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Huanyang 3kw Vfd-240 Volt Single Phase To 220 Volt 3 Phase

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johnnyc14

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#1
I installed a Hyanyang VFD on my newly acquired Bridgeport clone mill and I am happy with the results. I have is set up with a remote panel with switches for run, forward/reverse and jog as well as a variable speed potentiometer. I removed the old electrical box from the side of the mill and gutted all the old electrical stuff out of it. I mounted the box on an adjustable pedestal with the vfd and switch panel inside so it can be reached easily. After I got all the settings right I wrote a up a document and drew a schematic in case anyone else wants this information. The switch panel in the picture is temporary. I plan to make something prettier later, I just wanted to get it up and running fast for now.

P2210791_zpsllxnbgpr.jpg

P2210790_zps2mgdnjri.jpg


Huanyang Inverter (VFD)


-Model number HY03D023B

-Input 240 Volt single phase

-Rated output 220 Volt 3 phase 4 HP or 3KW 13 Amps (220 volts X 13 Amps = 2860 watts) (1 HP = 746 Watts) (4 X 746 Watts = 2984 Watts)


Initial Set-Up


-Instructions from vendor (eBay seller “Solar Jean”) suggested the frequency parameters be set in the following order: PD05 set to 60HZ, PD04 set to 60HZ, PD03 set to 60HZ, PD72 to 60HZ. I connected the 200 Volt single phase input power to terminals S and T and the 3 legs of the 3 phase 3 HP motor to terminals U, V, and W. I plugged the VFD in with it temporarily just lying of the table of the mill and it powered up. I set the above parameters as suggested and the Run, Forward and Reverse functions worked from the unit’s built in keypad.


Advanced Set-Up


-I wanted to use a remote mounted control panel to allow remote function of Run, Forward/Reverse, Jog as well as a Potentiometer controlled variable speed. Since the mill has a variable speed head I see no reason to run the motor at more than the rated 60HZ. Using the supplied manual I then made the following switching, wiring and parameter changes to achieve the functions I wanted. I used the schematic on page 37 as a guide for the 3 wire Run, Forward/Reverse switches and the schematic on page 12 for the wiring of the Potentiometer. Page 36 explains how the output terminals can be re-configured for multiple uses. I drew the following schematic after researching the manual. The information on pages 19-26 of the manual details which parameters and settings support the different functions. Since my custom settings are all basic they are all covered on pages 19-20 except PD72 which was part of the initial setup for 60HZ power. These are the connections and parameter changes I made to make the VFD function as I wanted:


See the schematic on the next page, Switch 1 is for D1, Switch 2 is for D2 and Switch 3 is for D3.

-PD01 set to 1 to support use of external input controls.

-PD44 set to 1 to change the function of the “FOR” terminal to D1. When set to 1, D1 is now the Run function.

-PD45 set to 5 to change the function of the “REV” terminal to D2. When set to 5, D2 is now the Forward/Reverse selector. When Switch 2 is open you get forward rotation and when closed you get reverse. See page 37 of the manual for these instructions.

-PD46 set to 6 to change the function of the “RST” terminal to D3. When set to 6, D3 is now the Jog function. It works in forward or reverse depending on the position of switch 2.

-PD02 set to 1 to support the input from the external Potentiometer for speed control.

-PD11 set to 10. This sets the lowest frequency of the variable speed to 10HZ so the potentiometer can adjust the speed of the motor from 10HZ to 60HZ. The factory setting is 0 so when the pot is turned all the way down the motor stops.

-PD14 set to 5 to change the acceleration time (0Hz to 60HZ) to 5 seconds when run is selected. Factory setting is 20 seconds.

-PD15 set to 5 to change ramp down or deceleration time (60HZ to 0HZ) to 5 seconds. I was cautioned to go no lower than 5 seconds without connecting an external braking resistor. The VFD must be given time to dissipate the energy created by the motor as it slows (it acts as a generator when slowing). The internal braking circuits in the VFD cannot support aggressive deceleration and an external braking resistor must be added to slow to a stop quickly. Using the information in the manual, and some internet searches I settled on a 200 ohm, 200 watt resistor. I have ordered but not received it yet so the one show in the schematic is not wired in currently. I will update this information when I get the resistor and experiment with aggressive slow down times.


