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How Did You Handle Getting Your Lathe Home?

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Z2V

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She did well, definitely a keeper! Your a lucky man!
Looks like a well planned move,
 

ukkarl

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Had my lathe delivered to my shop doorway a few weeks ago, I have a fork lift so unloading off the truck was easy. Dropped both the pallets it was shipped on down onto my welding table which has a 1" plate top and is on heavy duty solid castors

Stripped it down, cleaned it up, oiled it, contacted Grizzly for the missing tools and damaged control panel plate, then I strapped it up and used my trusty Harbor Freight cherry picker to take it into my shops 'clean room' and lift it onto the bench.

Dear old wifey steered while I pushed/pulled, then she delicately lowered it onto straight onto the mounting bolts. Pretty good control of the lowering valve on the cherry picker too, a slow decent that was barely perceivable

Now to level it and start making chips!
 

RandyM

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I know not everyone has an automotive lift and dump trailer, but this is how I got my Logan home and on the floor.

Logan Lathe - Delivery - 2.JPG


Logan Lathe - Delivery - 3.JPG

I then just rolled it into place and used an engine crane to lift each end separately to get off the dollies.
 

hman

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Randy, you definitely used the appropriate tools. If my lathe had been any bigger, I seriously doubt the pickumup and the 1-ton engine hoist I had would have done the job.
 

RandyM

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Randy, you definitely used the appropriate tools. If my lathe had been any bigger, I seriously doubt the pickumup and the 1-ton engine hoist I had would have done the job.
Ah but, John, you had help. :grin: Yeah, I sometimes take my equipment to the limit as well. In this case I was well with in the safety limits. It is good see you got it all home safe and sound.
 

mcdanlj

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I used a lift-bed trailer to bring my G0907 home, with the aid of two good friends. I cut rigid metallic conduit into 2.5' and 5' sections and used them as rollers to move the lathe into position. I designed a 4' wide cradle dolly out of 2x6s, lag screwed together with 8" lag screws, in CAD, and then built it partly at home before I left but mostly on site around the lathe. I built up the headstock end first and left the tailstock end open to slide the dolly into place. I used 4 foot sections of 1" hot-roll for lift bars, and an engine hoist and a sling around the lift bars to lift it just high enough to get onto the cradle and bolt down. After the headstock end was bolted down, it was stable and I could lift the tailstock end without worrying as much about tipping. I moved the tailstock supports underneath, screwed them together with lag screws, and set the dolly down on 5' rollers. With a 51" base (48" inside longitudinal beams) it exhibited no tendency to tip over.

I loaded the lathe headstock-forward to get the right balance in the trailer.

I winched the cradle dolly on the pipe onto the trailer, running it on the rollers and leaving the rollers in place for transport. The trailer had a 2" receiver at the head that I used to mount a strap winch to pull it onto the deck; if I had it to do over again I would use a cable winch instead. I used four high-capacity ratchet straps to tie down the lathe; I used the lift bars fore and aft and tied each bar forward and backward. (Here some 2x4s alongside it obscure the dolly, sorry.)

on-trailer.JPG


When I removed the lathe from the trailer, I rolled it most of the way off, then lifted the headstock end with the trailer and screwed cheap wheels to the frame near the center of gravity, about 2' from the headstock end. (If I were doing it over, I would use 5/8" rod rather than 5/8" lag screws; one of the lag screws bent while I pulled it.) Then I set it on the ground, used lag screws to fasten a 2x4 tongue to my cradle dolly (now itself a trailer!) and pulled it with my lawn tractor into my shop.

on-dolly.JPG

The 2x4s sticking out the back were levers to help it up a slight ramp over the doorway into the shop.

In my shop, I used the engine hoist to put utility dollies under each corner and lock them in place with screws, then removed the wheels (not a trailer any more!) so they didn't interfere. I rolled the lathe into place and removed the cradle sides. Then starting at the tailstock end, I lifted it off the cradle ends, removed the cradle ends, installed leveling feet, and lowered it in place; then did the same under the headstock. Removing the chip catcher temporarily made it easier to use the engine hoist to lift the tailstock. Adjusted the feet to make it reasonably level to start with.


in-place.JPG

(Yes, there will be fire-resistant material in front of it for hot chips when it's running.) The feet are 4"x1" bars drilled and tapped for leveling screws, which are sitting on .325" x 6" load spreader bars on the shop floor, which wasn't originally intended to hole a machine this big. It's carefully placed for appropriate support though.

The 4' A36 hot-roll 1" round lift bar in the headstock end bent. That was impressive!
 

Superburban

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I use two 10K winches, one to drag the machine off the trailer, and down the ramps, and the other to keep it from going down too fast. So far has worked great for everything I moved. For the Southbend 16", I braced the legs with two 4x4's cut to fit tight between the legs and the base, so there would not be flex. I tried using the engine hoist, with the wells index, but did not do well with the chain, and when it was in the air, waiting on the trailer to be pulled forward, the chains decided to slide around, and gave both of us a good scare, and tested the engine hoist. 2nd pic.

20140813154138.jpg

0312141645-00.jpg

0529151056-00(1).jpg
 

Bob Korves

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Yikes on the scare...
 

