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Winner Homemade Lathe Build Log

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Andre

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#31
Ah. Well, you may think about buying one, although I really don't know if they make t-slot cutters or woodruff key cutters that small, or that are cheap.

Marco - you're welcome. The guy that runs that site has a lot of neat stuff on it, all kinds of neat little 'chining projects.
That's the thing....they are not made that small that I know of. And if they did, my mill spindle is too loose for cutters that small. I can flex the spindle (quill up and locked) .005" side to side. It needs a bearing replacement bad! That means I'm also limited on speeds....anything over 750RPM and I'm afraid it's going to take off into space.
 

12bolts

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#32
It's between 1/8" and 3/16
youve certainly displayed the ability for machining. What about a collet adaptor to fit your end mill and a collet holder you have to use the tool you have. A simple split sleeve should suffice

Cheers Phil
 

Don B

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#33
That was the one I was following during the build. I just need to find a way to cut the t slot. I have no endmills I'm willing to carve up. I did make one from a dowel pin that had a T head on it, but after I ground it I found out I didn't have a collet for it! It's between 1/8" and 3/16"....

I still have it, and hope to get around to finish it soon.
Looking real good Andre.......!:))

For your T slot cutter you might consider the tip (drill portion) of a center drill, or a broken drill that still has a little flute left on it, you could shape the undercut portion of the cutter by running it in the mill with a dremel type tool in the vise.:thinking:
 

Andre

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#35
youve certainly displayed the ability for machining. What about a collet adaptor to fit your end mill and a collet holder you have to use the tool you have. A simple split sleeve should suffice

Cheers Phil
My mill taper is #7 Brown and Sharpe. I will make a 1/2" to cutter shank sleeve with a locking screw for it. Just a correction, the cutter shank is between 1/8" and 3/16. Not the cutting part diameter. I will get ans post a picture tomorrow.
 

Andre

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#36
First of all, thank you all for your support and kind words. it's really keeping me going on this project. Thank you :)):))

Okay, not too many pictures tonight but an update none the less.
I got the graver rest (like a toolrest on a wood lathe) almost done and it will be ready to test tomorrow. It's too late tonight to write a lot about what I did but here are some pictures I took today.


Drilling holes...

photo 1 (2).JPG

Slitting....

photo 2.JPG


Drawing VS Part.
photo 3.JPG

Part assembled. I cheated and used an off the shelf knob. Sue me!

photo 4.JPG

Making the graver rest...

photo 5.JPG

Milling the angle with a countersink.

photo (38).JPG

This little graver rest took 2-3 hours to make and it's not done yet. This is after silver soldering and semi-cleanup.

photo (39).JPG

I will get more pictures tomorrow, after the graver rest is complete and the whole thing together.

After I finish the graver rest, make a drawbar, make some collets and bore the spindle taper, I will make a box stand/carry case then lastly finish the cross slide for smaller work. I did fit the male and female parts of the slide I made earlier, just didn't show it.

photo 1 (2).JPG photo 2.JPG photo 3.JPG photo 4.JPG photo 5.JPG photo (38).JPG photo (39).JPG
 

Andre

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#39
Alright everybody, getting near the end here. Everything went well today and even got it running with a sewing machine motor.

This is yesterdays progress, I did drill and tap for the graver rest lock screw this morning though.
Made an oopsie move, too. Went to drill for the lock screw and was over the wrong hole in the part, so I'll have it welded up (by the same guy who gave me my mill) and I'm sure he will have a kick out of this. Make a nice little lathe and center drill the wrong spot!

photo (40).JPG

The oops moment is not shown here. Pictures are arriving very slow because I have a bad wifi here, and emailing them to myself is taking forever. I will finish the update tonight.

Literally the second it took to post whats above the pictures came in. LOL

Here is my oops. Some people say this is a machinist's signature.....So yes, I guessed I signed this one LOL

photo 1 (4).JPG

Here is it with a micrometer for size reference. The bed is 6" long.

photo 2 (2).JPG

And here is the graver rest body all chamfered.

photo 3 (2).JPG

And the test, just facing the end of the spindle here. Will bore and cut the taper for collets later.

Went to a friends shop, he does some small production runs. I showed this lathe to him and he seemed to be impressed.
He also gave me 4' of 3/8" steel rod to make collets for the lathe and 3.5' of 3/4" 6061 alu to make a base. Very nice guy!

