[4]

I'm making a Halo !!

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So I've been going to church, trying not to cuss, being kind to everyone, and spending some time in my shop in order to get a Halo!!

I bought this raw materials kit http://www.minicastings.com/acatalog/LineyMachine-Halo-Kit.html#SID=31l from Liney Machine. If you follow that link you can see pictures and videos of a couple of these Halo engines completed so you know where I am headed. I bought this "kit" almost 4 years ago and when I received it, I opened it up and realized that it was probably more than I could chew... My skills were rusty, I really hadn't figured out how to make my 3 in 1 jump through hoops, and I didn't have as many tools, etc. as I do now. But now that I have built more than half a dozen engines (several are posted on this site) I thought, "I can do this!".

DavesHalo1.JPG

Above is a picture of about where I am now. Just for reference: the diameter of the crankshaft is 1/4", the OD of the aluminum crankcase is 1.65", diameter of the arbor and the cylinder on it is 3/4", the cylinder heads at this point are .750" x .850" x .625", the major diameter of the cams in the lower right is .780" and the screws are all size 2-56.

I have more pictures of the parts, jigs and setups, etc., etc. With a little encouragement, that is, if someone is interested in seeing more pictures, let me know and I'll post them up!

Best Regards
Dave

PS at least I am doing a couple of the things listed in the first sentence...

DavesHalo1.JPG
 
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DavesHalo2.JPG

The crankcase shown above began life as a piece of 1-3/4" aluminum tube with a 1/4" wall. First I made an arbor to hold it as shown below. I was careful that the arbor was concentric, the end caps were the same thickness, and the shoulders of the back one was a thousandth or so smaller than the desired ID of the part. Then I faced the part on both sides to length and bored the center out to the called for diameter. I was able to use my arbor as go no go gauge for the final pass.

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In the picture above I have mounted the arbor in the lathe and brought a live center against it.

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I turned the arbor and the part down to the desired outside diameter.

DavesHalo5.JPG

Without removing the crankcase from the arbor, I mounted it up in the 5c spin indexer with the tail stock center on the other side. 360 divided by 5 is 72 degrees. Notice I used little pieces of colored vinyl tape to mark the holes on both sides of the indexer because I wanted some help to not make a mistake! In the picture above I have already milled the flats for the cylinders and I have center drilled the first hole. Next I drilled a hole slightly smaller than the desired .501" hole. Then I used a boring head to bring it out to the exact finished size.

DavesHalo6.JPG
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Then I drilled the 4 cylinder mounts number 50 drill holes around each cylinder hole. Thank God for DROs.

Only now did I remove the part from the arbor. I don't have any pictures of the next steps, but I mounted the ring horizontally, carefully dialed in one of the flats and drilled the 5 number 50 holes through the ring. These holes are to mount the cam housing on the front and will be used somehow the mount the whole engine to the yet to be designed base.

I started hand tapping all these 2-56 holes in this part, 30 of them! I quickly realized I was losing what little is left of my sanity. So I up the part in a vice and used a small level to level one flat. Then I put this tiny tap in my cordless variable speed electric drill that has a bubble level on back so you can see you are drilling a hole straight down. Zip Zap. I had all the holes tapped in about 10 minutes.

DavesHalo2.JPG DavesHalo3.JPG DavesHalo4.JPG DavesHalo5.JPG DavesHalo6.JPG DavesHalo7.JPG
 

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Halo Cam Housing

HaloCamHousing.JPG
HaloCamHousingback.JPG

This piece was made from an 1-3/4' round aluminum rod.
I cut the "nose" first down to one inch. I used the compound and shaved the area that is rounded at like 22 degrees, then 45 degrees then 67 degrees. Then I used a file to create the round shape.
Then I turned it around and chucked it up in 1" collet and step drilled the hole in the back and eventually all the way through with a drill just under 3/8. Then I ran a .374 reamer through the front. Then I carefully bored the lip or shelf for the front main bearing and the bigger hole for the cams. I faced the back and turned the OD from the same setup so that everything is concentric.

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In the pictures above, I have the part mounted on a mandrel or arbor inside a 5c chuck that I have already dialed in to the center of the rotary table in vertical position. I'm using a .090 pin and a #43 drill bit in the holes that will be used to mount the housing to the crankcase. I want the holes for the rod plungers / cam followers to be exactly between them.

