I needed a Carriage Stop

louosten

Registered
Registered
Joined
Oct 11, 2013
Messages
88
I have a 12"x24" Taiwanese Lathe dated 1982, and branded as an Enco 92010 model. Pretty good machine, and having been cared for by previous owners, it is still reasonably accurate. It did not come with a carriage stop, which I needed; after doing endless searches for a proper accessory, I came to the conclusion that I'd probably have to make my own. After going through some planning, and finally doing the machining, I came up with this:

Carriage_Stop1.jpg


I know there have been other posts about making carriage stops, so I'll refrain from the boring details unless there is sufficient interest in this particular reincarnation of a useful accessory. Most of the dimensions are not critical, and modifications can be made; but since this would probably fit most of the asian lathe bedways, someone might find the exercise useful.

Let me know, and if it does appear useful to enough people, I'll post some details of the process...

Lou O.
 

DavidR8

Soaking up knowledge!
H-M Platinum Supporter
Joined
Oct 16, 2019
Messages
4,117
Looks good!
Details would be definitely appreciated :)
 

sdelivery

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2020
Messages
320
Nice looking peice. Have you tried it out? I think you are going to want to leave out the springs as you need your stop tight to the way.
I like it and you can continue to modify it as your needs and skills progress.
 

Mitch Alsup

Registered
Registered
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
1,097
If the bolt were replaced with a micrometer head, you could use the stop for both roughing and for the finish pass.

I, also, see no reason for the springs--just a point of weakness.
 

.LMS.

Lathe Noob
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
May 11, 2017
Messages
199
springs make sense to me - push down on the bolts to open the bottom, slide onto the bed, release, it's held in place for tightening instead of the bottom being flippy floppy while tightening.
 

MetalPlane

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Messages
13
Made a similar stop. When using the feed, I couldn't disengage the feed fast enough and ran into the stop. I found the reason they use a "Plastic" drive gear on my Jet 9X20 lathe Expensive lesson. I assume the springs are to avoid this problem. HAve you had a similar problem? do the springs help?
 

Weldingrod1

Registered
Registered
Joined
Oct 14, 2013
Messages
294
I would counter bore a pocket around the clamping screws; going solid on the spring and then squashing it isnt going to make for a happy spring! You want the washers to touch the body.

Otherwise, nice job on the stop!

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

.LMS.

Lathe Noob
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
May 11, 2017
Messages
199
I would counter bore a pocket around the clamping screws; going solid on the spring and then squashing it isnt going to make for a happy spring! You want the washers to touch the body.
If you look closely at the pic, it looks like the OP did exactly that - the bore is wider than the bolts and the springs recess into the bore.

Speaking of the OP, wonder where he went.....
 
It can take up to an hour for ads to appear on the page. See our code implementation guide for more details. If you already have Auto ad code on your pages there's no need to replace it with this code
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock