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hello and looking for help to ID an old metal lathe I'm looking at buying.

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wastric

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Hi, newbie here and new to machining but have always wanted to learn about it. I plan on making it my hobby as I approach retirement. I want to find equipment I can do fun projects on and possibly restore them in thew process.
A old lathe came up on Craigslist here in my area. The owner doesn't know much about it, who made it or when. I took the photos from his ad and am posting them here in the hopes someone know more about it. He states in has a 12" swing and the bed over all is about 30" so that would leave about 24" between centers as this lathe tailstock is fairly narrow. He thinks is at least pre-war and possibly turn of the century and from the photos I would not be shocked if it is. Here is the listing text:
"Offered for sale is a metal turning lathe and a good deal of associated tooling. This is a very unique lathe, it has a quick change gearbox for cutting threads which is located on the rail stock end. The carriage long feed pinon gear is missing a tooth and the half-nut handle is bent. Other than that the lathe appears to be in good condition and cuts metal nicely. Asking $875 obo. "

Any help would be great because he lives over an hour away so I would like to know as much as possible before I travel out to the country to see it.
Thanks .00e0e_8mOL7haQgM1_1200x900.jpg00L0L_aF4mXJFJATa_1200x900.jpg00m0m_gHzZ9i22y7w_1200x900.jpg00q0q_dKOIaSifR74_1200x900.jpg01616_ep6OMh4FcF7_1200x900.jpg
 

Superburban

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I see a bunch of unique features. I tool my shot a Google, but no luck. Hope someone can come up with something. Looking forward to see more pics.
 

silence dogood

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It looks like a Barnes lathe. Does it have two lead screws, one on top of the other and turn opposite directions? Chances are it is, although some only had one lead screw. My father in law had one( the family still got it). Interesting machine. If you do get, I'd like to see pictures of the quick change with cover off.
 

wastric

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I only know whats in the description and photos from the ad. I plan on asking him more questions once I have more info. Any idea how old Barnes lathes are? Any manuals or other info?
 

markba633csi

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Fairly prehistoric but might be a fun project- notice it does not have a rotating compound so a limitation there. And the 3-jaw looks odd. Some good accessories though
mark
 

wastric

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Since you gave me the Barnes clue,I have been comparing images of every model of Barnes I can find and I agree that it is almost certainly a Barnes. It is not any of the ones I have found photos of though. The 4.5 , 5, 5.5, 6 and 13 headstock casting fits over the ways outer edge but this one clearly shows the headstock casting resting on top of the ways with the edge of the ways showing below it. It also has a powered shaft running along the back of the ways that looks like it is the power to the right hand mounted quick change gearbox.I have not found any mention of a Barnes with such a feature. I guess its possible that its a post 1920 single lead screw type. It also could be something they built during the war for war production needs even though by then they had apparently gotten almost completely out of the lathe business in favor of multi process machines used in the automotive assembly line type use. It does have a 3 speed flatbelt main drive pully which fell out of favor during the depression with most manufacturers. At least its not one of the models with the large fragile 104 tooth gear hanging out the front left side like most of the Barnes do.
I am starting to think that unless hes willing to take alot less for it, its a bit too old and obscure to be much more than a fun restoration project.
 

Superburban

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I think the quick change gear box (QCGB) was added on later in life. Shop made? I think it is a good chance. Look at the pics on lathes.com, and they generally have markings engraved. That QCGB, has all the letters stamped.

Price? It does have a fair amount of accessories, But I still think it is on the high side. Especially as was pointed out, there is not compound. I think that limits what you can do a lot. Also no center hole through the spindle, another feature I use a lot. So for a working lathe, The limitations would about kill the deal for me, then the price, and the drive, would do it in.

If you do decide to pass, see if you can get some more pics from the seller. I would love to see pics from the ends, to see how the QCGB works.

Would be a great piece for a museum.
 

silence dogood

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The Barnes lathe that is in the family use to have a stand with a treadle. It was converted to run on an electric motor. The quick change in the picture appears to be a mod. The upper lead screw these things are hard to see. My father-in law used the family one until he got his Shelton. One brother-in-law used it until he was able to buy a Southbend when they were still being made here in the USA. Now a second brother-in-law plans to use it as a second lathe for his gun smithing. Personally, I'd take the hour drive and take a look at it and see if he is willing part with it at a lower price. It would make a good first lathe. This is my opinion.
 

Nogoingback

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When the seller says it a "very unique" lathe, what they mean is that it's very old. It's a cool old machine, but is it
the sort of thing what you really want, or need? Apart from being cheap it has nothing to recommend it compared
with a newer machine unless antique lathes are your thing. If this is simply the first machine you've looked at, I would
suggest taking the time to educate yourself a bit more before pulling the trigger. There are a bunch of threads here on
the forum on the subject of buying a first lathe which would be a good place to start. And don't hesitate to ask more
questions.
 
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