[4]

Help

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#1
I don't usually ask for prayers, but I have been pretty sick on and off the past month.
Drinking bowel prep. now preparing for a colonoscopy In late AM tomorrow.
Very bloated and nauseous trying to drink this crap, and having a hard time.
Supposed to drink 8 oz every 15 minuets, but have had to skip a few.
Need to get this stuff down so it can do it's work. So far, 3 hours later, nothing happening.
Thank You,
Tony
 

Ray C

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Likes
1,410
#2
Yeah, that stuff is pretty awful but, it will kick-in soon enough...

Good luck and I hope you get a favorable diagnosis...
 

rdfoster

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2012
Messages
72
Likes
4
#3
Go-Lightly is a misnomer. I've had several. The first one without any kind of sedative. Now except for the prep which you are doing now it's a piece of cake.

Hope you get good news.

Bob
 

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#4
Thanks guys, It kicked in right after I sent this.
Still about 1/2 the bottle to drink yet.
It don't really taste that nasty, it's just this bloating that is getting me.
Thats the thing I have been having, is the stomach pains, seems OK for a few days, but if I eat or maybe eat too much at this point, then is when I have problems.
Just want to start feeling good again.
 

Tony Wells

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
7,053
Likes
8,124
#5
Had a couple of those myself. You ought to read this, it will lighten up the subject:

OK. You turned 50. You know you're supposed to get a colonoscopy. But you haven't. Here are your reasons:
1. You've been busy.
2. You don't have a history of cancer in your family.
3. You haven't noticed any problems.
4. You don't want a doctor to stick a tube 17,000 feet up your butt.
Let's examine these reasons one at a time. No, wait, let's not. Because you and I both know that the only real reason is No. 4. This is natural. The idea of having another human, even a medical human, becoming deeply involved in what is technically known as your ''behindular zone'' gives you the creeping willies.
I know this because I am like you, except worse. I yield to nobody in the field of being a pathetic weenie medical coward. I become faint and nauseous during even very minor medical procedures, such as making an appointment by phone. It's much worse when I come into physical contact with the medical profession. More than one doctor's office has a dent in the floor caused by my forehead striking it seconds after I got a shot.
In 1997, when I turned 50, everybody told me I should get a colonoscopy. I agreed that I definitely should, but not right away. By following this policy, I reached age 55 without having had a colonoscopy. Then I did something so pathetic and embarrassing that I am frankly ashamed to tell you about it.
What happened was, a giant 40-foot replica of a human colon came to Miami Beach. Really. It's an educational exhibit called the Colossal Colon, and it was on a nationwide tour to promote awareness of colo-rectal cancer. The idea is, you crawl through the Colossal Colon, and you encounter various educational items in there, such as polyps, cancer and hemorrhoids the size of regulation volleyballs, and you go, ''Whoa, I better find out if I contain any of these things,'' and you get a colonoscopy.
If you are as a professional humor writer, and there is a giant colon within a 200-mile radius, you are legally obligated to go see it. So I went to Miami Beach and crawled through the Colossal Colon. I wrote a column about it, making tasteless colon jokes. But I also urged everyone to get a colonoscopy. I even, when I emerged from the Colossal Colon, signed a pledge stating that I would get one.
But I didn't get one. I was a fraud, a hypocrite, a liar. I was practically a member of Congress.
Five more years passed. I turned 60, and I still hadn't gotten a colonoscopy. Then, a couple of weeks ago, I got an e-mail from my brother Sam, who is 10 years younger than I am, but more mature. The email was addressed to me and my middle brother, Phil. It said:
``Dear Brothers,
``I went in for a routine colonoscopy and got the dreaded diagnosis: cancer. We're told it's early and that there is a good prognosis that they can get it all out, so, fingers crossed, knock on wood, and all that. And of course they told me to tell my siblings to get screened. I imagine you both have.''
Um. Well.
First I called Sam. He was hopeful, but scared. We talked for a while, and when we hung up, I called my friend Andy Sable, a gastroenterologist, to make an appointment for a colonoscopy. A few days later, in his office, Andy showed me a color diagram of the colon, a lengthy organ that appears to go all over the place, at one point passing briefly through Minneapolis. Then Andy explained the colonoscopy procedure to me in a thorough, reassuring and patient manner. I nodded thoughtfully, but I didn't really hear anything he said, because my brain was shrieking, quote, ``HE'S GOING TO STICK A TUBE 17,000 FEET UP YOUR BUTT!''