VFD%20Schematic_zps8fn7xg1w.png


John
 

Ulma Doctor

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#3
Nice Work jonnyc14,
i have the same inverter- but i'm putting it on a lathe also with a 3hp motor.
 

johnnyc14

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#4
Ironmonger, I like your idea. I looked on eBay and you can buy FC-10P cables very cheap. Is this the cable end you used. The number FC10P is embossed on the cable end on my vfd's board. They have used clear silicone sealant to attach the cable end to the board so I'm not sure I can get it off without damage.

FC10P%20cable_zps1vmhos1v.jpg
 

johnnyc14

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#5
Nice Work jonnyc14,
i have the same inverter- but i'm putting it on a lathe also with a 3hp motor.
Thanks Mike, it took me a couple of days of research to figure all the settings as this is my first experience with a vfd. If you need any input let me know. It is all still pretty fresh in my head so I might be able to help.

John
 

ironmonger

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#7
Hi John
I bought the bare connectors and crimped 'em on my own ribbon cable. I was able to carefully cut off the sealant. Mine looked like a hot melt, who knows. I did not apply anything to replace it. Have not had a problem as yet. I did not experiment with cable length, mine is about 8" long... I don't think that a length of 16" or 18" would be a problem, given how long HDD and Floppy cables are.

As I mentioned before, the shop is to cold to heat for playin' around just yet, so my setting issues for the Hyanyang will wait. Everything operates, it's just that the controls are not doing just what I want. I should prolly finish painting it and such before undertaking a DRO project, but that just doesn’t seem to be how I roll :>) Spring is coming...

paul
 

aeroHAWK

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#8
I will update this information when I get the resistor and experiment with aggressive slow down times.
John,

Any updates about Braking Resistors? I ask because I have found posts in other forums saying that a lot of Huanyang VFDs don't have all the braking circuitry populated on to the PC Board....
 

Earl

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#9
I have two of the same units, one on a SB heavy 10 and the other on a grizzly g4003g. Neither unit supports the braking resistor. I bought them about 2 years apart. Not only are the IBGT and optoisolator missing, there is nowhere on the circuit board to put them. I researched and found a partial schematic of the power driver board. It showed the missing parts. I purchased the components but when i took the unit apart, there was no place to mount them! The thing that will confirm that the braking circuit is incomplete is that one of the resistor terminals ( P orR) connects to the circuit board but that trace terminates in a hole that is connected to nothing. It has been 6 or 7 months since I went thru the exercise. I decided that I would build a circuit board to hold the components but have not done it yet. I have played with the DC braking parameters on the unit connected to the Grizzly and it stops from 1000 rpm in about 4 seconds. There is a trade off between stopping fast and getting an error. Just when you have it stopping quickly without setting an error, you put a little more mass in the chuck (bigger rifle barrel) and you get an errot every time you stop! So if you play with the dc brake paramaters, do it with the largest load that you will normally use.
 

aeroHAWK

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#10
Earl,

Good luck with your custom PC board! I am interested to see how it works for you.

I have a 1.5 kw (2 HP) unit and it has the "hole connected to nothing" as you point out. I am using mine on a Bridgeport Series I clone. I have experimented with deceleration time and can stop from 3500 RPM in less than 6 seconds. Since an external breaking resistor is not an option on mine, I have opted for the "coast to a stop" option and use the hand operated spindle brake that I've used for years.
 

