pictures and wiring lash-up.

Bolts and dowels far side (dowel pins held in by nuts below and above SHCSs:

CarriageFeed Unit and Mounting (4).jpg

Bolt near side (and interior of power feed unit, showing lead screw and carriage stop rod mounts):

CarriageFeed Unit and Mounting (3).jpg

Machined surfaces of carriage power feed unit and lead-screw needle bearing/mount:

CarriageFeed Unit and Mounting (8).jpg

Carriage power feed overview:

CarriageFeed Unit and Mounting (9).jpg

Wiring (please note that I will trace these out and indicate their proper function to the panel or carriage feed motor at a later date):

Inputs:
Grey insulator:
Red->Red
Green->Red
White->Grey
Black->Grey​
CarriageFeed Wiring (3).jpg
White / Black individual leads:
White->Black (coded as white by me)
Black->Black​
CarriageFeed Wiring (6).jpg

Regards,
Mike
 

co1859

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#4
Hi Mike
Great project, love the pictures. I had to use Carb Cleaner and brass parts brush on my carriage gears and other raw metal areas with heavy varnish. Caution It will eat paint.
Ron
 
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EmilioG

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#5
Purple Power and Oil Eater work wonders and does not eat paint.
Orange solvent is also very good and non toxic.
Congrats on the Hardinge. Very cool looking old machine.
 

co1859

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#6
Oil Eater? first I have heard of it. I will have to get some and try it out, Thanks. If I find any HLV stuff I will pass it on to you.
 

Bob Korves

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#7
It sounds like you have your head around this project pretty well. I will remind you (and myself and others) of some of the important mindsets of this kind of restoration, to my way of thinking:

This is an very early evolutionary version of that series of innovative and top quality machines. Please don't make it into something it is not. Your machine is tangible, soon to be living, history.

It took many decades for this machine to get to where it is today. Taking weeks of letting a part soak to free something up is trivial if the big picture is kept in mind. There are always other details to work on while you wait. In the same spirit of "first cause no harm", there is absolutely no place for banging and forcing things, temper flares, or ever being in a hurry. Bring it back to life gently, caring for each part, bolt, and nut until it is properly correct. The secret is in the details, getting them right, even if not visible in the finished restoration.

Think long and hard before making ANY changes or modifications to get it running or to get it done. Then think about it some more...

Think even longer and harder yet about making any changes and modifications to make it more "modern." This is an iconic lathe, built before things like DROs were ever dreamed of. Adding one will not only scar the machine, but will also immediately turn it into a "hot rod" and not a historically accurate restoration. I, for one, think that hot rods are often OK for ordinary Chevys and Fords that were produced in huge quantities, and are not the third HLV off the line. Once you hot rod something, it loses much of its history, and there is no real going back...

My ideas, your project. Go with what works for you. I really look forward to following your restoration!
 

Bob Korves

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#8
Oil Eater? first I have heard of it. I will have to get some and try it out, Thanks. If I find any HLV stuff I will pass it on to you.
I bought some Oil Eater for using in the rehabbing of my 1946-1947 Brown & Sharpe 2L surface grinder. At the suggested concentration, it hardly touched the old grime. At about 8 times the suggested concentration it would start to remove the grime but would also start to soften the old paint, which I was trying to leave in all its funky multi coats and colors glory where possible. So I went back to using parts cleaning solvent, which after soaking for a while would remove most of the grime. I think Oil Eater would likely work better for gunk and grime that is not so old and hardened. It is a water based cleaner.
 

mmcgirr

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#9
At this point, saving the paint is really the least of my concerns, so thanks for the crud removal advice. I will likely pull this sucker down to bare metal because it seems to have been painted over at one point in time by someone who didn't put a lot of care into the matter, and I don't believe there's enough bondo available in the Northeast to cover the dings and what not in the paint job :rolleyes:.

At present, I'm using Zep industrial purple, as well as a variety of other citrus-based, and solvent-based degreasers which are working well. I'll have to look into oil eater as well. I've carb cleaner as well as "old school" solvents - kerosene, diesel, etc. The whole shebang is being thrown at this one (and will be thrown at the Bridgeport as well.)

