Hendey Lathe Refurbish

francist

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In the grander scheme of that machine and weighing the other available options, I’d say that was a pretty reasonable approach and nothing to feel bad about.

I’m liking how this rebuild is coming together, you’re doing a great job of it.

-frank
 

682bear

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Thanks for the support.... I'm really enjoying figuring all of this out...

To remove the fixed shaft and access the small bearing reservoir, I bored a piece of bronze to fit the shaft and broached a keyway in it. I then keyed it to the shaft and put a 24 inch adjustable wrench on it for motivation...

20201229_120431.jpg

But... it's not moving... I may not be able to get this shaft out.

Before I risk bending the shaft (which would probably mean machining it out) I think I will try flushing the reservoir through one of the existing holes first. If I can get it clean, I shouldn't have to remove that shaft at all. I just don't know if I can get enough volume of the degreaser through the smaller hole to do any good.

It's worth a try, though.

Stay tuned!

-Bear
 

hman

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I noticed that there's a notch in the bushing(?) where the shaft goes into the casting. If there's a second notch on the opposite side, it may well be that the bushing can be removed with a spanner. And maybe there's a shoulder on the shaft, captured by the bushing, holding it in place.
 

mattthemuppet2

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I wouldn't call that a hack at all, very sensible approach in my opinion. For the clutch I probably would have put the bronze sleeve in the bore and a steel sleeve on the shaft, but I don't know how accessible the oil hole for the sleeve would have been to drill it out. I would put a couple of shallow longitudinal grooves on the bronze sleeve, help that oil get to the rest of the shaft.

No ideas on how to remove that shaft (other than to plumb it and use your parts cleaner again), but you do seem to have an excess of bronze lying around. If you'd like to swap it for some steel let me know, I have lots :)
 

682bear

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I noticed that there's a notch in the bushing(?) where the shaft goes into the casting. If there's a second notch on the opposite side, it may well be that the bushing can be removed with a spanner. And maybe there's a shoulder on the shaft, captured by the bushing, holding it in place.
There is no bushing... it is made in one piece... there is not a second notch, either... the groove is not for a key, it is actually to carry oil, as far as I can tell... I had to replace this shaft on my 12" Hendey because it had been bent. It was extremely tight on the 12" lathe and I basically destroyed it getting it out. I'd rather not do that on this one.

-Bear
 

682bear

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I wouldn't call that a hack at all, very sensible approach in my opinion. For the clutch I probably would have put the bronze sleeve in the bore and a steel sleeve on the shaft, but I don't know how accessible the oil hole for the sleeve would have been to drill it out. I would put a couple of shallow longitudinal grooves on the bronze sleeve, help that oil get to the rest of the shaft.

There is actually a longitudinal groove inside the bore that the shaft rides in, which is why I opted to sleeve the shaft instead. I would have had to bore the hole MUCH bigger to get past that groove... maybe as much as .250"...

-Bear
 

682bear

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There are 2 big issues with removing the fixed shaft... It is threaded in, but the threads are machined to be an extremely tight fit... and second, some were made with right hand threads, some were left hand threads... and there is no way to know which it has until you get it to move- one direction or the other.

My 12" Hendey had 1"-18 tpi right hand threads... this one may have left hand threads... I tried to turn it both directions, but couldn't get it to move either way.

I was hoping it wasn't as tight as the one on the smaller lathe... now I'll try not to have to remove it.

-Bear
 

hman

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There is no bushing... it is made in one piece... there is not a second notch, either... the groove is not for a key, it is actually to carry oil, as far as I can tell... I had to replace this shaft on my 12" Hendey because it had been bent. It was extremely tight on the 12" lathe and I basically destroyed it getting it out. I'd rather not do that on this one.
-Bear
Durn! So much for an otherwise bright idea ...
 

682bear

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Today, I finished flushing the oil reservoirs... I went ahead and drilled and tapped the other drain hole out to install a hose barb... from what I can see, they both look fairly clean, but I really can't see in there much... it will have to do. There is just not much else I can do with it without removing the bearings.

I took the headstock casting outside and sprayed it down with degreaser and then pressure washed it... I threaded a couple of pressure washer fittings into the drain holes on the reservoirs, plugged the wand into the fittings, and flushed the reservoirs with water. There was no noticeable dirt or gunk that came out, so maybe they are somewhat clean.

While the casting is thoroughly drying, I'm working on test fitting the feed reversing clutch assembly... I've been a little worried that I didn't get the shaft bore machined straight, which would prevent the shaft from sliding through both bevel gears without binding.

20201231_164847.jpg

It slid right in and turns smoothly, so I must have managed to get it aligned very close to the other bore... there is not much wiggle room with that shaft. It fits both bores very close.

The clutch output shaft is retained on the inside end by a collar, a bolt and a pin. The pin is mounted in the collar and slips into a hole in the shaft... the pin prevents the turning of the shaft from backing the bolt out...

20201231_165027.jpg

As you can see, someone at some point has tightened the collar down without the pin being in the hole and bent the pin flat against the collar. That is an easy fix...

20201231_165058.jpg

I drove the bent pin out and replaced it with a new ⅛" pin.

Also, the lug on the inner bevel gear was missing. I used a piece of ¾" square steel and machined a new one...

20201231_164922.jpg

Both bevel gears are now ready for final installation...

20201231_171434.jpg

-Bear
 
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