IMG_0600 (Large).JPG

In the picture above, I am using a center drill to start the rod plunger holes. These holes are at a 7.5 degree offset and .052 off of center. This so the cam followers for each cylinder will be in line on the inside. See the second picture above in this post that shows the back of the cam housing. The holes that you can see on the top of OD are in a 15 degree V and yet on the ID they are lined up so the cam followers will roll on the same line across the top of the two cams that will be in the cam housing.


IMG_0601 (Large).JPG

In the picture above is of chasing a previously drilled hole with a .126" reamer . I center drilled, then drilled, then reamed all the intake cam follower holes. Then I changed the setup to the exhaust and did the same spot, drill, ream.

HaloCamHousing.JPG HaloCamHousingback.JPG IMG_0598 (Large).JPG IMG_0599 (Large).JPG IMG_0600 (Large).JPG IMG_0601 (Large).JPG
 

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Halo Crankshaft

HaloCrankShaft.JPG

I decided to make the crankshaft from a piece of 5/8" 303 stainless steel. The material kit came with a 5/8 round aluminum bar, but I thought that the crank should be stronger than aluminum.

IMG_3062 (Large).JPG

Above is my setup for making the crankshaft. The "face plate" above is actually the back of my 4 jaw chuck. I've drilled a few extra holes in it for various and sundry parts I've made. The extra holes don't hurt it for it's original intended purpose. I turned this part between centers because I want it absolutely concentric. I used my diamond (shaped) tool and holder because I can face and turn with the same tool and get a nice inside corner. Also, it does a very nice job of cutting this stainless. The dimension between the two shoulders on this where the main bearing IDs rest against and the same dimension inside the cam housing for the OD of the bearings is quite critical. You don't want any slop and you can't have any side loading on these little bearings either. So I cut the distance between the shoulders a little big. Then I test fit the crankshaft between the cam housing and the rear bearing carrier, shaved a tiny bit off, test fit, rinse and repeat.

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The picture above is the crankcase, crankshaft, cam housing and the rear bearing carrier.

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HaloCrankShaft.JPG IMG_3062 (Large).JPG IMG_3069 (Large).JPG IMG_3070 (Large).JPG IMG_3071 (Large).JPG
 

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Making the Halo Cylinders

cylinder1 .JPG
Cylinder2.JPG

The cylinders were made from 3/4" square 360 brass bar. I cut them to length. I also cut the .500 shoulder than fits down into the hole in the crankcase, in fact I used the crankcase as my go gauge for the right diameter. Then I drilled and reamed the cylinder hole the piston will run in through the part. I used a .374 reamer and later I will "hone" them.

Cylinder3.JPG

There are four blind holes in top of the cylinder that are tapped 2-56 to bolt on the heads. There are four #43 holes though on the bottom used to bolt the cyl to the crankcase. I decided to drill these other holes now while the cylinders are still rectangular. Note the stop attached to the upper or back left of the vise. I used an edge finder to precisely locate the first part. Then I located the first hole and used the center drill to spot the first hole. I removed that part and carefully and cleanly inserted the second part in the vise against the stop. Spot it. Put in the third part, etc etc ad nauseam. Then I switched to the (#50 or #43) drill and drilled the first hole in the same place in all the parts. Now with the DRO I moved mill and the drill to the second hole position and ran all the parts carefully and cleanly through the vise, oriented in the exact same position as the first hole. I could have, perhaps, rotated the parts 90 degrees with the same setup, however, in my experience, if you want these holes in the exact location to each other, you damn well better be locating all the parts off the same three surfaces. Tedious for sure, but IMO much faster and easier than jockeying the mill around to all four holes on each part. Obviously, this would have been a great time to have CNC.


cylinder4.JPG

Now I made the arbor shown above from 12L14 steel. I also made the "washers" for the ends of the part from 1/8" aluminum flat. These washers are easy to make, I just drilled the right size ID hole in the aluminum, take it to the band saw to roughly cut the OD, then mount them on the arbor, turn the OD down to size. This setup let me hold these parts perfectly for the next couple operations!

cylinder5.JPG

Above, the OD on the exposed part of the cylinder has been turned from 3/4" square to 3/4" round. The live center shown in the picture was used for this operation.

cylinder6.JPG

Setting up for the taper or half hourglass shape that is cut on the bottom of the cylinder. Note the dial indicator in the lower left. I dialed in the back of the tool post to be square with the ways of the lathe (x axis). Then I can use the dial indicator to tell me how far I in or out along the cross slide (y axis) I have moved the tool USING the compound slide of the tool post, which was set a hair less then 30 degrees. I hope I'm making myself clear if anyone reads this.