A brass wire wheel for my battery drill is in my future; manual scrubbing is ........... tedious.

Mike
 

mmcgirr

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#10
It sounds like you have your head around this project pretty well. I will remind you (and myself and others) of some of the important mindsets of this kind of restoration, to my way of thinking:

This is an very early evolutionary version of that series of innovative and top quality machines. Please don't make it into something it is not. Your machine is tangible, soon to be living, history.

It took many decades for this machine to get to where it is today. Taking weeks of letting a part soak to free something up is trivial if the big picture is kept in mind. There are always other details to work on while you wait. In the same spirit of "first cause no harm", there is absolutely no place for banging and forcing things, temper flares, or ever being in a hurry. Bring it back to life gently, caring for each part, bolt, and nut until it is properly correct. The secret is in the details, getting them right, even if not visible in the finished restoration.
I hear you, Bob. I look at it this way: I haven't had a personal lathe / shop for the past 43 years, 4 or 5 more months without one isn't going to kill me.

Think long and hard before making ANY changes or modifications to get it running or to get it done. Then think about it some more...

Think even longer and harder yet about making any changes and modifications to make it more "modern." This is an iconic lathe, built before things like DROs were ever dreamed of. Adding one will not only scar the machine, but will also immediately turn it into a "hot rod" and not a historically accurate restoration. I, for one, think that hot rods are often OK for ordinary Chevys and Fords that were produced in huge quantities, and are not the third HLV off the line. Once you hot rod something, it loses much of its history, and there is no real going back...
I hear you here too. I'm going to start with keeping it as original as possible. However, it's been modified (as far as I can tell), by others before me, and it seems like there are convenient, existing places to put dro scales and so forth (example - the back-side rail the taper attachment usually goes on. I don't have a taper attachment yet, so no harm in using that slot for a scale until I do. Same goes with what looks to be some 1/4-20 holes on the back and right side of the carriage.

My ideas, your project. Go with what works for you. I really look forward to following your restoration!
Thanks for the advice and enthusiasm!

Regards,
Mike
 

Bob Korves

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#11
The fact that it was built in ~1950 further deepens how truly old this machine really is to me -- I was born in 1950!
 

Bob Korves

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#12
I find that I do OK at big projects like this if I just treat it as hundreds of small projects, with my goal being to do the logistics of keeping everything organized so it makes sense to me later -- and so it all gets done. I need to force myself to get started with the most difficult and time consuming portions early on and stick with them so they can be ready when all the easy stuff is done and waiting. Lots of photos, a few drawings of confusing things, and little bags and boxes for keeping things organized and identifiable really help later on after memory has faded some. Written lists are also important to keep track of parts and supplies so they can be on hand when needed. I also find it imperative to understand how everything works and how it works together with the other components. It is really difficult to repair, recondition, or even operate something that I don't know how it works...
 

mmcgirr

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#13
Indeed, that's how I'm going about it. Ziploc baggies for all small parts labeled for pre and post-clean processes. Big snap-loc storage containers for dipping and storage of parts like the apron and so forth.

Lists and lists of things:
dimensions of parts
gear assemblies and gear knowledge
missing or busted parts
parts that I need dimensions for to replicate
tools I need to make

For example:
can someone tell me the "new" dimensions on the 3-jaw chuck dog setscrew non-threaded boss? All the little spindle driving dog setscrews on the chucks, faceplates and so forth have been busted off at some point in time, and shoddy replacements were made, so I have no idea what the actual dimension were or need to be ( diameter, length of non-threaded portion, and OAL of set-screw unit).

In reality, I suppose that it doesn't matter too too much as long as it works properly; but again, I'd like to put it back to as new as possible condition, and if someone has the time and ambition to get some dimensions for me that has the same type of spindle nose / part, that'd be super.

