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Husky A1S - 8x30... Just purchased my first mill.

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MikeInOr

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#1
Hello.... New here. Like many others on here I have wanted a mill for hobby use for the greater portion of my life. After many (20+) years of keeping an eye out the stars finally aligned and I found a mill that will fit in my shop, I believe will be big enough for most of what I want to do, and I had enough money in the bank to cover the price. I just got home from purchasing a Husky A1S 8x30 mill for $1000 and another $200 for a Kurt vise... I am pretty excited. The seller is going to bring it over tomorrow evening and help me unload it. After watching a million youtubes I think it is in good enough shape to suite my purposes. The spindle was quiet on high speed. There were scrape marks on the ways. The table appeared pretty tight. I could not detect any runout on the spindle with my dial indicator. I know the Husky is a generic Taiwanese mill and the big brother to many generic 6x24 mills. I have been close to purchasing mill drills many times... I think this 8x30 will be a bit more capabable for what I want to do. I hope I did ok!

Like everyone else I want to learn about machining (I have had an Atlas 12x36 lathe for 30+ years now that I am somewhat proficient on). Make some odd parts and maybe do a little gunsmithing. I am an old machine junkie but mostly in the wood working world. I have dragged home old machines and restored them just because I have felt sorry for them. I have a bit of a weakness for old radial arm saws and a late 40's Redstar 16" 7.5hp turret arm RAS is the center of my woodworking shop.

I will post pictures when I get it unloaded tomorrow.
 
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Ulma Doctor

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#2
Welcome to the Forum!
i can't wait to see your new girlfriend!
congratulations!!! :grin:
 

richl

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#3
Welcome to the forum.
Ras are not my favorite machines, I've owned a few, worked on many. I guess it's because I'm getting older and know just one "senior moment" and you are missing a body part:cool:
Looking forward to seeing the mill though! Congrats!!
Rich
 

middle.road

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#4
Welcome to the forum.
Ras are not my favorite machines, I've owned a few, worked on many. I guess it's because I'm getting older and know just one "senior moment" and you are missing a body part:cool:
Looking forward to seeing the mill though! Congrats!!
Rich
Heck I've felt that way about RASs since I was in my twenties.
There are though, some magnificent designs in the old ones.

-=-
Welcome aboard Mike!
 

MikeInOr

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#5
Thank you for the welcomes!

My new mill comes with no tooling. The seller got a great deal on a Bridgeport so he is keeping all his tooling.

My new 8 x 30 has an R8 taper. I "Believe" I need a set of R8 collets. A couple end mills to practice with. Probably a R8 shank to mount a chuck. I have a pretty nice Jacobs chuck for my Atlas lathe. I think it sits on a #2 Morse Taper for my lathe. Should I get a #2 MT to R8 adapter? Or just pick up a R8 shank and a good used Jacobson to dedicate to the mill? Where should I get a set of collets from? I am a fan of Grizzley tools shaper cutters for woodworking... is there mill tooling acceptable? Should I look on ebay? Any other suggestions? Any other tooling I should pickup to start with? A set of parallels?

P.S. I spent a year watching a Walker Turner geared head RAS rotting under someones carport. I finally offered them $40 and it followed me home. Lots of work with a wire wheel and all new bearing... she turned out beautiful! I feel ashamed about running an abrasive blade on it to cut metal... but I already have 2 nice RAS's for wood. The WT has the nice cast iron base on it.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#6
Hi MikeInOr,
Yes a set of R8 collets is a good idea
Some r8 Weldon Tool Holders are very nice, but not completely necessary at first(unless you have the endmills with a flat machined in the tool)
Parallels is a must too, or at least some very accurately ground material ( HSS tool blanks can be substituted in a pinch)

Grizzly's tooling is import, some is good, others not so good- but they really don't sell junk.