Cylinder7.JPG

Cutting the taper.

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A finished taper

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Cutting the "cooling fins" above. I had a little .025" wide part off blade. The fins are .025 wide and deep at the top.

Cylinder11.JPG

TAA DAA !!

cylinder1 .JPG Cylinder2.JPG Cylinder3.JPG cylinder4.JPG cylinder5.JPG cylinder6.JPG Cylinder7.JPG cylinder8.JPG cylinder9.JPG cylinder10.JPG Cylinder11.JPG
 

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Making the Halo Cylinder Heads

HaloHead1.JPG

HaloHead2.JPG

The Halo Heads are made from 3/4" (.750") brass bar. I cut them a 1/16 or so over the length with my HF 4x6 band saw.

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This is the setup I used to cut them down to .850" length

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Cutting them down to .650" tall

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I think I counted 20 different set ups to do these parts. There are 19 holes drilled in each head. Seven of them are threaded 2-56, two of them are reamed .126", two of them are counter-bored and there is a .06" wide by .05" deep slot for the exhaust port. I'm not going to bore either one of us with all these setups. Most were like the one shown above, simply a small vice with a stop. I used an edge finder to precisely locate the first part. Then I located and did the first hole (or whatever). I removed that part and carefully and cleanly inserted the second part in the vise against the stop. Do it. Put in the third part, etc etc ad nauseam. Shown above is actually one of the last operations on the heads.

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I realized that the six holes that were drilled for the valve covers times 5 heads plus 6 holes times 5 valve covers is a heck of a lot of holes! (not to mention I made at least one extra part for setups and screw ups!) So I made the little drill jig shown above to fit both the heads and the valve covers. With the jig I was able to drill all 60 plus holes zip zap using the mill as a drill press. I drilled heads first with a #50 drill and later I drilled the covers with a #43 drill.

I hope someone is enjoying reading this or at least looking at the pictures...

Best Regards,
Dave

HaloHead1.JPG HaloHead2.JPG HaloHead3.JPG HaloHead4.JPG HaloHead4a.JPG HaloHead5.JPG HaloHead6.JPG HaloHead7.JPG HaloHead8.JPG
 

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Rather than saying 20 setups above, a better word would be operations. Still several setups. Thanks! Dave
 

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Halo Valve Plungers

Plunger1.JPG

The Halo uses a pair of 3/16" diameter balls as the valves for intake and exhaust. The balls seat down in a counterbored hole in the head. Air pressure (and I guess a small spring) hold them seated and prevent the air pressure (or steam) from entering or exiting the cylinder. The Valve Plungers, one shown above, displace ball from its seat allowing air to pass. The rocker arms press the plungers down when the push rods and the cam followers move them..

Plunger2.JPG

The plungers start out as 1/4" (.250") brass rod. I carefully turned the .125" shaft of them to be a slip fit in the .126" reamed holes in the head for them. Too tight or rough and there will be too much friction for them to move freely. Too loose and the compressed air will leak out around them and degrade performance. The head of the plunger is rounded to reduce friction with the rocker arms.


Above is a short video of how I rounded the head of the Valve Plungers. I like watching it. It does seem like I should have moved the ball turner further away before sticking my fingers in there! I used a 1/8" 5C collet with a stop in the back to hold all the plungers in the same place. I experimented with my ball turner to get a nice looking radius.

Plunger3.JPG

The above is "the making of the movie" photo!

Cheers
Dave

Plunger1.JPG Plunger2.JPG Plunger3.JPG
 
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"Grinding" the Halo Cams

HaloCam1.JPG

Above is a picture of the Cams for the Halo. I started with a piece of 7/8" diameter round brass rod. With the lathe, I drilled the hole through the center and faced it. Then I cut one off and faced the next one and cut it off. Then, using a 5C collet stop, I faced the other side of the parts to the correct thickness.

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Mounted on the crankshaft

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Another view

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Inside the Cam Housing. Once inside the cam housing, .125 diameter ball bearings are dropped inside the cam follower holes and they will roll on the outside eccentric off of the cam. The cam followers will be "above" the ball bearings and will push the push rods.