The clutches are interesting mechanisms. Looks like they assembled it in place, as opposed to as a unit, as there are some pinholes for a spanner on the back face (interior of the apron) of the gear for each clutch pack.
 

mmcgirr

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#14
Apron progress:

Bearings in "outer" apron assembly:
(Qty 2 - $21.96 ea @ Amazon - MRC): Torrington MRC 102KSZZ - Long and Cross feed clutch assemblies
(Qty 1 - $39.26 ea @ Amazon - Koyo): Torrington M1281 - closed cup, 90 tooth gear needle roller bearing
(Qty 1 - $5.51 ea @ Amazon - Koyo): Torrington M881 - closed cup, power feed mesh gear needle roller bearing

Bearings on gears:
(Qty 1 - $5.01 ea @ Amazon - Koyo): Torrington BH-68 - cross feed gear bearing

The above is just after a general search, so pricing I'm sure will change with time and hunting (and deals).

Anyway, photos of the above:
MRC 102KSZZ
Apron Bearings - Track Down (5).jpg

M1281
Apron Bearings - Track Down (3).jpg
If this were a better picture, you'd see chooch marks at about the 11 o-clock position from someone thinking it was an oil cup or something at some point in time, instead of a sealed end bearing. This bearing is def. shot. and as a result has lead to some wearing on the 14-tooth gear that is attached to the 90 tooth carriage wheel gear.

M881
Apron Bearings - Track Down (2).jpg

BH68
Apron Bearings - Internal - Track Down (3).jpg

I stripped all the varnish off the front and rear of the apron face, pulled out the entire gearing assembly, checked the current condition of the bearings and gears, disassembled the clutches and interlock plunger assembly, and cleaned the living daylights out of everything. I've still yet to polish the steel to get it prettified.

Reassembled everything for now until I can acquire replacement bearings after cleaning with light coats of 3-n-1 oil just so things stay rust-free and I don't forget where I left off.

As a reminder - varnished up!

Apron - No Handles (1).jpg
Apron Internals (5).jpg

From suck to shiny:
Apron Progress (2).jpg

Cleaned and lubed (for now):

Apron Progress (8).jpg

Apron Progress (10).jpg

There is some wear on the small 14-tooth gear that meshes with the rack that I've lightly touched up / deburred with some fine grit paper and a board. The M1281 and 102KSZZ bearings will need to be replaced. The little M881 and BH68 are seemingly fine though, which is nice.

More to come tomorrow - hopefully the cleaning and reassembly of the clutch actuators. I might possibly get into the back side of the apron as well, but again - cleaning is teeeeeeddddddiiiiioooouuuussss. I may whip up a pseudo parts washer out of found items at some point this week.

Take it easy,
Mike
 

f350ca

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#16
Great project and documentation Mike.
You'll undoubtably enjoy the machine when you get it up and running. I have the younger brother of yours made in 53.
Wonder whats involved with resetting the spindle bearings in the factory? As far as I know mine, serial number 400 was the first that had a user removable spindle.
I used Varsol and a brass brush to remove the crusted lube on mine, lots of it.
The clutches as you've discovered are assembled on the machine and adjusted as required. They operate incredibly smooth and offer a safety device in the fact that they can slip. I found having two separate handles for the longitudinal and cross feed took some getting used to, I'd reach for the wrong one to disengage the movement. With the clutch mechanism you can hold the hand wheel and the clutch will slip avoiding a crash.
I need to make a new pin for my 3 jaw so I'll get you the dimensions. They don't appear to be hardened, probably to act as a shear pin in a crash. I don't expect my dog drive plate has been used much, so should be measurable.
The pinion that engages the rack was damaged on mine, a broken tooth, expect the carriage was bumped with a forklift or something while it spent decades in a warehouse before I got it. I made a new one, machined the old one away then heat shrunk and pinned its replacement on. If yours is worn it may result in a cyclic motion when driving the carriage that might affect the finish when turning. It won't be a true rolling action between the teeth.
I'd intended to add a DRO to mine but after using it found the dials to be so accurate it wasn't necessary. May still do it at some point but its not a priority for now.
Keep up the excellent work and please keep posting.

Greg
 

mmcgirr

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#17
Some more news: started working on the internal apron assembly and jotting down notes of bearings and making sure things are proper.

However,
1) The clutch caged thrust bearings are a pain in the tuckus
2) One of the clutch handle springs is wonked, so I'll have to remake / replace that.
3) The interlock lever pin is busted, so I'll have to remake the pin.