I'd think about using 5/8" or 3/4"shanks on your different tooling, like drill chucks and fly cutters and use a collet in the spindle for quick change outs

you can buy quality used collets on Ebay
or
new sets are inexpensive from Shars (http://www.shars.com/products/toolh...?collet_category=Collet+Sets&collet_series=R8), or All Industrial Supply(http://allindustrial.com/all-indust...1-for-bridgeport-with-r8-collet-rack-12-slot/) or JTS Machinery (https://jtsmach.com/jtswebshop/Workholding/CH044.asp)

i hope the info is helpful

PS, i always wanted a WT drill press :grin:
 

MikeInOr

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#7
Ulma, thank you. Very helpful! I was just looking at a set of the Shars collets on ebay last night and realized I had no idea what to look for as far as quality tooling that I would not regret purchasing later. The recommendations are very helpful! Thanks for the tip on using a collet to hold a drill chuck for quick tool changing... something I hadn't thought of but it makes a lot of sense.

A couple pics from the CL add.
Mill1.jpg
mill2.jpg
mill3.jpg
 
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MikeInOr

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#8
What do you guys think of this chuck? $96 on ebay... $200+ new w/o arbor. The arbor on this chuck is 3/4". To me it looks dirty but in good shape... it looks like it hasn't had much use to my eyes.

Jacobs14n.jpg

Ball Bearing - Taper Mount
■ Ball Bearing Construction Maximizes Gripping Force and Drilling Accuracy
■ Jaws Center-Ground for Straightness and Alignment
■ One-Piece Sleeve Eliminates Crack Between Driving Teeth Often Found in Other Designs
■ Through-Hardened Sleeve Teeth Plus Hardened Nose and Keyholes Provide Outstanding Wear Resistance
■ Fluted Sleeve Standard
■ Each Chuck 100% Inspected for Performance and Precision
■ T.I.R. 0.003"

Model: 14N
Min Capacity: 0.040 in
Max Capacity: 0.500 in
Closed Length: 3.88 in
Open Length: 2.97 in
Sleeve dia: 2.97 in
Weight: 2.44 lb
 

Dave Paine

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#9
That looks very similar to my Grizzly G1008 mill which also has 8x30 table. I purchased this second hand end of Jan 2017 so almost 1 year ago. The seller purchased this new in 2000.

Mill_after_cleaning_way_covers_7545.jpg


Mine came with a set of R8 collets. I purchased a Jacobs chuck with R8 mount. I have purchased a number of items from Shars in the past year.

My Grizzly does not have a quill lock, so I need to hold the quill pulley to tighten or loosen the collet. Not a problem.

You will need a mill clamping kit. Available from many places, even Harbor Freight. Just measure your slots so you get a set with correct T nuts.
 

MikeInOr

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#10
Yes Dave, very similar mills. I couldn't find much info on Husky mills so I ended up doing a fair bit of reading on your Grizzly before making my decision. Most owners had pretty positive reviews on the Grizzly 8 x 30 mills. Are you pleased with yours? Did your mill come with the DRO and power feed? Both options I would like to add eventually. The one feature my mill doesn't have that really bothered me is the one shot lube. It seems like a mill would have probably received better lube over its life if it had a one shot lube.

Do most people prefer the Keyless chucks over keyed chucks? I see a lot of pictures of mills with keyless chucks. All my drill presses have always had keyed chucks.
 
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Silverbullet

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#11
Looks like my enco too. Sure made plenty with many dealers. I love the size for my shop and my being in a wheelchair it's perfect. I'm planning on making a riser tho , I'm thinking 4-5" , doubleboost on YouTube added 9" and his is rock solid and he really uses it ALOT. He just upgraded to vfd motor complete set up. And yes welcome to the site , there are no wrong questions on here. We help don't put off.. I have a favor could you give me a rough diameter on the swivel of the turret . I'm looking to buy metal for when I ever get out of pain to raise the head. YUPP be safe enjoy
 

Dave Paine

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#13
The Grizzly G1004 mill did not include the X axis power feed. The G1008 was the model with the X axis power feed. This model also included one-shot lubrication pump and coolant pump.

The previous owner installed the DRO, a CBX3 unit from Shooting Star, one of the lower priced units. Works well, just bare bones. It does not retain settings on power off, so always starts up with all axis at "0". Also no bolt circle calcs. I can enter a measurement or use "Centre" to get half the distance between edges, a feature I use often.

