[4]

If you need gears... Print them...

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

Ray C

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Likes
1,415
#1
I happen to come across this video from Mr. Pete222 (aka Tubal Cain).
While I did not watch the entire video, it appears that 3D printed gears are available for the Atlas.

Have at it...

Ray C.
 

john.oliver35

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 26, 2014
Messages
118
Likes
66
#2
I watched this last night - the Atlas ran pretty well with the printed gears!
 

Ray C

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Likes
1,415
#3
I watched this last night - the Atlas ran pretty well with the printed gears!
I'd imagine it improves the sound quite a bit.

At the age of 5 or 6, my dad had me working in his shop and by the time I was 7, I was using the 15x54 LeBlond. From the age of 22 to roughly 40, I didn't touch anything shop related. Upon setting-up a garage shop, my starter lathe was an Atlas 618. It took a good long adjustment phase for me :guilty:, and the lathe was eventually rebuilt one piece at a time o_O. I can still hear the sound of those gears rattling away :eek:.


Ray
 

clif

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 8, 2014
Messages
36
Likes
20
#4
I'm printing a 36 tooth test gear right now. It's pla, but a good test as to the abilities to print, and how this gear would respond. It's one of the two gears on the foward reverse lever that seem to wear so much.
 

mattthemuppet2

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Messages
1,636
Likes
938
#5
nice! I have both an Altlas 618 and a 3D printer. I also have a full set of change gears too, but it would be an interesting idea to make up a series of cassettes with the gears premounted to a banjo for the common pitches (18, 20, 32 are ones I'd use a bunch). Not sure I do enough threading to justify the time, but at least the cost of the gears won't be a limiting factor!
 

Ray C

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Likes
1,415
#6
nice! I have both an Altlas 618 and a 3D printer. I also have a full set of change gears too, but it would be an interesting idea to make up a series of cassettes with the gears premounted to a banjo for the common pitches (18, 20, 32 are ones I'd use a bunch). Not sure I do enough threading to justify the time, but at least the cost of the gears won't be a limiting factor!
Even if the cost of 3D printing were higher than getting scalped on eBay, you'd still be better off. I remember purchasing a couple replacement parts for the Atlas and upon arrival, discovered they were worn more than the ones on the lathe. So, of course, that expedited the purchase of a mill -so I could make parts for the lathe... -Sigh...

Ray
 

mattthemuppet2

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Messages
1,636
Likes
938
#7
yeah, that's always a worry too. Even in ABS with 100% fill the largest gear would still only cost ~30c to print (ignoring the cost of the printer of course). I've been really happy with my 618 - I sometimes wish I had a larger lathe, particularly with a larger spindle bore, but for the most part it's been great.
 
D

Deleted member 20190

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#8
At the age of 5 or 6, my dad had me working in his shop and by the time I was 7, I was using the 15x54 LeBlond.
See, I always thought you were spoiled when you were a youngster. Now you admitted it!! :eek:
 

clif

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 8, 2014
Messages
36
Likes
20
#9
Printing done, meshes well with the stock gears, and visually matches the 36 tooth gear on the lathe. Too cold to do much more right now.

Gear printing, on a hictop ender 2, and finished gear. For a $199 printer it doesn't do a bad job.






gear printing.png gear print.png
 

Ray C

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Likes
1,415
#11
See, I always thought you were spoiled when you were a youngster. Now you admitted it!! :eek:
I'll tell y'a Terry, I was indeed spoiled to have that Lathe. It was a gear-head (not servo shift) and it could cut! Naive as I was, I thought everybody's dad had one in their garage. Funny thing though, in this day/age, if "child services" knew that some kid was using a 4000lb, 10HP machine, the father would be taken away in handcuffs.

Ray
 

jocat54

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 25, 2011
Messages
511
Likes
298
#12

cdhknives

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
428
Likes
89
#13
I am really curious as to how many hours of service printed gears like that will give...my tumbler gears are about shot and I have been looking at replacing them. For the cost of them I am more or less halfway to a low end 3D printer...and I have LOTS of ideas for 3D printing.
 

Ray C

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Likes
1,415
#14
I am really curious as to how many hours of service printed gears like that will give...my tumbler gears are about shot and I have been looking at replacing them. For the cost of them I am more or less halfway to a low end 3D printer...and I have LOTS of ideas for 3D printing.
LOL: There was a hidden message in your post. Enjoy the 3D printer... Let us know what one you settle on.


Ray
 

ttabbal

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Jun 12, 2017
Messages
652
Likes
655
#15
If you would rather not buy a printer, I could print a couple gears for people. But don't let that stop you from getting one, they are great tools to have around. :)

If you want me to print things, you need to be able to supply STLs. I don't have time to do gear designs from scratch. :D
 

cdhknives

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
428
Likes
89
#16
It is all about justifying it to the 'budget department...';)
 

cdhknives

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
428
Likes
89
#17
If you would rather not buy a printer, I could print a couple gears for people. But don't let that stop you from getting one, they are great tools to have around. :)

If you want me to print things, you need to be able to supply STLs. I don't have time to do gear designs from scratch. :D
Are the files Clif linked above compatible with your equipment?
 

ttabbal

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Jun 12, 2017
Messages
652
Likes
655
#18
It is all about justifying it to the 'budget department...';)
I know how that goes, all too well. :)

Are the files Clif linked above compatible with your equipment?
Yes, I can print those. I just often get people thinking I can print what's in their head. Though I guess a bunch of machinists would understand that better than most. :)
 

tr7sprint1

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 21, 2016
Messages
39
Likes
9
#19

For those that don't have an 3D printer. You might want to check your local UPS store.