HaloCam5.JPG

In the setup above, I have made an arbor to fit the cams. I drill through the cams with a #43 drill but NOT into the arbor. There is an aluminum washer underneath the bottom cam and I didn't drill through it. I had previously used this same setup to #50 drill and tap the 2-56 cam mounting holes in the crankshaft, and the crank pin mounting hole in the crank.

HaloCam6.JPG

I mounted the rotary table with the cam arbor in the center of it, found the center of the arbor, and set the rotary table on zero degrees. Then I drilled two #50 holes and tapped them 2-56 threads. Then I screwed the cams down onto the arbor.

Halocam7.JPG

Above is the map I used to cut the eccentrics using the side of a .250" endmill.

What do you think? When I assemble it, what kind of grease do you think I should use on the cams / bearings / followers?

Take Care
Dave

HaloCam1.JPG HaloCam2.JPG HaloCam3.JPG HaloCam4.JPG HaloCam5.JPG HaloCam6.JPG Halocam7.JPG
 

mgalusha

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Lovely work, some day maybe I'll have that kind of time. Please keep it coming.
 

savarin

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I am in awe of anyone who can do this quality of work.
Thanks for sharing and I eagerly await further installments.
 

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Rocker Arms for the Halo

Rocker1.JPGRocker2.JPG

The rocker arms began life as a 1/8" x 3/4" aluminum flat extrusion. I decided to use the natural sides of the bar as the tops of the rockers. I cut them on the band saw and then milled the ends to the desired overall length.

Rocker3.JPGRocker4.JPG

I drilled the required holes in the parts first. I used a sharpy to mark the desired shape and took them to the HF band saw set up in vertical to cut them out.

Rocker5.JPG

A couple passes with the milling cutter to finish the shape. De-burring the little buggers was fun, I must have dropped each one four times! Lastly I tapped the 2-56 for the socket headed cap screw that will hold the end of the push rod in the socket and allow me to adjust the valves...

IMG_3183 (Small).JPG

This is Rev, one of my pygmy goats.

Rocker1.JPG Rocker2.JPG Rocker3.JPG Rocker4.JPG Rocker5.JPG IMG_3183 (Small).JPG
 

Bishop

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I love watching posts like this one, building something with that much forethought, patients and skill is awesome.
 

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Making the Halo Pistons

Well, I was back in the shop today, thank goodness.

Piston1.JPG

The pistons were made from 3/8" 360 brass round bar. One of the pistons connects to the "Master Rod" so the slot for the connecting rod is smaller than the other four pistons. In the picture above the two pistons closest to the camera have been deburred and polished. The ones in the back have not been deburred. The wrist pin is a .0625" round pin that is a press fit.

Piston2.JPG

First I cut the pistons to the overall length. In the picture above, there are the piston billets, a small center drill, a #53 drill, a .0615" ream, a .061" gage pin, a .062" gage pin, and a US quarter dollar coin.

Piston3.JPG

Shown above is my setup for the second operations on the pistons. I have a 3/8" 5C Collet with a collet stop in the other end, secured in a vise, mounted on the mill. The photo above shows the small center drill in the drill chuck. Each part was tightened into the collet, center drilled, drilled through with the #53 / .059" drill, then reamed with the .0615" reamer. I used the .061" gauge pin to check the GO and the .062" pin as the NOGO.


Piston4.JPG

After all the parts were drilled, I changed over to the slitting saw. I want the slot perpendicular to the hole for the wrist pin. So in the photo above I used the .061" pin and another small piece of aluminum with a .0615" hole also in it to line the piston up before tightening the collet.

Piston5.JPG

The slitting saw is .0625" thick, but with run out and what not, it cut .065" which is what the Master piston slot requires. For the other pistons, I moved the cutter up .030" from 0 center, made a pass, moved it down .030" below center and cut the second pass, changed to the next part, made a pass, moved it up, made the second pass, changed parts....

I deburred them with a jewelers file and polished them with a cloth wheel on a dremel.

