I purchased a Boley F1 lathe from Europe as an American. (Need Help converting 220v to 110v)

wchris040

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Hello I purchased a Boley F1 lathe from Europe and would like info on how to convert from 220v to 110v and incorporating a foot pedal.

I live in the USA and have heard that the easiest route I can take is to use a VFD to control the speed and output 220v on my 110v apartment connection.

If I take the VFD route what is the best VFD for my needs? I prefer one with a digital screen and knob. What parts/equipment do I need to set up my VFD?

I live in an apartment in California

I have attached a wiring diagram and motor plate spec for the Boley F1 motor below:



Boley f1 power 1.png
 

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Ulma Doctor

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something like this would suffice


the vfd hooks directly to the motor without anything like switches or relays inline
since you only need 60watts at 220v 3 phase, the above cited vfd @750 watts would be more than sufficient
 

markba633csi

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That's a 220 volt only permanent split cap motor, it can't be run on 110 directly. The best approach would be to use a step up transformer for fixed speed, it will run slightly faster on 60 HZ
It's possible you could use a VFD on it also but I would check that the windings are all equal resistances first, in other words make sure it can be treated like a true 3-phase motor
-Mark
 

Ulma Doctor

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European equipment routinely use these types of motors with or without capacitance
when 3phase is available the motors are often run without capacitance
 

markba633csi

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Thanks Mike, I was wondering about that. I'm wondering also if even the smallest VFD would be too big, and might shut itself down with such a small motor load? Maybe not
-M
 
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Ulma Doctor

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I haven’t had issues putting a small motor on a larger vfd, the inverse doesn’t work well
 

talvare

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O.K. Mike, I need some education. I've never worked with a motor like that. Appears to be single phase input running a three phase motor. What are they doing to get that third leg. I see a couple of capacitors, possibly accomplishing some phase angle shift ?

Ted
 

markba633csi

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That's exactly what they do, it's the same principle as a static phase converter. If you look closely you will see the two caps are in parallel, so it's just a single 6 uF cap in essence that gives a phase shift from one power leg to the third leg
-Mark
There are variations, some have a start cap and a smaller run cap, the start cap has a centrifugal cut-out switch
 
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Ulma Doctor

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O.K. Mike, I need some education. I've never worked with a motor like that. Appears to be single phase input running a three phase motor. What are they doing to get that third leg. I see a couple of capacitors, possibly accomplishing some phase angle shift ?

Ted
to add to Mark's explanation, i service a brand of vacuum packaging equipment that uses European vacuum pump/single phase
motor combination.
the motor is 3 phase .75Kw
the input is 220v single phase
the motor's V phase is essentially a 110Uf capacitor across the terminals when wired in the WYE configuration
these motors can be wired Delta too
 
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