I left Andy's office with some written instructions, and a prescription for a product called ''MoviPrep,'' which comes in a box large enough to hold a microwave oven. I will discuss MoviPrep in detail later; for now suffice it to say that we must never allow it to fall into the hands of America's enemies.
I spent the next several days productively sitting around being nervous. Then, on the day before my colonoscopy, I began my preparation. In accordance with my instructions, I didn't eat any solid food that day; all I had was chicken broth, which is basically water, only with less flavor. Then, in the evening, I took the MoviPrep. You mix two packets of powder together in a one-liter plastic jug, then you fill it with lukewarm water. (For those unfamiliar with the metric system, a liter is about 32 gallons.) Then you have to drink the whole jug. This takes about an hour, because MoviPrep tastes -- and here I am being kind -- like a mixture of goat spit and urinal cleanser, with just a hint of lemon.
The instructions for MoviPrep, clearly written by somebody with a great sense of humor, state that after you drink it, ''a loose watery bowel movement may result.'' This is kind of like saying that after you jump off your roof, you may experience contact with the ground.
MoviPrep is a nuclear laxative. I don't want to be too graphic, here, but: Have you ever seen a space shuttle launch? This is pretty much the MoviPrep experience, with you as the shuttle. There are times when you wish the commode had a seat belt. You spend several hours pretty much confined to the bathroom, spurting violently. You eliminate everything. And then, when you figure you must be totally empty, you have to drink another liter of MoviPrep, at which point, as far as I can tell, your bowels travel into the future and start eliminating food that you have not even eaten yet.
After an action-packed evening, I finally got to sleep. The next morning my wife drove me to the clinic. I was very nervous. Not only was I worried about the procedure, but I had been experiencing occasional return bouts of MoviPrep spurtage. I was thinking, ''What if I spurt on Andy?'' How do you apologize to a friend for something like that? Flowers would not be enough.
At the clinic I had to sign many forms acknowledging that I understood and totally agreed with whatever the hell the forms said. Then they led me to a room full of other colonoscopy people, where I went inside a little curtained space and took off my clothes and put on one of those hospital garments designed by sadist perverts, the kind that, when you put it on, makes you feel even more naked than when you are actually naked.
Then a nurse named Eddie put a little needle in a vein in my left hand. Ordinarily I would have fainted, but Eddie was very good, and I was already lying down. Eddie also told me that some people put vodka in their MoviPrep. At first I was ticked off that I hadn't thought of this, but then I pondered what would happen if you got yourself too tipsy to make it to the bathroom, so you were staggering around in full Fire Hose Mode. You would have no choice but to burn your house.
When everything was ready, Eddie wheeled me into the procedure room, where Andy was waiting with a nurse and an anesthesiologist. I did not see the 17,000-foot tube, but I knew Andy had it hidden around there somewhere. I was seriously nervous at this point. Andy had me roll over on my left side, and the anesthesiologist began hooking something up to the needle in my hand. There was music playing in the room, and I realized that the song was Dancing Queen by Abba. I remarked to Andy that, of all the songs that could be playing during this particular procedure, Dancing Queen has to be the least appropriate

