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How Did You Handle Getting Your Lathe Home?

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Holescreek

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#1
I've been selling "extra" equipment off all summer trying to make a space large enough for a new gunsmith lathe and I'm just about ready to place an order for a 13"x40" G0709. The only reason (well, one of them) I haven't already ordered is that I don't know how the shipping works. Grizzly will ship the lathe for $255 but they don't specify how it's delivered, how close they'll get it to the shop, or equipment necessary (forklift?) to consummate the delivery. Having a semi show up at the end of the driveway (even with a lift gate) won't do much for me if I can't get it up the driveway into the shop in a reasonable amount of time.

I could pull my trailer for a 16 hour round trip and pick it up but even with low fuel prices the shipping option would save my time (and I'd still need to get it off my trailer). At least I'd be in control in that situation, not at the mercy of the shipping company for scheduling and equipment rental.

The FAQ page on the Grizzly site suggests picking it up at the shipper's terminal but that's hard to plan if you don't know who the shipper is and how close it is to home.

So what have you done, what are your experiences?
 

JimDawson

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#2
Not knowing the layout of your property It's kind of difficult to say what the best way is. Normally local lift gate delivery's are done with a smaller truck that could back into a residential driveway. The truck will have a pallet jack. The shipping weight is stated at 1550# so not too heavy to move around on a pallet jack. If the driver can back up near your shop door, just rolling it in on the pallet jack is the easy way. Once you find out who the shipping company is, give them a call and explain your situation. They'll most likely send out a smaller truck.

The freight terminal should be more or less local, so you could go pick it up from there. In that case, I would recommend a drop deck trailer from your local rental place. On Saturday I moved a 3500# mill on a drop deck, we just set the lip of the trailer just inside the garage door and drug it off the trailer with a come-along. 2x6 skids were lag screwed to the base. We anchored the come-along to the bollard in front of the water heater in this case, but a bolt in the floor would work too. I used a 2x4 across a door frame as an anchor point to skid a 2000# mill across the floor.

IMG_0594.jpg

If you went to get it from the freight terminal with your trailer, you might be able to pick it off of there with an engine hoist. Or skid it down a ramp while still on the pallet.

Moving 1500# of lathe is pretty easy, but remember, lathes are top heavy. Lift from the top when removing from the pallet. Plan your moves, think about what could go wrong and plan for that. Make sure that you are never in a position where you could get trapped by anything in case of a disaster.

Good luck! We'll be waiting for pictures of your new toy,,,,er tool;)
.
.
 

tomh

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#3
"won't do much for me if I can't get it up the driveway into the shop"

The key seems to be word is up so I assume that the drive is up hill or up a grade?

Call grizzly and ask who will deliver it and find the terminal location, call and ask what type truck they will use if it's a short truck aka a 6 wheeler or a pup short trailer. Every time overfright freight delivers to me they show up with a 55' van :( so at the least you will know right off what you can or can't do.
If you have to pick it up, the terminal will load it on your trailer so don't pay for lift gate till you find out as the terminal should be no charge for loading on your trailer. The dimensions of the lathe is roughly 6'L x 5'H so keep that in mind if going to get it.
Tomh
 

Texas74

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#4
Grizzly have a YouTube channel with the shipping info they said that the truck come to the curb and the driver will unload it their and you have to do the rest but if your driver wants to help you push it UP the driveway that his discretion good luck
 

Baithog

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#5
I got a mill/drill and lathe from Grizzly last year. They were significantly smaller than your machine, ~400#. They were delivered by UPS Freight on a lift truck. My driveway is uphill and the driver and I pushed them up and into the shop on his pallet jack. He would not have been able to back into the drive because of the available turning radius, so I didn't ask.

Pushing 1500# uphill ain't gonna happen and I'm not sure the driver will want to hang around long enough to pull the pallet jack up the drive with a winch or lawn tractor.
 

Uglydog

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#6
All of the above is great.
However, bear in mind that lathes also tip. It's an awful feeling watching her roll and knowing you can't catch #1500.
Preplan everything.

Daryl
MN
 

RJSakowski

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#7
I have had two large pieces delivered by Grizzly. They ship by freight which in my case meant semi. I had ordered lift gate service for the delivery. Otherwise, I would have been responsible for unloading the items (a cabinet saw and a lathe) myself. They backed the semi off the road and dropped the items on the lift gate to ground level. I used my tractor to then move the freight from my driveway.

