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Insert holder

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Lordbeezer

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#1
What type of holder is best for this type of insert.i mostly I grind my own.have brazed carbide ..a triangle insert holder but not this type..? I have a qctp..
 
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Lordbeezer

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#2
I'm thinking picture might help image.jpeg
 

benmychree

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#3
If those inserts, (or rather blanks) are made to be brazed on, chances of getting a clamp type holder to hold them securely enough to thread are between slim and none; insert threading tools that I have seen have some sort of feature, like a prismatic bottom that secures them in the holder so they cannot be slid sideways and also a stop in back to keep them from sliding backwards.
 
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Lordbeezer

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#4
I can braze these on square stock and be good? I totally understand this is a very basic but I rather ask than guess.thanks for your time
 

Glenn Goodlett

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#5
You can braze them on square stock then grind them to your liking just fine, but, brazed carbide tooling is cheap. Why bother?
 
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Lordbeezer

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#6
Because just picked up several boxes of inserts and have bunch more stuck somewhere.don't think it will take but 2-3 minutes to braze..and just because..haha
 

benmychree

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#7
These are silver brazed onto steel shanks; the silver used is plated onto a thin copper sheet, the copper serves as a cushion for the carbide blank; the blank is placed in a step machined into the shank, everything having been thoroughly cleaned with a solvent, then generously fluxed with silver solder flux, the silver (shim) is placed on the shank, the blank on the shim, and the shank is heated with an oxy/fuel torch from the bottom to a low red, then some on top until the silver flows, then using a tool, such as a old screwdriver or awl, pressure is put against the top of the blank until the silver solidifies, then the tool should be put in a place to cool slowly until cold, then it can be ground.
Where I served my apprenticeship, we made up thousands of tools in this way for facing and beveling steel pipe, and also used them in our machine shop for heavy roughing jobs and interrupted cuts, they had 1" square shanks. First the torch was used for brazing, then later they bought an induction brazing machine, where a shaped water cooled coil partially encircled the tip of the tool leaving the area on top in the carbide blank exposed; set it up, push the button, and the machine would cycle the required time to heat the tool, cycle off, and (the operator) would manually push the blank in place; a few minutes in a day's work.
 
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Lordbeezer

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#8
Thanks for info
 

benmychree

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#9
You likely could get by without the silver/copper sandwich for lighter duty work, they make silver solder in strips also.
 
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