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When I stated, "You missed your calling", I went by your signature, "Grease Monkey by Trade". The work you produce is well above "Grease Monkey" level. There are very few that can produce work like you do when they start out. You are a gifted individual.

"Billy G"
 

John Hasler

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I missed my calling? I plan to go to a 2 year community college to get a bachelor degree then to a machining trade school. That is if competitive shooting doesn't get in the way.
You don't want to go to engineering school?
 
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Andre

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When I stated, "You missed your calling", I went by your signature, "Grease Monkey by Trade". The work you produce is well above "Grease Monkey" level. There are very few that can produce work like you do when they start out. You are a gifted individual.

"Billy G"
Thank you very much Bill! :))

My signature "Grease monkey by trade" is a little saying that came up because my hands are always dirty. Even if I'm doing inspection or other "clean" work they always seem to end up dirty.
 
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Andre

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You don't want to go to engineering school?
My grandfather was an engineer at Xerox, and prior almost worked at IBM. He was very smart, had me doing algebra I don't even know now when I was 8.

Just a little story here, we have a creek in our yard about 20 feet wide and 35 feet wide when it overflows during a heavy rainstorm. The tree had to be long, at least 30 feet, and with 50 acres of woods there are a lot of trees to choose from to build the bridge out of. We needed two logs, one for each side of the bridge. We found two good trees, but had to find out how tall they were before they were cut down.

And not having a ladder tall enough, he taught me an equation to figure out how tall the trees are from shadows of the sun during a certain point in space. At 12'oclock, knowing the angle of the sun, measuring the shadows gave an equation and it turned out to be within two feet or so. I fully understood the equation at 8 or so. I look back at the equation that's written on a piece of plexiglass, don't remember it but it just is a homage to how smart he was an his dedication to teach.

I'd rather be a machinist than an engineer. Absolutely nothing wrong with engineering, I have serious respect for engineers. But I'd rather be making things with my hands, it really gives me something to think about and enjoy what I make and it's something really enjoyable to me. That's what I like about working by myself, for myself. I get to do all the thinking, draft it out on a drafting table so I can take the print to the shop, cut material, machine it, finish it, and enjoy the end product.

The way engineering is going now is not what it used to be. If engineering was the way it used to be when my grandfather was working, I might want to be an engineer; but it's all computerized now and I don't want to be in front of a computer all day if I can help it.
 
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The Engineer puts it on paper, the Machinist makes it work. I always felt that part of a Machinists job was to make Engineers look good, they never proved me wrong. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

"Billy G"
 

jumps4

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congratulations Andre

You have a promising future ahead of yourself If you can place this much attention into a project at 14.
Job well done and keep posting your progress as you go
steve
 

Rick Leslie

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First let me say that this thread didn't grab me to start with. I would come back and catch up from time to time and as the project matured, I found the quality and scope of the project very intriguing. When I read that you're "14, going on 15" (I remember those days) I had to read it twice. The work is on par with many seasoned machinists. The scope of the project is more ambitious than most care to tackle. Your planning, execution and documentation show advancement well beyond your years.

But what caught my eye more than that was your attitude and outlook. For years I've worked in the engineering department of a local utility. I work with professional engineers every day and have never cared to do what they do. Your observation put into words what I've always felt: that hands-on was much more satisfying. Your attitude about your work is far beyond your years. Please keep that passion in whatever you do. Clearly your calling in in the mechanical field.
 

John Hasler

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I think that by the time you graduate the only "machinist" job you will be able to find will be programming machining centers and 3D printers. You will still spend all day in front of a computer but the engineers will already have done all the fun parts. A few years later that job will disappear as the software gets smart enough to interpret the engineer's drawings directly.

There is a lot more to engineering than sitting at a computer dimensioning widgets in Autocad. The best engineering jobs consist of inventing things and solving novel problems. You also often get to do a lot of experimental work yourself. Most of the design work on things like CERN's Large Hadron Collider and NASA's Curiousity Mars rover was done by engineers. You might even find that university broadens your horizons enough to make you consider going into science.