Several years before, at work, we ordered a lathe and a mill from grizzly. We didn't have a loading dock so they were dropped off outside our large door where we were responsible for moving it in.

The bottom line, is it would be very similar to you transporting the machine by yourself except that if you were to do it, you would probably use a trailer that was capable of getting much closer to its final resting place.
From what I have seen on the freight company documents and Grizzly's site, the drivers are not permitted to assist you in maneuvering the machine to a safe place although it has been my experience that they will help.

If you have a particularly difficult layout, it may be better to have the freight company hold the machine at their warehouse and you pick it up from there. Be aware that they most likely have a loading dock and may not have any means of loading into a vehicle or trailer whose bed is much lower than their dock height.
Grizzly does do a good job of crating and palleting their products though so you should have a secure package to move about. I would expect that it would be delivered as a single package which would mean a top heavy package.

Bob
 

middle.road

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#8
Helps to have a skidsteer handy. An acquaintance of ours keeps his over at our place.
A 14x40 just barely fits in the bucket. This was the 2nd attempt. The initial pickup at auction
was done by fork truck and straps onto the same trailer. Then my truck sucked #3 cylinder getting
on the freeway. This was picking it up at the repair shop.
20130124_181200r.jpg
When I got it home we put it on pipes and scooted it into the shop.
There's also the option of renting a set of forks for the SS, I've done that a few times.
 

Holescreek

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#9
I sold a 3500# T&C grinder several weeks ago and the buyer rented a forklift to get it onto his trailer from a local rental company. We used the forklift for a grand total of 5 minutes at a cost of $150. I've used drop deck trailers many times to move large lathes for other people, it's actually what I used to the the 3500# T&C grinder into my shop years ago. I also called a towing company once to send a wrecker with a boom over to lift a bridgeport off my trailer, that was a fast $100. If I buy some slings for the lathe that could be another option.

I found a thread here last night that gave good detail on receiving a G0709 and it said that the lathe is too heavy for a lift gate so a terminal/forklift would be the way to go if I get it shipped.

Yes, my driveway has a long uphill grade. If it wasn't for my shop and the tonnage inside we would have moved away from here long ago. If I had a place to store it I would've bought a forklift by now.
 

middle.road

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#10
Why is it that the grade of the driveway/access seems to be negatively proportional to the amount of equipment
in the shop? The more equipment the steeper the grade...
:grin:
 

David VanNorman

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#11
Most freight companies have away to get your freight on to a pickup or a low trailer.
 

wawoodman

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#12
I had a lathe delivered to the freight terminal. I went down and got it with a rented truck with a lift gate, and then I humped it into the shop with a palette jack and a helper. Pain in the butt.

When I got my mill, I had it delivered to a local rigger. They brought it to me on a their truck, towing a fork lift. Set it right on the floor inside the garage door, then moved it right where I wanted it. I stood there and watched.

Cost not much more, and one heck of a lot simpler.

Work smarter, not harder!
 
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#13
Get yourself a friend with a trailer....they come in handy once in awhile :)
 

ch2co

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#14
Uglydog said "It's an awful feeling watching her roll and knowing you can't catch #1500.

Almost happened to me, caught it just before it toppled too far. Being an old codger I decided that hauling that thing out of the truck, across the back lawn, down a flight of narrow stairs into my basement, around two corners into the shop was going to be just a tad more trouble than I anticipated. Being that most of my very helpful friends were old codgers too, I caved, and ended up calling a local moving company who performed admirably. Cost an extra 100, but well worth the price, a lot cheaper than a trip to the hospital or a munched machine.

CHuck the grumpy old guy
 

kd4gij

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#17
When Grizzly ships it they will email the info of the shipper. The shipping company will call with a delivery and set up day and approximant time. Mine was ups freight witch had a lift gate on a semi. They loaded it into the back of my pickup.
 

Cheeseking

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#19
I like the idea Mike suggested of shipping to a local rigger and paying them to deliver and place in your garage or wherever. Won't be inexpensive. Next best option is deliver to the nearest freight terminal and go pick it up with your trailer. They will set it on the trailer for you. Once you get home you can take your time and figure the best method of unloading. You could always take it apart pc by pc into manageable chunks and re-assemble.
I picked up my 11x30 lathe from freight terminal and unloaded using an 2T engine hoist. I only lifted it high enough to be able to pull the trailer out from under and quickly lower it to a waiting dolly. Lathe was about 1,000# yours might be more. The threat of the whole crane tipping forward was obvious. I ended up blocking under the legs and added several hundred pounds of ballast to the back of it. Not pretty or advisable but it held for the 30 seconds it was hanging as the trailer pulled out.
 