While taking a package to UPS store Lisle, IL a few weeks ago. I noticed that they provided a 3D printing service using ABS plastic, all they needed is an STL file (which the above link provides) to give price of part to print.

I was told by the owner that a few other UPS stores provided this service, but he told he could print and ship.
 

wa5cab

Downloads Moderator
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Dec 25, 2011
Messages
4,259
Likes
1,026
#20
Just so that everyone knows that there ain't no such thing as a free lunch, in general order of decreasing strength and longevity, gears made of various common materials are generally as follows"

Steel
Cast Iron (in some cases this one can be below Zamak)
Zamak
Machined or molded Delrin or Nylon (I'm not sure of the actual order for these four types)
Printed Delrin with Kevlar reinforcing (I'm told that printers start at around $10K)
Printed Delrin.

Which isn't to say that you shouldn't use printed Delrin. Just be prepared for more frequent replacements.
 

mattthemuppet2

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Messages
1,636
Likes
938
#21
I think that makes sense. The plus side with a 3D printer is that there's no cost issue and very little effort required for making more, so the longevity issue becomes less of an issue. Obviously a gear stripping during a crucial threading operation would be a major issue, so time will tell how much warning one would get of failure.
 

Dave Paine

Registered
Registered
Joined
May 10, 2014
Messages
813
Likes
589
#22
There are many types of 3D printer filament. An inexpensive PLA reel of the typical 1.75mm dia is $15 - 20 / kg. I looked at some of the stronger materials, may have been some type of reinforced nylon and carbon fibre filled filament, cost of some products were $375/lb or about $875/kg.

Hence the cost may not be as cheap as desired, but can be cheaper than metal, just may not last as long.

I do like the concept of being able to make a replacement part, even if it does not last as long.

I am close to getting a 3D printer, just pondering which model.
 

agfrvf

Registered
Registered
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
128
Likes
56
#23
Anyone want cast A356 change gears. My originals are good but I can print and cast too.
 

agfrvf

Registered
Registered
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
128
Likes
56
#24
Fyi: PLA gets brittle and weak when exposed to moisture. Use ABS.
 

ttabbal

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Jun 12, 2017
Messages
652
Likes
655
#25
I would suggest Nylon, ABS, or PETG for gears. The filled types aren't really any stronger, they are more for looks. With the possible exception of the type that runs a continuous strand of carbon fiber though the part like the MarkForged.

Obviously, cutting steel gears out would be better. Casting from printed copies would probably be pretty good as well. I would see something like this as a standby while you get something better. They might hold up reasonably well if the torque loads are low enough, I have several printed gears that have a lot of runtime on them. I'm not sure how much force is really on these gears in that lathe. I know a lot of smaller import lathes use plastic gearing though.
 

clif

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 8, 2014
Messages
36
Likes
20
#26
Clif, What printer do you have?
Several;

My first a Anet A6 is undergoing an almost complete rebuild, due to a mother board failure plus the normal upgrades most Chinese prusa i3 clones get. (Got it off Amazon)

The printer I used for this print was a Hictop Ender 2 (Got this one off ebay)

I would recommend this as a starter printer for most who are willing to do a relatively simple build. It took me less than an hour to put it together and get a print started, where as the Anet took over 8 hours. Be forwarned there is a learning curve here, just as with any new type of machine.

As far as material to use to print gears. PLA the easiest to print is the most brittle and weakest, however oil doesn't degrade it. ABS I would NOT recommend because of the problems with both warping and need to exhaust the fumes, PETG is better here, but Nylon is even better.

IF you want to learn a bit more four people with u-tube channels I could recommend are;

Thomas Sanladerer:

Makers Muse

3D Maker Noob

3D Printing Nerd

I know even more u-tube channels to waste time on, however most everything I know I learned from these people and a couple others.


One last thing, I am waiting for the Prusa MK3 from Prusa Research, because I want a better printer to work with, and Josef Prusa is the originator of the I3 design, the chinese are so fond of cloning. Should arrive at the end of the month.
 

clif

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 8, 2014
Messages
36
Likes
20
#27
BTW this is the future;

Iro3D desktop Metal 3D printer

It basically "prints" the sand and metal in a sort of open top mold that is fused in a furnace.
 
Last edited:

easttex

New Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 28, 2015
Messages
25
Likes
15
#28
BTW this is the future;

Iro3D desktop Metal 3D printer

It basically "prints" the sand and metal in a sort of open top mold that is fused in a furnace.
That's actually pretty clever. You'll still need a furnace to fire the crucible in and need final finish (like a lot of castings) but overall, I'd say it's a fairly novel approach.

With the right metal powder and a furnace that's hot enough, you'd certainly get your gears out of it.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

francist

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 5, 2013
Messages
1,007
Likes
1,506
#29
Most if not all Zamak alloys have a pretty low melting point, like just over 700 F. I've often wondered why nobody seems to be casting new gears out of it or some of the other more desirable parts for the Atlas machines.

Maybe not enough demand? Maybe still enough originals around to not make it worthwhile? I've not done any die casting specifically but have been involved with quite a few sand and / or lost wax casting, seems like Zamak would be a fair candidate for either of those processes on a small scale. Or is there a fundamental flaw in my thinking somewhere?

-frank
 

clif

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 8, 2014
Messages
36
Likes
20
#30
The zinc in the casting might be difficult to control in an open casting set up like we do in sand casting. Same reason I try to avoid casting brass, and use bronze instead if I can.

BTW for those with a Atlas 618/craftsman 6" or craftsman 109 lathe gears are here;

http://www.yeggi.com/q/atlas+618/
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top