Anyway, bearings:
(Qty 1: $5.01 ea @ Amazon - Koyo): Torrington B-88 (Power feed gear cluster seat bearing)
(Qty 2: $10.84 ea @ Amazon - Koyo GB-108?): Torrington B-108 (Long. and Cross clutch gear seat bearings)
(Qty 1: $7.12 ea @ Amazon - Koyo): Torrington B-128 (Carriage gear seat bearing)

In retrospect, and since everything is apart, I really need to take proper ID, OD and depth measurements, as opposed to just locating the proper Torrington part number and hoping that the Koyo (or whoever) equivalents will work. I imagine they will, but I can't definitively say that.

Anywho, some more bearing pictures:
Caged clutch thrust bearings
(these little dudes are causing me no end of grief, mostly because the cages are shot, and don't hold the balls properly. Anyone know how to specify a cage? I imagine it's by # of balls and diameter of balls and OD of cage, but...)
Clutch Caged Bearings (2).jpg
Clutch Caged Bearings (1).jpg
Clutch Caged Bearings (3).jpg

Inner Apron Bearing pictures:

Power Feed shaft bearing:
Apron - Internal Bearings (5).jpg
Apron - Internal Bearings (7).jpg

Clutch shaft inner bearing:
Apron - Internal Bearings (8).jpg
Apron - Internal Bearings (13).jpg

Carriage gear inner bearing:
Apron - Internal Bearings (14).jpg
Apron - Internal Bearings (13).jpg

Of course, all these photos are rotated because I didn't hold my phone properly, and there's no rotation feature in this forum software - sorry about that, I'll try to be more diligent in the future.

I'm going to polish everything this evening, and I'll do another round of photos after that again - except it won't be assembled for the remake of the broken / mashed up pieces I have to take care of first.

Question: what lubrication should I be using within the apron, and how much (ounces, pint, etc.) should I use? I see in the later HLV-H manuals that I should be using ATF up to the sight glass, but I have neither a sight glass, nor drain plug and all that jazz, so I'm rather mystified - any help on that front?

Regards,
Mike
 
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JPH

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#18
Nice photos. I know someone who is working on serial number HVL 106. I'll try to find where you are posting because what you are doing is very interesting.
 

mmcgirr

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#19
I'm still going to post here, I've just been incredibly swamped at work, so I've not had any time to work on the lathe of late. It regretfully hasn't progressed past where I last posted, with one exception ... I removed the outer gear box to begin that tear down and examination. But that's as far as it's gotten. Have to acquire / make some pin spanners when I have some free time so I can properly remove the collars that hold the gears.

Additionally, I'm still trying to research how / if I should remove the spindle to change the belt out, and what exactly that means for an early model HLV (e.g. bearings replacement and so forth). I may just end up going with a segmented belt for the pulley->spindle pulley length. Honestly not sure yet.

Regards,
Mike
 

Bob Korves

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#20
I have been sourcing most of my bearings, as well as o-rings and seals, from Motion Industries, they have branches all over and will transfer out of stock items from another location to one near you without charge, usually only takes overnight in my experience. Helpful staff, very good prices, high quality stuff, and easy to deal with as well.
 

Silverbullet

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#21
That model is sought after , the qcgb isn't on the others from what I've seen. The toolroom model usually commands bigger prices. I'd like to pickup one of there turret LATHES with the cross slide , and an extra tailstock. Your lathe should turnout to be super accurate , the Hardinage lathe is top shelf in my opinion, there's a very very old one for sale in New York with a wooden table top with the motor belts and clutch system open with very little protection .
Keep up the good work it's looking great , you will be happy with it . Good luck really nice machines , I'm so envious , but I'm happy with the machines I own.
 

mmcgirr

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#22
JPH I hope you don't mind that I bring our PM conversation into my HLV thread, but I figure more eyes the better (also for some future person looking for information).

That said:
"
Thanks for the reply.

I am helping the owner of serial number HLV 106 reassemble his spindle/head. He had taken it apart until he could not remove the left bearing. By left I mean farther away from the chuck, farther away from the tail stock.