''You want me to turn it up?'' said Andy, from somewhere behind me.
''Ha ha,'' I said.
And then it was time, the moment I had been dreading for more than a decade. If you are squeamish, prepare yourself, because I am going to tell you, in explicit detail, exactly what it was like.
I have no idea. Really. I slept through it. One moment, Abba was shrieking ``Dancing Queen! Feel the beat from the tambourine . . .''
. . . and the next moment, I was back in the other room, waking up in a very mellow mood. Andy was looking down at me and asking me how I felt. I felt excellent. I felt even more excellent when Andy told me that it was all over, and that my colon had passed with flying colors. I have never been prouder of an internal organ.
But my point is this: In addition to being a pathetic medical weenie, I was a complete moron. For more than a decade I avoided getting a procedure that was, essentially, nothing. There was no pain and, except for the MoviPrep, no discomfort. I was risking my life for nothing.
If my brother Sam had been as stupid as I was -- if, when he turned 50, he had ignored all the medical advice and avoided getting screened -- he still would have had cancer. He just wouldn't have known. And by the time he did know -- by the time he felt symptoms -- his situation would have been much, much more serious. But because he was a grown-up, the doctors caught the cancer early, and they operated and took it out. Sam is now recovering and eating what he describes as ''really, really boring food.'' His prognosis is good, and everybody is optimistic, fingers crossed, knock on wood, and all that.
Which brings us to you, Mr. or Mrs. or Miss or Ms. Over-50-And-Hasn't-Had-a-Colonoscopy. Here's the deal: You either have colo-rectal cancer, or you don't. If you do, a colonoscopy will enable doctors to find it and do something about it. And if you don't have cancer, believe me, it's very reassuring to know you don't. There is no sane reason for you not to have it done.
I am so eager for you to do this that I am going to induce you with an Exclusive Limited Time Offer. If you, after reading this, get a colonoscopy, let me know by sending a self-addressed stamped envelope to Dave Barry Colonoscopy Inducement, The Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, FL 33132. I will send you back a certificate, signed by me and suitable for framing if you don't mind framing a cheesy certificate, stating that you are a grown-up who got a colonoscopy. Accompanying this certificate will be a square of limited-edition custom-printed toilet paper with an image of Miss Paris Hilton on it. You may frame this also, or use it in whatever other way you deem fit.
But even if you don't want this inducement, please get a colonoscopy. If I can do it, you can do it. Don't put it off. Just do it.
Be sure to stress that you want the non-Abba version.


 

Bill C.

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 11, 2013
Messages
1,390
Likes
154
#6
I don't usually ask for prayers, but I have been pretty sick on and off the past month.
Drinking bowel prep. now preparing for a colonoscopy In late AM tomorrow.
Very bloated and nauseous trying to drink this crap, and having a hard time.
Supposed to drink 8 oz every 15 minuets, but have had to skip a few.
Need to get this stuff down so it can do it's work. So far, 3 hours later, nothing happening.
Thank You,
Tony
I had the test. My prep wasn't that bad, I was already in the hospital after lossing a lot of weight for no reason. There must several different preps. They discovered I have one of the blood csncers. I knew someone who also hated the 48 hour prep.
 

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#7
Thanks
Yeah, I've put mine off too, I am 57.
I'm getting it done tomorrow,
Hope to god it's not cancer, Guess I'll find out.

- - - Updated - - -

This stuff is 4 liters.
 

8ntsane

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
1,117
Likes
16
#8
Tony
Hope all goes well tomorrow
 

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#10
They found a Lesion, and need to wait for the biopsy.
I don’t know, the doctor didn’t seem real concerned, but then again, maybe he didn’t want to worry me just yet.
I don't know.
 

righto88

Active User
Registered
Joined
Jun 24, 2012
Messages
173
Likes
2
#11
I hope all goes well for you and you have good news.
 

Tony Wells

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
7,053
Likes
8,124
#12
A lesion in and of itself is not a life threatening problem. It can have many causes. I imagine the Dr. would have given you some indication. Mine always do, based on their prior experience. Not always right, but generally they are.

Let's all hope for the best possible result for you!
 

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#13
I hope all goes well for you and you have good news.
A lesion in and of itself is not a life threatening problem. It can have many causes. I imagine the Dr. would have given you some indication. Mine always do, based on their prior experience. Not always right, but generally they are.

Let's all hope for the best possible result for you!
Thanks Guys, I will try to stay positive.
 
D

Deleted member 17524

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#14
I had my first one at 52. I have one every 2 years now. So far I have been lucky. Good luck.

"Billy G"
 

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#15
Thanks Bill, Just have to wait for the results. My stomach has been bothering me a while too, they need to find out what is causing it.
He said He didn't know if the lesion was causing it or not.
 

