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Help with Identification of electric motor

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Mandmj

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#1
Hello, I need some help w/ ID of a motor. I actually have 2 of these units (they were my late father's). One has a 90 degree reduction gearbox I believe, and is wired to a controller box w/ a potentiometer for speed control. I'm in the process of hunting for a lathe, and the only thought I have is could one of these be used to make a lathe variable speed, but any and all info would be a big help.

Thank you.
 

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benmychree

John York
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#2
Yes, that is a shunt wound DC motor, and it should be able to achieve variable speed with the proper controls; bear in mind that the lower speeds may not be able to be used for sustained periods due to heating issues since when running slow, the internal fan in the motor will not bring full cooling to the motor's internal parts.
 

RJSakowski

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#3

Mandmj

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#4
Great, thanks.
Would it be adequate/powerful enough for a home lathe in the 10-12" swing range?
thanks again!
 

benmychree

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#5
There is a big difference between a universal motor (such as a router motor or vacuum cleaner motor) and a shunt wound DC motor, they don't run on AC.
 

markba633csi

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#6
3/4 hp would be OK for a 10" lathe
Mark
 

Mandmj

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#7
Thanks for all the quick information.
 
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