Earl

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#11
I would think that DC braking parameters on a mill would not be as critical to set up as they are on a lathe. The mass of the load should be pretty constant - just a few different bits - end mill, face mill, fly cutter. But I do understand the theory of "it works for me so I'm leaving it alone!" I am an electrical engineer for the last 49 years. I was doing analog and logic design back before the microprocessor era. I would not need any luck to complete the circuit board - just motivation! :) Once I understood how the braking parameters changed in relation to the load, I was satisfied that I had it set up as best I could do. Although I have the components here in a drawer, I realize that there is no room inside the unit to add another circuit board with a heat sink on it. An external setup would look pretty bad so the cost/benefit was not overwhelming. An alternative braking setup would be to use the "coast to stop" setting along with a relay to put the resistor across two of the 3 phases to the motor. I would bet that it would stop the motor in about 2 or 3 revolutions. While pursuing that idea, I though about the screw on chuck on my southbend. Stopping that quickly with a screw on chuck could be a real adventure.
An engineer buddy of mine that is a woodworker uses dynamic braking on all of his "spinning" stuff - Saw, sander, planer, etc. His saw stops in about a quarter second. The motor really groans when he shuts it off. He uses water heater elements as resistors. He gets them at the dump! My little 300 watt resistor pales in comparison to his multiple kilowatt ones! :) He also gets his heavy duty braking relays at the dump from old AC units. He proudly claims that the "life cycle cost" of his braking system is "0". Although it seems like a bit of overkill to stop so quickly, his claim is that most bad things happen when the blades are spinning down. I have tossed a few pieces of wood with my table saw when I got too anxious and tried to move the piece before the blade had stopped.

My mill is a Grizzly G0695. It has a built in VFD. The rpm is limited to 2250. I have some small end mills that I would like to run faster than that. I have the vfd manual but have not changed anything as yet. One of these days I will make the changes to the unit and probably destroy the bearings in the motor :)
 

aeroHAWK

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#12
Earl,

I agree that the mill has less variation in the mass of the spindle/tooling combination. The biggest influence I found was the high RPM. When operating at 2000 RPM, I could get the decel time below 3 seconds. But at 3500 RPM it was about 6 seconds. And as you suggest, it needs to be set for the worst case scenario.

My current setup with "Coast to Stop" works fine, since it is exactly as it worked before the VFD (except smoother and quieter).

Your mill is a nice mill, I had considered getting one. I wouldn't be too concerned about the bearings when turning it faster - especially if it is in a "hobby" environment.;)
 

johnnyc14

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#13
Interesting discussion. I installed my braking resistor and set the decel time to 3 seconds. It seems to be working fine but I have not run the mill over 1800 rpm yet. I will give it a try at high speed and see what happens. Thanks guys.
 

Uguessedit

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#14
I installed a Hyanyang VFD on my newly acquired Bridgeport clone mill and I am happy with the results. I have is set up with a remote panel with switches for run, forward/reverse and jog as well as a variable speed potentiometer. I removed the old electrical box from the side of the mill and gutted all the old electrical stuff out of it. I mounted the box on an adjustable pedestal with the vfd and switch panel inside so it can be reached easily. After I got all the settings right I wrote a up a document and drew a schematic in case anyone else wants this information. The switch panel in the picture is temporary. I plan to make something prettier later, I just wanted to get it up and running fast for now.

View attachment 182839

View attachment 182840


Huanyang Inverter (VFD)


-Model number HY03D023B

-Input 240 Volt single phase

-Rated output 220 Volt 3 phase 4 HP or 3KW 13 Amps (220 volts X 13 Amps = 2860 watts) (1 HP = 746 Watts) (4 X 746 Watts = 2984 Watts)


Initial Set-Up


-Instructions from vendor (eBay seller “Solar Jean”) suggested the frequency parameters be set in the following order: PD05 set to 60HZ, PD04 set to 60HZ, PD03 set to 60HZ, PD72 to 60HZ. I connected the 200 Volt single phase input power to terminals S and T and the 3 legs of the 3 phase 3 HP motor to terminals U, V, and W. I plugged the VFD in with it temporarily just lying of the table of the mill and it powered up. I set the above parameters as suggested and the Run, Forward and Reverse functions worked from the unit’s built in keypad.


