[4]

Hardinge Tl Autofeed Not Engaging In Headstock

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

W6PUG

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2012
Messages
80
Likes
21
#1
I had started this in another thread that had originally addressed gearing on feed, and it was long so I am starting a new thread to address the titled subject.
Bottom line: during transit from CA to WA, something moved, loosened/fell out inside headstock and autofeed shaft will not commence turning (when actuator is engaged) so I can engage half nut to start autofeeding the cross slide. Everything works fine when operating by hand but of course the surface is nowhere nearly as nice as autofeed allows. So, something inside headstock is hinky. I have the Hardinge brochure that shows all of the lever and knob functions, and another one that tells how to thread using Hardinge, but there are no drawings available for how the TL (circa 1940's) works inside the headstock. If anyone has experience, has a TL, or has any idea what goes on inside I would be grateful. I did take the back cover off, but I do not see any clues. I do have a borescope that I am going to feed into the headstock and ask someone to slowly turn the shaft so I can try to see who does what to whom .... so ... I also promised to get some photos of the lathe and headstock, and will try to do so this weekend (Sat is wife's bday so I guess I had better not spend it in the shop!) ....
Thanks for considering and any advice you might conjur up .... I just need a place to start looking.
Thanks again - doug
 

W6PUG

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2012
Messages
80
Likes
21
#2
OK, I am getting my butt kicked ... problem I had above was due to the sleeve where a collet closer would go, so we figured that out after about an hour, but I think I am seeing a secondary problem that could be serious ... remember this is on a TL which I think is almost same as T-10 ... but I have it down to something in the feed engagement lever clutch is goofy .... it will not engage and feed. Feed screw is doing ok .... it was partially engaging but has gotten worse and will not engage. I looked at removing the engage lever with the 3 bolts because there is a clutch under it but I could not get the large handwheel for the manual feed off .... rolled the dial around until I saw what I think is a hex allen that fixes the wheel to the shaft, but went through 50 allens trying to find the right one and no luck, so if I cannot get that wheel off, there is no way I can get enough clearance to get the feed engagement lever back to inspect the spring clutch thing (not sure what you call it) .... Is the next logical step to completely remove the apron and cross feed? I love this old girl but she is making me nuts and I could use some help.
Thanks guys ... I know somebody has done this ... think I am just getting frustrated enough with it that I am missing something that is probably obvious to a real machinist. Appreciate any help you guys can render. If I don't get a handle on this soon I may have to look at other options just to keep my sanity (what little is left of it :eek:) Thanks for "listening"/reading. doug
 

Silverbullet

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
3,350
Likes
1,613
#3
Try using a torx bit sometimes the work where the hex Allen won't. I've used them on all kinds of equipment over the years. Small engines use lots of different bolts and screws. Not sure but try it may be just enough.
 

W6PUG

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2012
Messages
80
Likes
21
#4
I will give it a shot - I had not thought of that and I do have a set of them THANKS! Will let you know what I find out ....
 

W6PUG

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2012
Messages
80
Likes
21
#5
I tried it and no joy .... was hoping that was the case or a roll pin or something, but not a roll pin because no place to drive it out ... so still trying to figure that one out ... but thanks for the suggestion ... as T Edison once said, it takes a thousand failures to create the one success (paraphrased). Appreciate you looking at this ... somehow this actually wound up in two threads. but so far outcome is the same. Take care .... ddj
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top