The one-shot lubrication pump had a cracked lens so the previous owner stopped using it. The remnant of the oil had solidified in the bottom. I was able to clean this out and happy to find it was able to pump with clean fresh oil.

I found one source of this size of pump in China, but decided to fix my unit. I replaced the lens with a piece of acrylic, reusing the O ring. The top was cracked on all 4 corners so I replaced with a thick piece of acrylic. I decided not to bother with fill hole. It will take me a long time before I need to refill and will just remove the screws.

I do wonder when the pump stopped operating for the previous owner and what, if anything he was using for lubrication. He was not good at keeping things clean. A number of marks on the ways of the knee from swarf getting under the table.

Finding a one-shot lubrication pump is easy. Installing the tubing will take some time. I was relieved my tubing was not blocked, so once I had clean fresh oil I was able to lubricate the ways.

Mill_manual_lube_pump_cleaned_fixed_7543.jpg


This style of machine does not have screws in the head for tramming, so nudge-and-fudge needed. Takes time, but only needed perhaps once. In my case needing due to transportation.

I have been happy with the mill. It has some constraints. I did not like the speeds, 450 rpm then 910 rpm, nothing in between.

I removed the auxiliary pulley and flipped the motor pulley upside down, so now I have only 3 speeds, but more useful for my needs, 560, 860 and 1200. I will eventually upgrade to 3 phase motor and VFD to get more speeds. I am using a link belt, just easier to be able to adjust the length as I needed. Runs quite and smooth.

I use the mill for metal and wood projects. For wood projects the 7 1/2in distance from quill centreline to base is a constraint. I wish I had more Y axis travel.

I would love a Bridgeport, but would not be able to get one into my shop easily due to height constraints.

I have a keyed Jacobs Super Chuck I use on the metal lathe, and a keyless chuck from Shars I use on the mill.
 

Silverbullet

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#14
What do you guys think of this chuck? $96 on ebay... $200+ new w/o arbor. The arbor on this chuck is 3/4". To me it looks dirty but in good shape... it looks like it hasn't had much use to my eyes.

View attachment 252805
Ball Bearing - Taper Mount
■ Ball Bearing Construction Maximizes Gripping Force and Drilling Accuracy
■ Jaws Center-Ground for Straightness and Alignment
■ One-Piece Sleeve Eliminates Crack Between Driving Teeth Often Found in Other Designs
■ Through-Hardened Sleeve Teeth Plus Hardened Nose and Keyholes Provide Outstanding Wear Resistance
■ Fluted Sleeve Standard
■ Each Chuck 100% Inspected for Performance and Precision
■ T.I.R. 0.003"

Model: 14N
Min Capacity: 0.040 in
Max Capacity: 0.500 in
Closed Length: 3.88 in
Open Length: 2.97 in
Sleeve dia: 2.97 in
Weight: 2.44 lb
Try looking on more eBay sellers that seems high to me , should run half or less of that price.
 

Mitch Alsup

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#15
I was just looking at a set of the Shars collets on ebay last night and realized I had no idea what to look for as far as quality tooling that I would not regret purchasing later. The recommendations are very helpful! Thanks for the tip on using a collet to hold a drill chuck for quick tool changing... something I hadn't thought of but it makes a lot of sense.
Looks a lot like my Grizzly G0730.

I use ER40 collets in an ER40-R8 chuck on mine.
Straight R8 collets will buy you another 2" of nose height--always welcome on the 6*26 not so necessary on the 8*30.
I have a R8-1/2" keyless drill chuck on mine, too. About $120 new.
 

Silverbullet

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#16
Ck this chuck out ,14N mt3 $40. $5.95 ship. 16282617628 type this number in search on eBay there's one to bid on for $9.95 #352245582333
 

MikeInOr

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#17
Thank you SilverBullet. The chuck I was looking at had a 3/4" straight arbor on it. I was looking at the price on some of the Jacobs arbors and thought $97 was a pretty good deal for the set. I have since found on the Shars website that I can pickup a 3/4" straight arbor with a 2JT taper for $5 - $10 making the original 14N chuck look not as appealing. I have bids on a Rohn and a Albretch chucks that end in a little over an hour. When I loose the bids on those I will probably put a bid in on the Jacobs chuck you linked to. Thank you for the heads up!