Piston1.JPG Piston2.JPG Piston3.JPG Piston4.JPG Piston5.JPG
 

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Halo Master Connecting Rod

Mrod1.JPG
Mrod2.JPG

This is the Master Connecting Rod for the engine. It is connected to the crank pin on one end and the "master" piston on the other. The other four connecting rods connect to it instead of the crank. Well, this is one of the parts for this engine that seemed to require a lot of thought and twitter pating on my part about how to make it. I guess because it is so small. Then I had an epiphany that I could make it longer than it needed to be so it could be held it on both ends and then cut it down to size. It was made from a small piece of 1/16" thick Brass 3/4" x 2". There was enough material to make two and I thought I should in case I made a mistake...

Mrod3.JPG

I used my DRO and drilled the holes first using a tiny bolt circle pattern. The hole for the crank pin is reamed .126" and guess what, a 5-40 screw is a slip fit in a 1/8" hole. I drilled another hole in the material a quarter inch past the end of the part away from the hole for the wrist pin.

Mrod4.JPG

Above is a picture of the parts after drilling the holes, slapping some Dykem on them, and scribing the general shape of the part on it. This is for reference for the next steps.

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I used the band saw to saw most of the way through between the two parts and then I used a piercing saw to separate them.

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I mounted up my trusty rusty rotary table and dialed in the center of it and set it on zero degrees. Then I mounted a sacrificial piece of aluminum on top of the table. I shaved the top of the aluminum with a fly cutter because there were scars from another battle on it. I drilled and tapped a 5-40 screw hole at 0, 0 and another at x = 0 y = 1.038 for my other hold down. In the picture above I have screwed the part down and milled around the crank pin end to create that end of the part

Mrod8.JPG

Above I have milled away one side of the long skinny part of the rod.

Mrod9.JPG

In order to easily make both sides of the part a mirror of each other, I simply deburred the part a little and flipped it over and remounted it.

Mrod10.JPG

Milled off the other side. It probably took me an hour to mill the first part and literally ten minutes to do the second.

Mrod11.JPG

At this point the parts look like the part on the top of the above photograph. The part on the bottom is after I took it to my one inch sanding belt and shaped the pentagonal part of the crank end. I have also waylaid it with a file or two..
Next I took a hack saw and cut off the big flag that is on the left side of the photo past the wrist pin hole. Then I did the final shaping and sizing of that end of the part with the 1" sanding belt and more filing.

Mrod12.JPG

Above I have just put the part in the crank case to admire it.

I hope that you are enjoying reading this and looking at the pictures.

Thanks and Best Regards - Dave

Mrod1.JPG Mrod2.JPG Mrod3.JPG Mrod4.JPG Mrod5.JPG Mrod6.JPG Mrod7.JPG Mrod8.JPG Mrod9.JPG Mrod10.JPG Mrod11.JPG Mrod12.JPG
 
D

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This is the part I have been longing to see . The master rod and its connecting links it seems to bring it all together.

Not long now Brian.
 

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Yes, Brian, it does bring it together. I have the other 4 connecting rods cut to size, I may have them completed tomorrow. I have to finish the rocker arm shafts and make the push rods. Then I believe all the parts will be made. Oh, I just remembered, I have to design and make the stand / base to hold the completed engine. I want something so that you can look into the back of the crankcase to see the crank and connecting rods in action. And I will need an intake manifold of some kind. Also, after I get it running, I want to make a flywheel that is functional and appropriate. I'm uncertain now just how much of a flywheel it will need. I think I want a propeller for show and maybe a flywheel for go and it would be great if I can get something working for both. Of course there is probably considerable tinkering and assembly / dis-assembly to get it to run! But, it won't be long now before it is done.

Dave
 
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Hi Dave
As you have 5 power impulses per revolution you will require very little inertia to make this run smoothly, the power strokes will overlap I think .

Brian.
 

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The other Rods and their Crank Pins

Rods1.JPG

The picture above shows a test fitting of the connecting rods assembly. There are little tiny 1/16" diameter by 1/8" long crank pins to attach the (slave?) connecting rods to the master connecting rod.

Rods2.JPG

The slave rods are made from 1/8" Square Brass (360). I cut them a little long with the band saw. Then with the lathe I finished the ends and brought them to final length using the 5C collet shown above with a stop in it.

Rods3.JPG

Well, I had originally thought about doing these parts with the pistons... Then I thought, no, I should use a vise... Well, couldn't figure out how to hold these little boogers in the same place in any of the vises I have. So, back to Plan A. Virtually the same setup as the pistons all over again <sigh>

Rods4.JPG

Above I'm getting ready to saw the slot where the Rod fits over the Master Rod. I carefully put the radius on that end of the part with the 1" sanding belt. (I'm glad I had a few extra).