On a quick look, it seems to me that the head casting is in two parts, and the left bearing was installed before the two halves were joined (some how) and mated with the way. Some old pictures on the internet seem to lead me to think this. The owner of 106 does not, yet, want to split the head.

He had it apart for sometime. While he was mulling over what to do, he went on to another project. I came along and offered to reassemble the machine and then to do a careful analysis of what is causing the rings on a face cut.

He is almost done with his other project and we will be getting back to the HLV 106.

I suggested to the owner of 106 that we ought to take pictures and make measurements of each part as we reassemble the spindle.

Please keep in touch, especially if you decide to post elsewhere, let me know where you are going.
JPH
"
 

mmcgirr

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#24
Here's a really quick (and crappy too!) annotated thing that summarizes the separation of concerns on the lathe:

QCGB-ANNOTATED.png

The handwheel (and 5C collet tightener) all come off the left side of the QCGB (quick change gearbox). The QCGB comes off the left side after a bunch of fiddling as mentioned previously.

Headstock-Rear-Annotated.png

As usual, any questions you might have that I can answer reasonably, I'll do my best.

Mike
 
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mmcgirr

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#25
That model is sought after , the qcgb isn't on the others from what I've seen. The toolroom model usually commands bigger prices. I'd like to pickup one of there turret LATHES with the cross slide , and an extra tailstock. Your lathe should turnout to be super accurate , the Hardinage lathe is top shelf in my opinion, there's a very very old one for sale in New York with a wooden table top with the motor belts and clutch system open with very little protection .
Keep up the good work it's looking great , you will be happy with it . Good luck really nice machines , I'm so envious , but I'm happy with the machines I own.
That lathe you describe sounds like an early Cataract, but I'm no Hardinge historian. Something like this?

Cataract.jpg

Mike
 

JPH

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#26
Thanks, Mike.

I'll get pictures of 106 and post so you can see what it might look like when you take your spindle out.

Sorry, it will take a while. As I said else where to co1859, the owner of 106 into another project which I think he will finish soon and clear some room so that more pictures of the head from the inside can be taken and posted. The spindle is completely removed at this time.

Your posting about 134 etc requiring return to factory, that is 100 to 133 does not have to be returned, gives hope to 106 that the there is a way to remove the last bearing.


co1859: I don't know how Mike moved our conversation to this thread,
but if similar consolidating trick can be made to our PM it would be appreciated.
 

JPH

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#27
Mike, thanks for your explanation, and the pictures of the head of 102, front and back.

106 has the spindle completely removed from the head. The right bearing, just one, is out of the machine as well.

The access panel in the back is removed, so there are three ways to look at the inside of the head. In your annotated picture of the head, the front view, you have marked a heavy vertical red line. When we looked into the head, we can see a ball bearing about co-planer to your red line and perpendicular to the axis of the spindle. The bearing is held into a pocket with a C clip retainer with two small holes at the ends. The C looks like an internal type. It looks like the bearing is in the left half of the head.

By the way, Bob says that there is a screwed on ring that has to be turned off before the spindle comes off.

I just exchanged text with Bob and will look at the head carefully at 5:30 pm today.

In summary:

1. I think the head casting is in two vertical parts mating at about where you have the red line. That will be confirmed this afternoon.

2. I saw one ball bearing on the right side of the spindle. I will confirm if there were two. (I was not there in real-time when it was disassembled.)

3. I read that HLVs were stamped with matching sn in three places. That's low priority right now, but I'll keep my eyes open.

Jung
 

JPH

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#29
It turns out that the removal of the left bearing is quite easy. There are two screws holding the head casting to the way. So, after the spindle has been removed, releasing the two screws at the bottom of the head casting allows it to be slid to the right.

The left bearing is accessible. The left bearing is in a pocket in the head casting, and a flat ring screwed to the head casting holds the bearing in the pocket.

Details of what it was like with pictures will be posted on the HLV serial number 106 thread.
 

JPH

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#30
Mike,

We were able to remove the left spindle bearing on the HLV sn 106. Pictures have been posted at
the tread:

Hardinge HLV Serial Number 106 ( ca 1950 ) Restoration
 
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