I have a nice old Jacob chuck for my lathe (Probably a 14N) that I really like. I have read a couple posts leading me to believe that the higher end keyless chucks maintain a better concentricity than keyed chucks???? I am torn between getting a keyless or keyed chuck. Knowing how much nicer the Jacobs for my lathe is than the Chinese chuck on my Chinese drill press is... it makes sense to me to buy a nice chuck for my Mill. I think I will get a fair amount of use from a chuck on my mill?

On the Shars website they have many different collet sets. Is there any real advantage to getting a larger set of collets with a 1/32" increment than a smaller set with a 1/16" increment? I figure a good chuck would be sufficient for all the off sized and metric drill bits? Shars has a set of R8 collets 1/8" - 3/4" by 1/16" increments plus a 1" collet for $58. This seems like it might a good fit for me. Is there much need for a 7/8" collet? I assume I will be using these collets mainly for holding end mills and most end mills have a standard shank size???

I am also looking at the Shars 3/16" to 3/4" tin coated end mill set to get me started... but I am open to recommendations?

I know everyones tooling needs will be different but it is helpful to know what others find they use a lot?

Are the ER40 collets just quicker to change than R8 collets since you can change them from the bottom of the quill without having to loosen the draw bar on the top of the quill?
 
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MikeInOr

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#18
Finding a one-shot lubrication pump is easy. Installing the tubing will take some time. I was relieved my tubing was not blocked, so once I had clean fresh oil I was able to lubricate the ways.

View attachment 252806
In researching the Husky 8 x 30 I came across a post about the one shot lube on his Grizzly. I recall him saying that he had to over lube his ways before any lube made it to the spindle... something you might want to keep an eye on.

I don't know if I am going to be up for a one-shot retrofit... seems like it would be a fair amount of work!

I do like link belts, I have them for several of my machines. I feel like my table saws run smoother with them... but that might just be my imagination. One of the belts on the Husky looks original and pretty tired. Both will probably be replaced with a link belt.

Most of my larger wood working machines are 3ph. I have a rotary converter I built 20+ years ago. I have been slowly swapping everything to VFD's... since they have gotten so inexpensive lately and are so much nicer to work with. A 3ph motor and VFD does sound like a really nice upgrade!
 

Dave Paine

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#19
The Grizzly one-shot lubrication is only for the ways on the knee. The quill has a separate manual lubrication point. Grizzly even provided the plastic oil can. I have this oil can.

The oiler is on the left of the quill handle in this picture. A Gits style oiler. Flip the top up then apply some oil.

This picture shows my link belt with the auxiliary pulley removed.

I have two magnetic hooks on the side of the casting to hold the wrench for the spindle (19mm) and clamping nuts (17mm).

Mill_head_scales_for_rotation_7948.jpg
 

MikeInOr

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#20
I must have remembered the model or even the manufacture incorrectly. The oiler not lubing the spindle just stuck out in my mind as something concerning.

She made it home in good shape!
DSC04986-1.jpg


I got 1 shot before the battery in my camera died. I will have to add more pictures later.
 

Z2V

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#21
Looks good Mike.
I have the Enco 8 x 30 version of yours. It’s a perfect fit for my garage shop.
A DRO would be a nice addition for your machine along with the VFD down the road.

I picked up this drill chuck, I really like it so far.
31AA58CD-CCD6-41D6-8DB3-C3AA5AF4D1DC.png
 

MikeInOr

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#22
I scored a Rohm 1/32 - 1/2" and a Rohm 0 - 3/8" keyless chucks on ebay yesterday at $58 for the pair. I will have to order a couple arbors for them but I think they will be a good start.
 

Dave Paine

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#23
The Rohm chucks should be a good start if they are in good condition.

I forgot to mention earlier, if you need to replace the belts and they were made by "First Rope" do not trust the code on the belt to be the same as a US brand belt. Measure the length.

My mill had the original belts and they were in dire need of replacement, the outer fabric had worn off or was coming off. They were made by First Rope. The code was B-35. I wanted to replace the solid belt with a cogged belt so I purchased a BX-35 belt. I foolishly did not measure. When the belt arrived it was too big.
 