That's it for today.

photo (40).JPG photo 1 (4).JPG photo 2 (2).JPG photo 3 (2).JPG
 
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Don B

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#43
Here is my oops. Some people say this is a machinist's signature.....So yes, I guessed I signed this one LOL

View attachment 79882
Those oops monents will will always be present Andre, they may come fewer and further between as the years go by but every now and then you'll be saying to yourself, I can't believe I just did that..!:thinking:
Your lathe looks really good... Keep up the good work....!:))
 

Andre

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#44
Those oops monents will will always be present Andre, they may come fewer and further between as the years go by but every now and then you'll be saying to yourself, I can't believe I just did that..!:thinking:
Your lathe looks really good... Keep up the good work....!:))
Thanks!
Yea I know....just a bummer when it happens. It will get wended and refinished sometime, and even though it will not be invisible it will be a lot better than it is now. And I might get to see some TIG welding, only have seen MIG welding, and that was a long time ago.

*************UPDATE*******************


So I'm doing a little work on the cross slide before working on collets. I needed to make some L brackets and only had 3/4" square aluminum. Lets just say hogging out .300" DOP on a rickety bridgeport is an experience for sure! Removing a square inch of material on a single pass is really fun....

Cutting the stock.

photo 1 (5).JPG

This is a mill to the line project, so I'm marking lines with my homemade height gauge. It works very well.

photo 2 (3).JPG

Here's that 0.300" pass :)) The chips sound like broken glass when landing on the exposed Y axis way.

photo 3 (3).JPG

Holes drilled and tapped.

photo 4 (1).JPG

Here is what that L bracket of for, it is the leadscrew nut.

photo 5 (1).JPG

I'm going to work some more on the cross slide, maybe an update later on tonight as well.

photo 1 (5).JPG photo 2 (3).JPG photo 3 (3).JPG photo 4 (1).JPG photo 5 (1).JPG
 

Andre

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#45
Okay, not as much done today as I hoped. But I did make some progress.

Here is a mock-up of how the cross slide will sit on the lathe.

photo 1 (6).JPG

If I was planning ahead when I cut the top pieces of the female slide, I would've made it longer towards the back and bent it down to act as a bracket for the leadscrew to push against. But when I cut it out I procrastinated to figure it out later:angry:

So now I'm making that curved piece. It will be attached by a woodworking style lap joint.

Here is the piece ready to be bent in the vise "brake"

photo 2 (4).JPG

Now that it's bent I'm milling the ends at a 45* angle just for looks. A sketchy setup but it worked.

photo 3 (4).JPG

This is how it will sit on the back.

photo 4 (2).JPG

And this is after the lap joint is cut. I'm thinking of using red locktite to glue this in place, but opinions are very welcome on this!

photo 5 (2).JPG

So now I need a hole in that bracket for the leadscrew. And dummy me I drilled a clearance hole for a 1/4-20 screw not 10-24! I have done that twice today....did it before on the L bracket I made earlier. Good thing that one was a test. So I turned a bushing on my milling machine and I think this will work better than the bare aluminum. A mistake with a bonus.

photo 2 (5).JPG

And here is how the lower slide will look like. Still need to attach the back curve and drill the bushing through.

photo 3 (5).JPG

Thanks for looking!

photo 1 (6).JPG photo 2 (4).JPG photo 3 (4).JPG photo 4 (2).JPG photo 5 (2).JPG photo 2 (5).JPG photo 3 (5).JPG
 

12bolts

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#48
Andre,
I notice you do a lot of "turning" on your mill. Do you not have a lathe?

Cheers Phil
 

Andre

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#49
Andre,
I notice you do a lot of "turning" on your mill. Do you not have a lathe?

Cheers Phil
I do not have a lathe currently, that's why I am building this one to do simple small turning jobs. I only have the materials currently to build one this small and any bigger lathe I build the headstock would have to be line bored.

Turning on the mill is actually very effective, even can take a nice heavy cut. I will use the mill to make all the collets for the lathe and bore the spindle to accept the collet.
 

markknx

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#50
Andre, YesI have turned a few things with my mill before and it worked quite well. I do have a lathe, but sometimes it is set up for something. The first time Idid itwas just to do it because I seen it done.I also somethimes use the spindexer to turn in the mill. This works well for tapers that are not the critical. Mark
 

Andre

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#51
I don't work in the shop on Fridays usually so any work done on Friday is a bonus.

