Holding a cylinder vertically for milling

SilverWorker

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Hi, I'm new to machining and I'm trying to hold steel drill rod (diameter between 1/4 inch and 1 inch) vertically for machining the ends to make embossing dies. The machining will be done with very small end mills (about 1mm diameter) so there is not a lot of force on the workpiece. I'm wondering what you would recommend to hold these cylinders? I don't currently have any tools for holding them (or even know what tools to use!) beside some nuts and bolts. I do have a small table top TAIG mill and lathe, so I can face the ends of the drill rod as well as machine aluminum fixtures. Any advice is appreciated! Thanks!
 

7HC

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Hi, I'm new to machining and I'm trying to hold steel drill rod (diameter between 1/4 inch and 1 inch) vertically for machining the ends to make embossing dies. The machining will be done with very small end mills (about 1mm diameter) so there is not a lot of force on the workpiece. I'm wondering what you would recommend to hold these cylinders? I don't currently have any tools for holding them (or even know what tools to use!) beside some nuts and bolts. I do have a small table top TAIG mill and lathe, so I can face the ends of the drill rod as well as machine aluminum fixtures. Any advice is appreciated! Thanks!

Hold the rod in two small 'V' blocks in the vise?

M
 

jamie76x

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You can use V blocks to hold the piece ... The advantage of clamping a work piece in the v block is that you can take the block out, lay it flat, turn it 90 degrees, hold it at an angle, move it from machine to machine etc etc all without disturbing the orientation of the work in the block.

Option #2 is to make a specific rear jaw for your milling vise with 1 or more V cut into it to hold at a right angle. If this is a job you will do often and you only have to hold the pieces one way and in one machine, this works great.
 

Bill C.

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Hi, I'm new to machining and I'm trying to hold steel drill rod (diameter between 1/4 inch and 1 inch) vertically for machining the ends to make embossing dies. The machining will be done with very small end mills (about 1mm diameter) so there is not a lot of force on the workpiece. I'm wondering what you would recommend to hold these cylinders? I don't currently have any tools for holding them (or even know what tools to use!) beside some nuts and bolts. I do have a small table top TAIG mill and lathe, so I can face the ends of the drill rod as well as machine aluminum fixtures. Any advice is appreciated! Thanks!

Some tool-maker vises have V slots built in their jaws. If you use V blocks you place them against the fixed end of the vise. You probably need a spacer to hold the 1/4" dia. stock. Good Luck
 
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4GSR

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I have a 3-jaw chuck dedicated to holding round stock in the mill. I have several parts I build that have deep end slots and this is the only way you can hold the part without it getting away from you. I just mount the chuck flat down to the mill table.
 

george wilson

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NO!! NOT like the Enco pictures!!!! Those are laminated V blocks. They have stacked layers of steel and aluminum. They are for setting on top of a magnetic chuck. The magnetic flux is carried up through the laminations to hold a piece in the V groove while it is being ground in a surface grinder. Get SOLID STEEL V blocks. Those laminated ones would fall apart if used in the vise and subjected to the much more severe pressure of the vise. Their layers are only riveted together as you can see in the pictures.
 

churchjw

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NO!! NOT like the Enco pictures!!!! Those are laminated V blocks. They have stacked layers of steel and aluminum. They are for setting on top of a magnetic chuck. The magnetic flux is carried up through the laminations to hold a piece in the V groove while it is being ground in a surface grinder. Get SOLID STEEL V blocks. Those laminated ones would fall apart if used in the vise and subjected to the much more severe pressure of the vise. Their layers are only riveted together as you can see in the pictures.


Thanks for saying that George. I have a set of these I use on my mag chuck with my surface grinder and I have wondered if its ok to use them in a regular vise. One of those things where you just grab any v block to get the job done. Now I know not to do that.

Jeff
 

TomS

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Thanks for saying that George. I have a set of these I use on my mag chuck with my surface grinder and I have wondered if its ok to use them in a regular vise. One of those things where you just grab any v block to get the job done. Now I know not to do that.

Jeff

You could also drill and ream a set of soft jaws to hold round stock. First install your soft jaws and then tighten them with a piece of shim stock, say .005" but most any thickness will work, between the jaws. Center the spindle directly over the jaws where they clamp together and drill and ream a hole the size of the material you are trying to hold. Remove the shim stock and you are ready to go. You can drill and ream as many holes as you want to hold multiple pieces.

Tom S
 
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