And you can still have a shop full of old manual machines in your garage.
 

uncle harry

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The Engineer puts it on paper, the Machinist makes it work. I always felt that part of a Machinists job was to make Engineers look good, they never proved me wrong. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

"Billy G"
To my way of thinking every engineer should spend at least 6 months to a year learning shop procedures & capabilities before producing his first drawing. When you crawl around machines or have to assemble them you gain an incentive to actually practice the K.I.S.S. formula. Some of the best designs can start on napkins or flight sickness bags.
 
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Andre

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congratulations Andre

You have a promising future ahead of yourself If you can place this much attention into a project at 14.
Job well done and keep posting your progress as you go
steve
Thank you, Steve!

- - - Updated - - -

First let me say that this thread didn't grab me to start with. I would come back and catch up from time to time and as the project matured, I found the quality and scope of the project very intriguing. When I read that you're "14, going on 15" (I remember those days) I had to read it twice. The work is on par with many seasoned machinists. The scope of the project is more ambitious than most care to tackle. Your planning, execution and documentation show advancement well beyond your years.

But what caught my eye more than that was your attitude and outlook. For years I've worked in the engineering department of a local utility. I work with professional engineers every day and have never cared to do what they do. Your observation put into words what I've always felt: that hands-on was much more satisfying. Your attitude about your work is far beyond your years. Please keep that passion in whatever you do. Clearly your calling in in the mechanical field.
Rick, thank you!
 

rdean

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Amazing job!
Very nice!

Engineers can draw anything but it takes craftsman to build it.

Keep up the good work.

Ray
 

John Hasler

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Amazing job!
Very nice!

Engineers can draw anything but it takes craftsman to build it.

Keep up the good work.

Ray
Draftsmen draw. Engineers design.

Sometimes they are one and the same, of course. But then sometimes engineer, draftsman, and craftsman are all one person.
 
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Andre

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Made a new thrust bushing. The old one was factory made from something. The yellow rust-free coating was really bugging me. Simple part and fun to make.
I will shorten the front bearing to bring the bushing a little closer to the headstock so it will look a little better.

New on left, old on right.

photo (64).JPG

photo (64).JPG
 
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Andre

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Did a lot of work today on collets and workholding. Bored the spindle taper to a very clean taper, used a fatter boring bar than when boring the tailstock spindle so there was less flex and a nicer finish. It was "perfect" off the machine. As good of a surface finish as I could've asked for. But as soon as you touch it it turns grey!!!! Ahhh!!!
Made a nice collet to test, worked great. Have to make 4 more for a small set. Also need a drawbar.

Boring the spindle taper. Make sure your boring bar is on center with neutral rake angle or you will get a "false" taper.

photo 1 (26).JPG

Spindle taper closeup....a blurry closeup. Sorry for the multitude of bad pictures in this thread, I will try to use a better camera soon.

photo 2 (27).JPG

Made a collet, .182" collet bore and 4-40 threads in the back. If your wondering why a .182" bore, it's the perfect size for those political "vote for me" signs. Dad ran for town supervisor for awhile but never got elected so we have a hundred or so here plus other peoples. Great mild steel stock, and perfect size work for this lathe.

photo 3 (20).JPG

And here it is in the lathe. Tapers match real nice, and the collet has perfect leaf tension. Enough to be squished by hand but not too stiff or it will not grab the part. Worked out nicely.

photo 4 (17).JPG

Making a drawbar using some of that political sign material. Since my 109 won't thread 4-40 because I don't have the right change gears, and they are $11 a gear from HSS, I drilled and tapped 4-40 and used an inserted screw to make the male threads. I've done this on several parts before and it's worked great.

photo 5 (16).JPG

Here is a closeup of the drawbar threads, I know they look bent but that's just refraction from the eye loupe I was using as a camera lense.

photo (65).JPG

Thanks for looking!

photo 1 (26).JPG photo 2 (27).JPG photo 3 (20).JPG photo 4 (17).JPG photo 5 (16).JPG photo (65).JPG
 

Don B

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Looks great Andre, keep up the excellent work..........:))
 
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Andre

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Looks great Andre, keep up the excellent work..........:))
Thanks Don! How has he house painting been going? Hope something comes along and helps you feel better.