Advanced Set-Up


-I wanted to use a remote mounted control panel to allow remote function of Run, Forward/Reverse, Jog as well as a Potentiometer controlled variable speed. Since the mill has a variable speed head I see no reason to run the motor at more than the rated 60HZ. Using the supplied manual I then made the following switching, wiring and parameter changes to achieve the functions I wanted. I used the schematic on page 37 as a guide for the 3 wire Run, Forward/Reverse switches and the schematic on page 12 for the wiring of the Potentiometer. Page 36 explains how the output terminals can be re-configured for multiple uses. I drew the following schematic after researching the manual. The information on pages 19-26 of the manual details which parameters and settings support the different functions. Since my custom settings are all basic they are all covered on pages 19-20 except PD72 which was part of the initial setup for 60HZ power. These are the connections and parameter changes I made to make the VFD function as I wanted:


See the schematic on the next page, Switch 1 is for D1, Switch 2 is for D2 and Switch 3 is for D3.

-PD01 set to 1 to support use of external input controls.

-PD44 set to 1 to change the function of the “FOR” terminal to D1. When set to 1, D1 is now the Run function.

-PD45 set to 5 to change the function of the “REV” terminal to D2. When set to 5, D2 is now the Forward/Reverse selector. When Switch 2 is open you get forward rotation and when closed you get reverse. See page 37 of the manual for these instructions.

-PD46 set to 6 to change the function of the “RST” terminal to D3. When set to 6, D3 is now the Jog function. It works in forward or reverse depending on the position of switch 2.

-PD02 set to 1 to support the input from the external Potentiometer for speed control.

-PD11 set to 10. This sets the lowest frequency of the variable speed to 10HZ so the potentiometer can adjust the speed of the motor from 10HZ to 60HZ. The factory setting is 0 so when the pot is turned all the way down the motor stops.

-PD14 set to 5 to change the acceleration time (0Hz to 60HZ) to 5 seconds when run is selected. Factory setting is 20 seconds.

-PD15 set to 5 to change ramp down or deceleration time (60HZ to 0HZ) to 5 seconds. I was cautioned to go no lower than 5 seconds without connecting an external braking resistor. The VFD must be given time to dissipate the energy created by the motor as it slows (it acts as a generator when slowing). The internal braking circuits in the VFD cannot support aggressive deceleration and an external braking resistor must be added to slow to a stop quickly. Using the information in the manual, and some internet searches I settled on a 200 ohm, 200 watt resistor. I have ordered but not received it yet so the one show in the schematic is not wired in currently. I will update this information when I get the resistor and experiment with aggressive slow down times.


View attachment 182841


John
I have the same part number but my model looks different and the parameters programmed do not us PD they are PN and numbered 1-35 only. I have only 1 row of terminals to connect as well. Oddly I can’t find anything about it online I bought them all a year ago and that’s all that was online and now all I see are these models. About all I could do is get it running and none of the remote parameters work. If you or anyone had any information to this oddity please let me know. Attached is a photo of it.
 

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johnnyc14

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#15
That's odd since its the same part number. Maybe they are cutting their costs and building the vfd with only basic features now. I read that the earlier one like mine were a knock off copy of a fairly high spec Japanese made vfd. It look like the keypad has no PGM button so maybe it was designed with only basic pre programmed functions?

I eventually got the cable to allow me to relocate my display panel and mounted it along with the 3 switches and the potentiometer for speed control onto the front panel of my electrical box. I have set the minimum frequency to 15 Hz and max to 60 Hz. Since the mill has a variable speed head i see no reason to run the motor at a higher frequency but it is nice to be able to run it slower when needed. I mounted the braking resistor and tried aggressive slow down times but wound up with error codes. My unit is like Earls and the circuit board is not completely set up for a braking resistor so that was wasted money and time. Its not really a problem on a mill but it would be on a lathe and I would go with a different brand vfd if I was converting my lathe to 3 phase.








John
 

Eddyde

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#16
I have the same part number but my model looks different and the parameters programmed do not us PD they are PN and numbered 1-35 only. I have only 1 row of terminals to connect as well. Oddly I can’t find anything about it online I bought them all a year ago and that’s all that was online and now all I see are these models. About all I could do is get it running and none of the remote parameters work. If you or anyone had any information to this oddity please let me know. Attached is a photo of it.
Unfortunately you may have a bootleg version, yes the Chinese are now even counterfeiting their own products, Caveat emptor.
 

markba633csi

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#17
Johnny: You might want to check the temperature of the VFD after a period of running- maybe need to add some
cooling holes
Nice install tho
Mark
 
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