Made a mock spindle and bored it then made a test collet. Worked perfectly, and it fits so well I have to hit the spindle for it to fall out.

Also locktited the bushing to the aluminum back. Hopefully it will hold.

No real need to show this, but I have a picture of it so why not.

photo (41).JPG

photo (41).JPG
 

Andre

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#52
locktiting the bushing in place worked well so I am locktiting the back curve of the slide in place.

photo 1 (7).JPG

Now drilling the spindle to .150"

photo 2 (6).JPG

Hole thankfully is straight as an arrow (not in flight!)

photo 3 (6).JPG

Now I tilted the head to 15* and bored the spindle to get the taper to close the collet. the major diameter of the collet is .250".

photo 4 (3).JPG

Here you can see it's bored out.

photo 5 (3).JPG

Now making some collet blanks.
Still have to machine them down some more.

photo 1 (8).JPG

Before I tilt the head back and tram it, I need to create a master taper so I can set the head back and make more collets or tooling (feels weird saying that for a lathe this small) for it.

photo 2 (7).JPG

Getting tired of turning on the lathe so I wanted to see some chips fly. Started work on the tailstock.

photo 3 (7).JPG

photo 4 (4).JPG

photo 5 (4).JPG

Thanks for looking.

photo 1 (7).JPG photo 2 (6).JPG photo 3 (6).JPG photo 4 (3).JPG photo 5 (3).JPG photo 1 (8).JPG photo 2 (7).JPG photo 3 (7).JPG photo 4 (4).JPG photo 5 (4).JPG
 

Don B

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#53
Before I tilt the head back and tram it, I need to create a master taper so I can set the head back and make more collets or tooling (feels weird saying that for a lathe this small) for it.

View attachment 80002
Now that's thinking ahead......A very essential part of machining.. Good idea....!:))
The little lathe is coming along, and looking good..!:))
 

Andre

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#56
Turned the collet blanks down to their shaft diameter.

Who needs pictures when you can have 30 per second? :))

[video=youtube;bKLk09MkGhY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKLk09MkGhY[/video]

Since there is a bit where the toolbit didn't reach on the last pass I clean them up a bit.

[video=youtube;6LzA0gGf_5k]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LzA0gGf_5k[/video]

Used by height gauge again today, I love using it. Such a timesaver.
 

Andre

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#58
Awesome. Looked like the whole column was moving with the cam on the table
I was moving the knee up and down, and the camera (Ipod, can't you tell from the horrible pics in this thread:))) was sitting in a T slot.

Worked nicely.
 

Andre

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#59
Since I need to drill and tap into the backs of the collets for the 4-40 drawbar, I center drilled the backs of the stubs there still on.

Also did a lot on the tailstock today.

Drilled for the 5/16" tailstock ram, worked on the lock to hold the tailstock in place, and started work on the tailstock ram.


Made a little plug to become a lock. These plugs with the notch take awhile to machine. Easy, but they take awhile.

photo 1 (9).JPG

Some very careful eyeballing a center over a scribe line can get you extremely close. This is a 5/16" shaft on the dot with a 5/16" reamed hole in the tailstock. The spindle slips into the tailstock ram hole perfectly. That means the tailstock is aligned to the spindle probably within a thou or two. Not bad for eyeballing! Okay....I used a 7x Coddington magnifier. But still.

photo 2 (8).JPG

Next I shortened the tailstock because it's too tall. I would've loved to see this turn into chips flying all over but I like to save every bit of metal I can. Comes in handy later.

photo 3 (8).JPG

While knocking the corners off with a countersink I had a little crash. The countersink sucked the tailstock out of the vise and chowderd it up. So I had to cut a little off the side to get rid of the little mistake. Thankfully it happened while I had a good bit left to cut, so there was not much to clean up.

photo 4 (5).JPG

I flycut the sides of the tailstock and it looks really nice.

photo (43).JPG

I don't plan to turn between centers so I don't need to put a lock on the tailstock ram. But I may in case the need comes up or it's future owner wants too.

Have left to do:

1. Finish tailstock
2. Make stand
3. Make box/motor mount
4. Finish cross slide
5. Toolpost for cross slide
6. Make flatbelt pulleys and some flat belts (flat belts transfer more torque than a V or round belt with less friction)
7. Cut keyway in round bed for tailstock alignment.

photo 1 (9).JPG photo 2 (8).JPG photo 3 (8).JPG photo 4 (5).JPG photo (43).JPG
 
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