MikeInOr

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#24
What size parallels?

I have a cart started on the Shars sight:
R8 collet set 1/8" to 3/4" + 1"
3/16" to 3/4" TIN end mill set
5/8" shank for 1/32 - 1/2" chuck
1/2" shank for 0 - 3/8" chuck
Edge Center finder set
Small fly cutter set

Parallels are more expensive than I had expected! I have no clue what size parallels set to get? 1/32" set and a 1/4" set? Or look for a adjustable set on ebay?

Machinists precision level??? I believe I will need one... but wow they are kind of pricey! I have MANY levels for woodworking and construction but have no clue about machinists levels? Can someone point me in the right direction on a precision level please?


I have many bits, HSS and Carbide for my lathe... I hope I have something that will work with the fly cutter set. I think I will be doing smaller work like gunsmithing... installing sites etc. So I figured I would be using smaller mills and smaller collets hence 1/2" and 5/8" arbors for the chucks I just picker up. Good idea?
 

Ulma Doctor

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#25
Nice score on the Rohm chucks.
they are high quality tooling- most German Manufactured tools are high quality.

there are 2 methods i use to determine belt sizes...
1) if you have the belt and the belt is broken or otherwise unsuitable for use, simply lay the belt out lengthwise if broken and take the measurement of the broken section. if the belt is in one piece cut the belt and lay it out flat and take the measurement

2) if you don't have the belt ...
take a piece of small rope or string and loop around the drive pulleys tautly, and mark the rope/string where the free end meets up .
then take the measurement. i usually add 1" to the string/rope measurement to avoid getting too short of a belt
 

Ulma Doctor

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#26
i have both the thick and thin parallels
the thick ones are nice when working on larger pieces in a vise, the thin parallels are sometimes useful, for smaller work so the jaws of the vise can close more.
both are valuable to have, although the thin ones are a little more versatile, but a bit more of a PITA to use sometimes
Precision machinist levels can be very expensive and can have resolutions of .0005" in a 12" span
i have a Blanchard Level that is .0003" in 12"
if you are vigilant, you can find old Starrett spirit levels for less than $125
an 8" or 12" level would be preferable, but 6" levels can be useful too
 

MikeInOr

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#27
i have both the thick and thin parallels
the thick ones are nice when working on larger pieces in a vise, the thin parallels are sometimes useful, for smaller work so the jaws of the vise can close more.
both are valuable to have, although the thin ones are a little more versatile, but a bit more of a PITA to use sometimes
Precision machinist levels can be very expensive and can have resolutions of .0005" in a 12" span
i have a Blanchard Level that is .0003" in 12"
if you are vigilant, you can find old Starrett spirit levels for less than $125
an 8" or 12" level would be preferable, but 6" levels can be useful too
Thank you! That is very helpful to get me going in the right direction! Having a ball park on price and size gives me a reference to start looking!

My understanding is most milling operations start with a well leveled mill then you level your work piece knowing this will make the work piece parallel to the mill table. Is my understanding correct?
 

Dave Paine

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#28
You need to tram the head to ensure it is 90 deg to the table and then when the vise is installed the fixed jaw is parallel to the X axis.

I leveled my mill since I had the precision level, but I am not sure how critical this is since no method to remove twist - if any - in the table.

Leveling the metal lathe is important to remove any twist in the bed. It is amazing how a tiny adjustment of a foot can alter the twist in the metal lathe bed.

I have a set of 1/8in parallels which I use often. I recently purchased some 1/2in thick parallels which are useful but do not get as much use as the 1/8in parallels.

I got a relatively inexpensive precision level from CDCO.

If you need arbors for the drill chucks, I would get R8 arbors. The collet chuck will consume some of your Z axis. If the drill chucks already had a straight arbor, I could imagine using it is a collet chuck, but since you have to get arbors, I would want to minimize the Z axis consumed.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#29
The more level your machines are, the finer work they can produce.
But you can still produce square and parallel work with a machine out of level
Naval machinery is almost never level underway but the macinists can still produce
parts to specifications
 
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ddickey

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#30
Never really thought about leveling the mill.
 
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