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Inverse boring?

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strantor

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I'm on a jobsite, standing by for other people to do their job before I can do mine, so I'm scrolling through DIY & CNC videos (the AI @ Facebook has me pretty well pegged) and this comes up. The whole video is worth a watch but this post is specifically about the process starting around 2:05. The bot whips a boring head out of its pocket, flips the cutter from an outie to an innie, and proceeds to turn the OD of an oddly angled tapered shaft with it. I've watched probably hundreds, maybe thousands of hours of machining videos in the past 10 years, what with all my commode time and insomnia, and never seen anything like that. You guys ever heard of such a thing?
 

derf

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That's pretty common for things that need turned but won't fit in a lathe. That's how I turned the trunnions on my cannon barrel.
 

macardoso

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The unique thing in that video is that the boring head comes with an motorized attachment that adjusts the diameter programatically on the fly. Pretty uncommon feature, but really the only way to machine that feature in the video.
 

682bear

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Yes... I've done that several times machining straight outside diameters on a manual mill... sometimes its easier and quicker to do that than to take a part out of the mill, set it up on the lathe, turn the OD, then take it back out of the lathe and set it back up on the mill...

-Bear
 

P. Waller

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Not at all unusual, if a boring operation will work on the inside it will also work on the outside.

In the past I have made slotting saw arbors in a mill by holding the part in the spindle and the cutting tool in a vice on the table.
Any method that works is "correct" regardless of what anyone may tell you.

"Make It Happen" is how new tools are developed.
 
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