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Help with removing Bearings, 6" Rockwell Belt Sander

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Has anyone removed/replaced the bearings in the upper roller/drum?
There are 2 lock nuts on both ends and a notched not looks like a pre-load bearing adjustment nut.
All removed, but the shaft is rock solid.
Which way to press out?
Thank you! IMG_1061[1].JPG
 

Comments

#2
It looks like the shaft need to be pushed ''down'' through the bearing in the picture orientation, then the bearing gets pressed ''up'' to remove
 
#3
Factory bearings can sometimes be glued in place, manufactures use loctite when installing bearings and can be a pain to remove, try little heat on the old bearing if there is no plastic parts to melt
 
#4
Like Jim said you’d hold the casting and press the shaft down. Orientated just like picture. Then you’d flip casting and press bearing out.
To install press bearing closest to drum in housing first. Then press drum shaft through that bearing. Then press other bearing.
If there is a spacer between bearings most likely theirs no preload just tight. If no spacer then your gonna be dealing with preloading the bearing. Which I would think theirs a spacer?? Good luck
 
#5
Vintage machinery site has a good write up on what you're doing.they have several precautions on how not to press on certain parts.
 
#6
Got it done.
Found what not to do.
The drums were really stuck to the shaft.
There is a stop on one end, so the bearings had a definite press on/off procedure.
The bearings are shielded 6202Z ND.
Do you think they are the originals?
 

Attachments

#7
doesn't much matter if they are orig or not. If they don't feel or sound good replace them
 
#8
If you have a lathe I would chuck one end and center the other end and use some 400 grit emery cloth and polish off the rust. be careful not to change the diameter of the bearing journal. Then I would call a local bearing house and order some new shielded bearings. A good brand like NSK or SKF and not some Ebay bargain made in China. Be careful when you install the bearings. Use a leaded cold roll punch and not a pin punch. If I was doing it I would heat the bearings and expand the inner race so it would drop on. :) Rich
 
#9
If you are going to heat the bearings, which is a good way to get them on without any impact, make sure they have steel cages and shields. I took a set out of the oven only to find what ever plastic was used in the cages had softened. Sometimes the lessons learned are expensive LOL
 
#10
I purchased good shielded bearings from McMaster.
It went together no sweat.
This belt sander sure is a handy addition to my shop. I use it all the time.
Thanks for the advice. IMG_1094[1].JPG
 
#11
Nice job. I use mine all the time. Great way for fast stock removal and quick radius’s. A nice little project would be to make a adjustable angle plate for the t slot so your perpendicular to belt face. :encourage:
 
#12
Glad it worked out for you. When I got my wide belt machine I did not realize how much I would use it. Mines torn down a bit right now for some clean up, fresh paint and Ive got bearings coming for the motor and roller. I got it used and it now needs the repairs.
 
#13
So nice to get the tools squared away. I picked up an old Craftsman 6 in. belt/9 in. disc for $150 recently. The miter guide from a Craftsman band saw fits perfectly. Nice square parts without side milling. I use the disc more than the belt, wish I had a dedicated table for each.
 
#14
Nice job. I use mine all the time. Great way for fast stock removal and quick radius’s. A nice little project would be to make a adjustable angle plate for the t slot so your perpendicular to belt face. :encourage:
True, I find myself drawing 90 and 45 degree lines with a Sharpie as a guide. I am making a welding table right now, this sander is great for beveling and de-burring on each end of many pieces.
Considering
 
#15
Very nice sander!
"they don't make s'm like they used to"...... Old but true saying......
Yeah I remember when I did mine, I was missing the spanner nut and they wanted like $100.00 on "E Replacement"
Ended up making one.
I remember they caution you when pressing that at because money a do it yourself or has broken that casting mine basically fell right apart because it was rigged the spanner nut was missing and they had tapped it for set screws to retain the bearing I mean it worked fortunately for me it just fell apart

Sent from my MotoG3 using Tapatalk
 
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