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#16
Tony, I hope This is not a bad question, but did you brother make it?
Mine was cancer, but he said he got it all out.
I am taking Chemo as a precaution though.
4 more treatments to go, every other week.
Day 1 beats the crap out of me.
Also had to get an Ileostomy, But they are optimistic that it can be reversed.
It was a tough battle for a while, but I am doing pretty good now.
 

Stephen Hopkins

Swarf
Registered
Joined
Mar 6, 2014
Messages
11
Likes
4
#17
Congrats on getting the test! I discovered I had rectal cancer when I could no longer pass anything. On the up side, the removal of everything from my descending colon to daylight cured my lactose intolerance, was the ultimate cure for hemorrhoids, reduced my paper work, and endowed me with the ability to embroider the snow in TWO colors if I pinch the tail of the bag like a cake decorator. Surviving and joking about it for 12 years at age 67. BTW: I got to the point where I could "shot-gun" a pint of barium in a matter of seconds. I use the empty "Golytely" jugs for carrying water for my hopper cooled engines at shows.
 

Tony Wells

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
7,053
Likes
8,124
#18
mrbreeze, (Tony), I'm glad to hear that your procedure enabled a treatment to begin, and hopefully will put this problem behind you. I am guessing that when you read my post you thought I may have written it. As much as I'd like to claim it, I did not. A comedian named Dave Barry did, and it was his brother who was diagnosed with cancer. I do have a brother, not yet 50, but I am already working on him about it so he doesn't put it off. I'm due for another test within the next year, and hopefully will be a non-event yet again.

Tony
 

george wilson

Global Moderator
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jul 26, 2011
Messages
3,492
Likes
779
#19
Hilarious long post,Tony! I have had those colonoscopys for years. The first ones were done awake just in the primary care doctor's office. They didn't go in as deep back then. The last 3 or 4 have been fully asleep. One time they did not quite get me fully asleep,and I was helpless but felt the procedure. So,every time, I caution them that I am a large person,so be sure to get me ALL the way asleep. So far since then,they have.

What I hate is the day long prep,and that stuff you have to drink gets really revolting. Beef and chicken bullion gets very tiresome too. Every time I go back,I have 1 more polyp than last time. Had 4 this time. So far though,no cancer.

I already had prostate cancer at age 57,so I know I am not immune.
 

eightball

Active User
Registered
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
226
Likes
17
#20
I hate the prep also, but the prep i took was an 8oz bottle you mixed in a 12 or 16 oc cup. Wish i could remember the name. you follow it up by drinking 2 more full cups of plain water within 45 minutes. all this is from memory. Anyway seems like you do it again the following morning . I did the same prep b4 my colonoscopy as i did the night b4 my surgery. Im sure your doctor will know the name of it. Please dont put this off. My colon was clean but the cancer in my rectum was so large they barely got the probe through my rectum into my colon. I went through radiation and chemo every week day for a month to try and shrink the tumor. 6 weeks later i had my surgeries. That was nov 20 2013. They first removed a small bellon button tumor i had. Then because they were there, i suppose, they removed my appendix. Then then started with the cancer in my rectum. when they got my margins clear, because they kept checking and removing more tissue til it was, I had no sphincter muscle left. They took my entire rectum out , so then thet had to do a colostimy on me. Two days later my surgeon came and told me that my pathologist results couldnt have been any better. My margins were all clear ,and my lymph nodes were clear. I am not quite over this as i am still doing chemo treatments just as a precation because they shrank the tumor b4 they removed it. I have 10 weeks to go with this chemo.After 7 mos, i finally returned to work. It feels great. And trust me this ostimy bag is no big deal. I feel better now than i did a year ago. I carry a small backpack with a change of clothes and ostimy supplies with me whever i go. I usally have this in my car. At work i have an ostimy kit and a change of clothes there. I have never needed the clothes but i am always prepared. It's just part of my life now. My surgeon told me if i hadnt of went in i woulda prolly had 2 years top to live. And with a few weeks the cancer would have been in my lymph nodes, then its just a matter of time, with chemo the rest of your life. So i really consider my self lucky in a way. The most humbling thing I have ever seen is small children alot worse than me.Never had a chance to experience life. If I can help anyone with this, feel free to pm me. For some reason its a whole lot easier talking to someone who has/had cancer. You get past all that sympathy stuff. My surgeon had a very direct and honest attitude. Warned me of all the possible outcomes, and I was prepared for the worst. He didnt sugarcoat anything. I personally liked that.
 
