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[How do I?] How should I make this?

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Barncat

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#1
I want to make a new top for my wife's tea kettle, to replace the plastic one that keeps melting. The plastic one has little tabs to keep it secured on the kettle. How do I make a top out of stainless with spring loaded little tabs? Or do I even need the tabs, with the weight of the stainless compared to the existing plastic? IMG_20181128_163756024.jpg IMG_20181128_163822458.jpg
 

Alexander McGilton

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#2
Simple option, make an o-ring groove with high temperature O-ring. The friction of the seal will be your detent.
 

Winegrower

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#3
I find the somewhat sad part about our hobby is that you can buy a new teakettle for a lot less money and trouble. The happy part is that to make this cap, you'll justify some new tools.
 

David S

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#4
Is the part on the right some sort of hand hold? If so a metallic one may get too hot to hold, especially if the plastic one is melting.

David
 

Shootymacshootface

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#5
Hmm, wood might be a better medium. And you still get to use your machines!
 

Barncat

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#6
It is a handle on the side. I was thinking of having a small diameter ss rod coming out of the top, with a hardwood sleeve over it. Something similar to this. images.jpeg
 

Barncat

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#7
I find the somewhat sad part about our hobby is that you can buy a new teakettle for a lot less money and trouble. The happy part is that to make this cap, you'll justify some new tools.
I agree, I am sure a chunk of stainless will cost more than the kettle.
 

Uglydog

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#8
Throw away the original concept.
Think about your actual objectives, design a part to meet those objectives within your skill set and machine tolerance.
All is doable. You just gotta rethink the opportunity.
We often become hampered by believing that OEM is necessarily better.
OEM may have been the cheapest alternative....

Daryl
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Barncat

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#9
I was considering that. My thought was if it didn't need the little tabs, to make the part with a slight taper, so the top was bigger one than the the bottom. It would go down into the neck a little bit, but mostly sit on top of the kettle. I think the plastic original only had the tabs since it was so light, boiling water would have bounced it off. Maybe the heft of a metal part would keep it nestled on enough to not need to clip on.
 

Uglydog

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#10
Good.
Keep workin it!!
What else?

Daryl
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Hawkeye

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#11
Another consideration is whether the angle when pouring the last of the water out will cause the lid to fall off. I like Alexander's suggestion of using an O-ring as a detent. It might not have to be very tight to work.
 

dave_r_1

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#12
I would suggest keeping some kind of positive retaining mechanism for the lid, so when the pot tips over, the lid doesn't just fall off and the hot contents get to run out with little resistance.
 

Barncat

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#13
Another consideration is whether the angle when pouring the last of the water out will cause the lid to fall off. I like Alexander's suggestion of using an O-ring as a detent. It might not have to be very tight to work.
In its current form, the lid is meant to be removed for pouring, so that isn't much of a concern.
 

Barncat

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#14
Thanks for the help and ideas everyone!
 

WesPete66

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#15
If you must remove the lid to pour, is this pot somehow vented? If not there may be a vacuum formed under a tight fitting lid that will prevent it from being removed. We have pans that will do that.
 

WarrenP

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#16
If you must remove the lid to pour, is this pot somehow vented? If not there may be a vacuum formed under a tight fitting lid that will prevent it from being removed. We have pans that will do that.
Isn't that what the hole in the top is for? That and maybe to whistle when the water is hot.
 

RJSakowski

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#17
I too am faced with this dilema. My wife broke the top on her favorite Denby teapot. The last time we were in the UK, we stopped in the factory to get a new top. Unfortunately, the pot was out of production and none of the replacements came close.

I was able to glue the pieces together with super glue so I could make a SolidWorks model and it would be an interesting exercise for the Tormach CNC. The thought was to make it from Ultem, a high temperature plastic often used for kitchen utensils. However, the 4" diameter x 2.5" long piece of Ultem would cost over $20/inch. Somehow, paying over $50 plus shipping seems a stronger deterrent than the idea of discarding an otherwise good teapot.

I am still waiting to find a super deal on the raw material. It's only been eight years.
 

Barncat

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#18

RJSakowski

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#19
That's patience right there.
I guess that I could always take up pottery.

One positive about making a replacement cover is that it reenforces the need for all the machines in a way that's near and dear to the heart of the missus. The very first thing that I machined on the Tormach was an aluminum latch to replace the broken plastic latch on the wife's Cusuinart tea kettle.
 

samstu

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#20
Instead of tabs, some captive ball bearings with tension springs could be used. Maybe make them out of nylon so they wont score the teapot if it's made of glass.

The solution might be simpler: water boils at 212, so maybe it's not steam melting the lid but the burner turned up too high, especially if gas. Your stove may have adjustments so you can turn down the maximum flame. Just don't tell the boss lady. Or maybe that chinesium tea pot is poorly engineered.
 

derf

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#21
Just put a radiator cap on it....:grin:
 
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