T

TOOLMASTER

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#21
I MISS having an engine hoist around. if i had more room i would build another.
 

Cheeseking

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#22
Fortunately it disassembles down to reasonable pcs. but yea it does take up space most of its life.
 

kd4gij

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#23
Get the freight company to load it on your trailer. Then rent the little skid steer from Home depot.
 

Uglydog

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#24
Note: the ratings for skid steers and front end loaders vary from tractor to tractor, some very small others very-very large.
Balance is a huge issue. Don't tip your tractor!
Be sure that the machine you intend to use is suitable for the weight you intend to lift.
Lift height also varies. Watch your overhead clearance.

Daryl
MN
 

tmarks11

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#25
Or rent a drop deck trailer (sunbelt rental $75) and have them load it at the freight terminal. You can take the lathe off the trailer with a pallet jack.
 

scsmith42

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#26
I am fortunate in that I own my own trucks, trailers, and heavy equipment for load handling, so handling something like this is not an issue for me.

If I were in your shoes, I would arrange for the lathe to be shipped to your local freight terminal and pick it up there. Inspect the crate closely for damage before signing the acceptance form, and note any damage observed on the crate on the forms. I would use a truck and a small trailer (the smaller the better so that you can have positive tongue weight yet still fit the lathe under an engine hoist).

Most trailers will handle a 1,500 lb load, so your issue will be in manipulating the load once you have it home. As others have mentioned the lathe is top heavy; when I brought my recent 12 x 36" lathe home I used a pair of 3" nylon web straps to pick it up by the bed (picked up by hooking the straps to some skid steer forks). Handling the lathe suspended from the straps is safer than trying to pick it up from the bottom (won't tip over on the straps).

An engine hoist is an option (and you can rent them), but they can be a bit "tippy" too and the small wheels don't roll well across a rough surface. It's better to back the trailer with the lathe into your shop, open up the carton, and use the engine hoist to lift it straight up. Then pull the trailer out and lower the lathe until it is almost touching the floor before you attempt to roll it around on the hoist.

Chssesking's post with pix shows an excellent way for an individual to handle this.
 
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#27
Where there's a will there's a way. A few years ago I bought a 17 x 80 Summit. Had it shipped up from the Oklahoma city, interesting side note, they would not release it from the warehouse unless it was a flat deck trailer where it could be chained down. Had no way to unload it at home so drove to the trucking company's yard and hauled it home myself. Could have got a large loader that would pick it up but it was 12 feet long and my shop door is 10. On the way home it hit me, excavate the driveway to make a loading dock. So I dug out the drive where the trailer axles would be and backed into the hole. Jacked the pallet the lathe was on up and put rollers under it. Three of us moved 6500 pounds around on the 5 inch rollers and got it positioned.
IMG_1838.jpg

Since then I've installed a car hoist. A beam across the arms has unloaded quite a few heavy objects.

IMG_1053.jpg

Sometimes you just have to think outside the box.

Greg
 
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#28
When I brought my lathe home, it was strapped to a pallet with steel banding. Borrowed a Bobcat skidsteer loader with pallet forks and a trailer from a good friend. When I got to where I was picking up the lathe, I unloaded the Bobcat, picked up the lathe with the forks, then drove the Bobcat back up onto the trailer. Chained down the Bobcat and the lathe separately. When I got home I simple reversed the process.

My mill and power hacksaw were both a different story, however. They each came from farther away, and were loaded into the back of my pickup with a forklift in both cases. Both were on pallets, so I could have gone and got the Bobcat again, but I hate to wear out my welcome. Instead, I disassembled both machines and took them off of the truck in pieces that were manageable all by myself. Having those machines partially disassembled made it much easier to clean them up, as they both needed it!
 

Holescreek

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#29
This is my regular machinery hauler, it's only 4' wide between the wheel wells and 14' long. Rated for 11k pounds. IIRC it's 14" from the ground to the top of the deck. Too bad it's not a tilt bed. Sides are too tall for an engine hoist, would be perfect for a gantry. I used a tow truck with a boom and some nylon straps to get the mill off and into the shop.

BPlow1.jpg

BPlow3.jpg
 

CluelessNewB

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#30
My Logan 820 on my not so great trailer. I actually had a few more straps on it that had already been removed. I unloaded it with the bucket on my Kubota.

DSC_4184.JPG DSC_4183.JPG
 
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