[Lathe] Interesting Lathe on CL

francist

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Very interesting indeed. Looks more heavy-duty than precision, and some pretty aggressive pitch on the carriage travel lead screw as well.

-frank
 

magu

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I don't have anything useful to say, but that's a pretty cool looking lathe.
 

Nogoingback

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Very interesting indeed. Looks more heavy-duty than precision, and some pretty aggressive pitch on the carriage travel lead screw as well.

-frank
I noticed that lead screw thread: never seen a thread like that before. It would be nice if they gave basic dimensions like swing and bed length, but it looks smallish. I wonder if it was built with a specific purpose in mind. The v-shape to the bed would make it pretty rigid I would think.
 

francist

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Agreed. I came up blank for information both at the vintage machinery site as well as the lathes uk site. Might find something yet though, I'll keep poking around.

-frank
 

Nogoingback

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I found one reference to them being incorperated in or before 1926, and that they offered mills and shapers as well as lathes. Perhaps they went out of business during the Depression, which would explain the lack of info.

If it's that old I presume it's a converted line shaft machine, though it doesn't really look like it.
 
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francist

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I found one reference to them being incorperated in or before 1926, and that they offered mills and shapers as well as lathes. Perhaps they went out of business during the Depression.
That's better fortune than I've had.
I wonder if Flanagan isn't the dealer tag. The manufacturer may be entirely different and more likely to appear on what looks like a speed range chart down by the handwheels. Which of course we don't have a picture of...

-frank
 

francist

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And who says crime doesn't pay!

Great to find the info on it, and especially the better photos. We have a lead screw exactly like that at my work -- as part of a double extension screw for a very long dining table, no less. Very strange.

The time frame 1920's - 1930's fits right in to what Nogoingback found for Flanagan though. Seems like a pretty uncommon machine.

-frank
 

Nogoingback

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That's better fortune than I've had.
I wonder if Flanagan isn't the dealer tag. The manufacturer may be entirely different and more likely to appear on what looks like a speed range chart down by the handwheels. Which of course we don't have a picture of...

-frank
I got the impression that they were the manufacturer, but of course I could be wrong. But if they didn't make them, who did?
 

francist

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As far as I see it, Artisan Manufacturing Co in Ohio was the maker and Flanagan Machinery Co in Oakland would have been the dealer. At least that is my interpretation of the two labels. Could be mistaken though, would not be the first time.

-frank
 
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