Rods5.JPG

I made the little connecting rods from some 1/16" diameter 303 stainless round. If you look above where I made the pistons you will see the same piece of aluminum that I used to line up the hole versus the slot in the pistons. This piece of aluminum is 1/8" thick. I reamed the hole in it with a 1/16" ream (it had previously been .0615"). Did you know aluminum spelled backwards is pronounced muni mu la ?

Rods6.JPG

Then I backed up that piece of aluminum with another and clamped it it the vise. While pressing and turning the ss rod into the hole, I sawed it off with a cutting wheel in the Dremel.

Rods7.JPG

Do you see the part in the fixture above? I don't either, so I made some extras. At least one of them is somewhere on the floor of my shop. I was thinking how in the heck am I going to deburr these little rascals. I decided NOT to. Cutting them off this way did leave a very little "head" on them like a little rivet, but the top of the rivet was smooth. The little head keeps the pin from falling through the rod, easing the assembly.

Rods8.JPG

Above I trial assembled all the rods and put them on the crank. Boy am I glad I did! I had not sufficiently rounded the lower end of some of the slave rods, and they would not wag back and forth and didn't want to spin around the master crank pin. So more radiusing and deburring was performed. Assembling like this shown above was a piece of cake compared to later when I had to assemble it in the crankcase, with the cylinders mounted and the pistons on the top of the rods. That was like assembling a ship in a bottle. Still, I really think this is a clever clever design!

Rods9.JPG

This is my "special" cat, he gets to spend a lot of time in the house. He was a "gift" from my daughter. The way you read "gift" is, he came home from college with her, but then he never left...

Several more easy things to do but the engine is getting close to being done now and I am Jonesing to see it running.

Thanks for looking over this.

best regards,
Dave

Rods1.JPG Rods2.JPG Rods3.JPG Rods4.JPG Rods5.JPG Rods6.JPG Rods7.JPG Rods8.JPG Rods9.JPG
 
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Making the Head Gaskets

Gasket1.JPG

The picture above is my first attempt at making a head gasket for my halo. I looked at it and thought, "There is a small possibility that it might work, but it sure looks like s#!^." And I needed to make at least 4 more.
I had already decided I was going to make the valve cover gaskets by drilling through them in the jig shown above where I drilled the valve cover holes in the valve covers and in the heads. I make a valve cover gasket with that jig and it came out great! So I decided to make a quick jig to make the head Gaskets.

Gasket2.JPG
Gasket3.JPG

Set up the drill press and the mill so I could cut both sized holes in the gasket without removing it from the jig.

Gasket4.JPG

Holes drilled.

Gasket5.JPG

I dropped a 3/8" pin in a cylinder and then into the hole in the gasket. I traced around the cylinder and cut off the outside with scissors.

This method made much nicer looking and hopefully functional Head Gaskets. Mr Gasket is laughing I'm sure. I needed the gaskets because I want to double check the length of push rods before I made them. And of course, I will need the gaskets soon.

Dave

Gasket1.JPG Gasket2.JPG Gasket3.JPG Gasket4.JPG Gasket5.JPG
 

Dataporter

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Looks like we have a runner!


I installed one cylinder head on the completed crankcase. I am going to make sure each cylinder is running one at a time because I think it would be pretty difficult to determine that all cylinders are "firing" if I connected them all at the same. Not to mention, I'm still deciding how I want to make the intake manifold that will feed all five.

None the less, I was pretty excited that the one cylinder runs this well pulling all the pistons etc with really little air pressure, only 10psi. The flywheel is borrowed from my Small Marine Engine that is also posted on this site.
 
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Congratulations cant wait to see all five working .

Brian.
 

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Dress rehearsal on all five cylinders.


After much assembly, dis-assembly, tweaking, tinkering and reassembly etc, it is running nicely on all five cylinders now. It still needs to be broken in some more. The more I run it, the smoother it gets.
I need to pretty it up a little, etc., but it is pretty much done now! I'm very pleased with the way it turned out. This is really a very cleaver design!

Thanks for reading this and looking at the pictures. Best Regards, Dave
 
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Congratulations well deserved.
Brian.
 

sgisler

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That is truly awesome! I can't imagine the patience necessary to fiddle with all those tiny parts!
Love it!


Stan,
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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