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[4]

Indexing head vs rotary table with indexing plates

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wrmiller

Chief Tinkerer
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#2
For me, it's the ability to set angles.

How's Longmont? We spent about four and a half years up there, in the NE part of town near the golf course. Nice town. Too cold in the winter though. ;)
 

benmychree

John York
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#3
A regular dividing head can divide a multitude of divisions that a rotary table with plates cannot, being limited to the number of divisions allowed by the plates. A universal dividing head can divide literally nearly any desired number of divisions, including prime numbers. If one has a special dividing plate for a regular dividing head, angles can be also divided to a high degree of fineness and accuracy.
 

starr256

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#4
First, the weather is as changeable as ever. Snow one day, 70'F the next. My question is related to clock making, an endeavor to be. I have looked at making a small indexing head for the wheels, but that seems to require the making of indexing plate, which requires sone form of indexing facility. Sort of a chicken and the egg issue. Or an MC Escher thing. Anyway, started looking at options and got more confused, hence the request for enlightenment.
 

benmychree

John York
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#5
We don't have snow here, but I hear you, one day 85 degrees, 55 the next day! In my opinion, if the goal is making gears for a clock or anything else, a dividing head is the necessary tool; a rotary table could be used as well if it had a dividing attachment, that is the table would have a worm drive and dividing plates as does a true dividing head; as I previously noted, an indexer has generally only one indexing plate, and is limited to a small number of divisions, perhaps 24 in most of them.
 
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