Janderso

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Any damage?
All OK?
Whew, that doesn't look good.
 

Superburban

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No, no damage done(except for the heart beats skipped for me and my Son). I had it chained, so the hoist could lift from just above the table, with crossed chains going through a big shackle. After it was in the air for a minute or so, the chain s slid through the shackle, allowing it to lay down on its back. It was a dumb purchase. It is a tracer mill, where there is a pin that should follow a pattern, that controls a hydraulic valve, that moves the X and Y axis (hence the two hydraulic cylinders in place of the lead screws). Before I knew much about mills, I thought I could just change the controls to hydraulic levers, and mill that way, not realizing how you need to be able to control (and know) the amount of travel. Was not much longer that I got the deal on the Van Norman 22LU, and have never done anything with the Wells Index since.
 

Winegrower

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Ok, here’s a scare story for you...when I bought my Bridgeport (clone) the seller said he’d deliver it to my hangar. He did, brought it on a low trailer. He had a chain hoist, and we lifted it from the main I-beam, which was plenty sturdy. He then pulled the trailer out, and the mill was suspended about 18” above the concrete floor. He went over to the chain hoist, looked at it a bit, and said “ I think you just throw this lever here”. POW, the mill dropped straight down, smashed onto the floor. Incredibly, it stayed upright, and missed him by a couple inches! We were both stunned and lucky we weren’t killed or even worse. I thought it was ruined, but believe it or not, there was zero damage. It’s been a great asset for 12 years now.

So please be careful, guys and gals. This is serious stuff we’re doing.
 

Z2V

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Very lucky nobody was hurt, for sure. It sounds like the guy didn’t know how to use the tools he had, but it should not have dropped the load just by “throwing a lever”. The guy didn’t know how to use the broken tools he had.
 

mcdanlj

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The 4' A36 hot-roll 1" round lift bar in the headstock end bent. That was impressive!
Also, one of the 5/8" lag screws I was using as axles for the wheels bent too. I forgot that I took pictures to memorialize these:

it-bends.JPG
bent-bolt.JPG

I preached a sermon before we started something about not being a hero, don't try to catch falling machinery, move slowly, and it's OK to call stop if you aren't sure and want to think things through more.
 

Bob Korves

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Here is how I moved my mill and my lathe:
https://www.collegeoaktow.us/
The owner is a friend and former customer of mine, back when I was selling International (now Navistar) truck parts. He has over 80 tow trucks now (I think, all are International), and multiple yard locations in Sacramento county. I sold a bunch of machinist machines and tooling of all kinds for him that he had accumulated over the decades, also bought some for myself, including my mill.
I think towing companies are a good choice for moving equipment. Less expensive, and they get it done. Ask for an wrecker operator with plenty of experience moving machines.
 

middle.road

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We got real lucky with the Birmingham, except for the part about my 2500 blowing her engine after we first loaded up the lathe and were on the ramp onto the freeway.
The lathe fit nicely in the bucket, the hydraulics held luckily. The LS170 supposedly had a capacity of 1700 LBS when new, and I shave off 20% for age and figured the lathe @ 1000LBS
Door to door second time around. Kept the ramps level when loading and unloading and then @home drove it into the garage door and placed it on pipes and rolled it into position.

1542909923018.png
 

Be_Zero_Be

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I brought mine home on a flatbed trailer.
We used two engine hoists to raise it off the trailer bed and pulled the trailer out from under the lathe.
We lowered it down onto blocks and then moved it in with a pallet jack.

Lathe on the Trailer-1.jpg
On the trailer.

Hoist-1.jpg
The hoist on the headstock is a heavy duty U.S. made engine hoist.
The tailstock hoist is a China special.



_MY-PBR-1.JPG

Refurbished and installed

Hoist-1.jpg

_My Lathe.JPG

_MY-PBR-1.JPG
 

Downwindtracker2

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I'm a retired millwright, so rigging was one of the things we did. Never Never get anywhere it can land on you. Use a chain come-a-long to balance and level the load. Nylon straps are getting common, get a bunch, but buy them in pairs, every brand has a different idea of length. To take up difference in length, use wood blocks. In fact use wood blocks as softeners and spacers to protect dials, handles, etc.. If you are using a fork-lift ,tie to the mast , there is always a bump somewhere. Ratchet straps come in handy, but get the 1500# ones.
 

Be_Zero_Be

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Downwind track,

All good advice.

My installation was supervised by a good friend that is a Certified Rigger.
All lifting apparatus was certified for condition and capacity.
The two engine hoists only did a vertical lift - no horizontal movement.

I am an avid fan of safety and doing it right.
 

Downwindtracker2

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On engine hoists. Mine is one of those folding leg ones. The bolts that hold it together are Chinese metric 3.8 grade. In SAE, that's grade 3, pretty soft. One of the problem in using nylon slings is that the loops thick enough that they build up on the hook. Then they can slide off. It's good practice to use a shackle to tie them together. Ideally , put the shackle on the hook. Being a hobbyist, my machine tools are light bench tops, just a 1000# or so.
 
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