Andre
 

cazclocker

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Holy guacamole! I just found this thread. Way to go! As a near-daily user of a watchmaker's lathe, I'm following this thread with a lot of interest. Will you be making your own hardened & lapped headstock spindle too? In any case, keep us posted!
Thanks!
...Doug
 

mygoggie

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Man, this is cool! Allow me (as an engineer) to say that I am proud of you even though we have never met!! Remember that the art of turning a design into a working product is to never allow your dreams to be stopped ...
 
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Andre

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Holy guacamole! I just found this thread. Way to go! As a near-daily user of a watchmaker's lathe, I'm following this thread with a lot of interest. Will you be making your own hardened & lapped headstock spindle too? In any case, keep us posted!
Thanks!
...Doug
What watchmakers lathe do you have? And do you use it for watchmaking or just for projects in general?

I didn't even know real watchmakers lathe spindles were lapped. The piece I used for the spindle was from a printer/copier/xerox machine thing. I's dead nuts round, probably within 1-3 tenths or so if any. I believe it is ground stock, but if not it's still very round. As for hardening, probably not. This steel is not hardenable and most likely leaded. This steel when turning is like cast iron, and it's chips are mostly dust. It machines better than 12l14 and is the best machining steel you will EVER find!

Thanks for your interest! Pics of your lathe would be greatly appreciated, too. I really like the concept of watchmakers lathes, small, extremely overbuilt, and made to last 5 lifetimes.
 
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Andre

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Man, this is cool! Allow me (as an engineer) to say that I am proud of you even though we have never met!! Remember that the art of turning a design into a working product is to never allow your dreams to be stopped ...
Thank you very much!
 
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Andre

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Got the collet system working today!

Made the drawbar, and tested out the collets. They work like a charm! Grip nice and tight, no wiggle, and run almost perfectly true. I do have to remake the wood drawbar knob though, I don't like the way it turned out.

Here is the drawbar and collet outside of the lathe.

photo 1 (27).JPG

And if anybody is wondering, this is how the wood knob is held on. I set my Craftsman 109 to the coarsest pitch with the gears I have for it and went to town.
(Hey Don, this is what I was asking about using locktite for)

photo 2 (28).JPG


And here it is in the lathe's spindle.

photo 4 (18).JPG

And another shot.

If your wondering, that's my Feinwekbau 700 in the background. I use my "gunsmithing" bench for taking pictures because there is real good lighting there and I didn't feel like moving it before taking the picture.
photo 5 (17).JPG

And here is a collet next to a SV .22lr cartridge for size comparison. (A .22lr (non stinger) is almost 1" exactly)

photo 3 (21).JPG


And here is gripping a piece of steel rod.

photo (66).JPG

It's coming together! Slowly but surely.

photo 1 (27).JPG photo 2 (28).JPG photo 4 (18).JPG photo 5 (17).JPG photo 3 (21).JPG photo (66).JPG
 

Don B

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(Hey Don, this is what I was asking about using locktite for)

View attachment 83948
If you used the red color permanent Loctite (I think it's number 262) and it was cleaned well it will never move, if it's the blue (I think it's number 242) then I would pin it as well.

Looking really good Andre, your homemade collets turned out great, it's hard to make small stuff like that accurately, well done......:))
 
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Andre

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Nicely done! What sort of collets are you using?
...Doug
I made the collets, but they are very similar in size to a dremel collet. A little fatter at the top and steel instead of aluminum like a dremel collet.
 
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Andre

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If you used the red color permanent Loctite (I think it's number 262) and it was cleaned well it will never move, if it's the blue (I think it's number 242) then I would pin it as well.

Looking really good Andre, your homemade collets turned out great, it's hard to make small stuff like that accurately, well done......:))

Thank you!

It's red locktite, the bottle (ancient from Xerox) is labeled with one number, and a sharpie mark with another number LOL so it's been refilled a few times. I doubt the stuff in it is what the sharpie mark says, but it's red and really strong. I think I will pin it just to be sure, I may have to take it apart again anyway to shorten it up a little so I'll do that last.
 

kd4gij

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I always heard it took an Engineer to realy screw things up.:roflmao: I have seen some realy strange things on prints.
 

John Hasler

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I always heard it took an Engineer to realy screw things up.
That's right. We take classes in it. Mere tradesmen can't properly bungle a job: they can't handle the math.

When it is really important to get things wrong, though, bring in a consultant with a PhD.
 
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