Last edited:

dickr

Active User
Registered
Joined
Feb 18, 2012
Messages
257
Likes
9
#21
Great story Tony ! Maybe you should be a professional colonoscopy advisor. So many people think it'll be the other guy/gal. There really is no discomfort anymore unless you call the yummy prep drink so. It's such a simple procedure to prevent a horrible situation.
Also we should thank Tony for asking for moral support and making more folks aware of it.
I might send The other Tony's story to my oldest son. He just won't do it yet.
Good health to you Tony, sounds like you're on the upside now.
dickr
 

core-oil

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 30, 2010
Messages
430
Likes
189
#22
Tony ,

you are in my thoughts & I prayers, Keep your spirits up, The guys on the forum will be with you as well
 

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#23
Thank You, I am doing well ,esp compared to some I am taking treatments with. And have seen a few pass away I was taking treatments with .
It is sort of a sad place, The treatment center.
I am Actually glad they are able to take this bag off me.
I think it is somewhat of a nuisance. There are times I am emptying it every 5 minuets.
And it is hard when you are out sometimes.
Looking in trash cans for an old container to thin the contents out before emptying.
But All in all I can say I was pretty lucky through it all.
And it is true, you don't think it will happen to you.
 

d.brown

Active User
Registered
Joined
Nov 16, 2013
Messages
38
Likes
0
#24
It is sort of a sad place, The treatment center.
It can be, I spent many a Wed. there with my wife but a lot of good work is done there too. Being positive is strong medicine & only you can supply it. The Dr. said he got it all & the chemo is insurance.....believe it! Don't hesitate to continue to request prayer here & other places. Everyone gets down now & then especially when we're going through trying times.

David
 

Dave Smith

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 10, 2013
Messages
1,054
Likes
225
#25
Tony--my prayers are for you and your good health--Remember Jesus is the greatest healer of all and all we have to do is ask--He is always listening to us and is no respector of persons------Dave
 

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#26
Thank you all,
 

Brain Coral

Active User
Registered
Joined
Jul 26, 2013
Messages
582
Likes
397
#27
Hi Tony,

I am so glad for you that your surgery and results were positive. You will be in my prayers tonight... :)

God bless you...

Brian :)
 

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#28
Thank You Brian.
I am still hanging in there, did have the reversal, this last operation was sort of hard on me.

Just read yesterday another woman l was taking treatments with passed away, she way only around my age, mid fifty's, well, I will be 59 this year.
Hoping I can get SS to allow me to stay on disability. I have a review in December.
I just do not feel up to going back to work, I got peripheral neuropathy now from the treatments, and will not be able to take the cold.
Plus being close to retirement age. I have
plus, l don't know if it was the IV, but there is something wrong with my right arm now after this last surgery.
 
Last edited:

mcostello

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2013
Messages
367
Likes
166
#29
DON'T do like I did and forget the appointment until about midnight. "Medicine " was supposed to start at 9:00 Pm, did not remember on time. Called the Doc at midnight and He said to take a DOUBLE dose. Everything "came out ok in the end.":lmao: Bet I don't forget the next time.
 

mrbreezeet1

Active User
Registered
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
725
Likes
10
#30
DON'T do like I did and forget the appointment until about midnight. "Medicine " was supposed to start at 9:00 Pm, did not remember on time. Called the Doc at midnight and He said to take a DOUBLE dose. Everything "came out ok in the end.":lmao: Bet I don't forget the next time.
OK, I won't next time.
A lot has happened since then.
I just worry about the cancer returning.
That is my big worry right now, that and battling the elements if they don't allow me to stay on disability.
Thank you for everyone's support.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top