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Help Identifying a Few Tools Would be Greatly Appreciated

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JoshS

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#1
As I was going through some old tools I came across a few I had never seen before. The first photo shows what looks like an old brass manual boring tool. It was stored in the bag in photo with the bits. I messed around with it and couldn't figure out how it was used. Hoping somebody has seen it before and could fill me in. Photos 2&3 show what I though was an inside micrometer but it has no markings on it for measurement. Fully closed it is about 1 1/2" and open it is around 2 1/4". With the ends I was thinking maybe some kind of adjustable standard for micrometers. Photos 4&5 are what I initially thought were trammel points but I have never seen any with set screws. Photos 6&7 I have no clue. Any knowledge passed down would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Josh
 

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pdentrem

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#2
The two long items look like they are for vernier caliper to a measure hole center to center.
 

JoshS

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#3
Thanks pdentrem. I think you are right. I believe they are center line attachments. Much appreciated. Sometimes it just takes another set of eyes. I should have known that.
 

FOMOGO

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#4
The last two items are meant to go in T-slots on a mill or shaper table. Perhaps to hold something cylindrical, but the real use probably went to the grave with the man who made them. Mike
 

JoshS

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#5
Thanks Mike. I do have an old rotary table. Might have been used on that for something.
 

Cadillac

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#6
First item looks like a drill for wood. Does the cone piece move? it’s maybe a depth control or to keep center on hole while bit spins. 2nd thingy idk. 3rd caliper arm extensions. 4th are for a bench center rig or like. You put a rod on them and measure. The bottom is keyed to run the t slot for alignment. You can use for balancing too.
 

JoshS

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#7
Thanks Cadillac. The cone piece does spin freely and the is attached to a nut that adjusts height on thread. Top nut looks like it holds first nut in position. I figured it was for wood but just doesn't make sense how it would drill unless you are supposed to adjust depth constantly. Thanks for your input.
 

cathead

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#8
It looks like 77 and 82 are mountable tiny vee blocks. Also, 71 and 73 are called trammel points.
 

ThinWoodsman

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#9
The last two items are meant to go in T-slots on a mill or shaper table. Perhaps to hold something cylindrical, but the real use probably went to the grave with the man who made them. Mike
Yeah, they look like fixtures for holding round stock to a table, perhaps for a repeat job. A clamp goes on top of the workpiece, and these keep it off the table. Kinda neat, I might make a couple just to play with 'em.
 

JimDawson

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#10
The first picture reminds me of a steam valve reseater. But not quite the same.

1543965664523.png
 

eugene13

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#11
An ancient steam valve re-seater, the parts on the wire are for cutting the seat.
 

JoshS

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#12
Thank you Jim and Eugene. I would have never guessed but it does look very similar to that photo. The bits are marked 4, 6, 8, and 11. I would have thought wood working but that is why I come to this forum. Good to learn from those with knowledge.
 

682bear

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#13
I would guess #2 and #3 is an internal micrometer of sorts... you fit it to an inside dimension, then measure it with regular mics... similar to a snap guage.

-Bear
 

JoshS

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#14
Thanks Bear. My initial thoughts as well.
 
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