[4]

Is an old domestic lathe worth the same as a new import lathe?

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

tyronejk

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Sep 20, 2017
Messages
5
Likes
4
#1
Around where I live outside of Atlanta, I frequently find old lathes on Craigslist listed for about the same as new import lathe (using PrecisionMatthews lathes as a reference, since they're supposedly one of the good import lathes). The lathes I'm looking at are around 10"-12" by 20"-28".

I see a lot of guys find old South Bends and the like for $600-800 up north, so I'm not sure if $2500 for an old South Bend (and most don't seem to come with much tooling) is worth it. I have a couple of years of experience machining as a hobby, so it's not enough to be able to restore a really beat-up machine and I'd like to get started making parts rather than turning the lathe itself into a project.

So for roughly the same cost, would you recommend sticking with old iron or new chinesium? I'd be using the machine for hobby projects. 90% of it will probably be aluminum <2" diameter and tolerances of +/- 1 thou is probably sufficient.
 

Dave Paine

Brass
Registered
Joined
May 10, 2014
Messages
813
Likes
597
#2
I think many of us have wrestled with this question or a similar question of old domestic iron vs used import iron. I wrestled with the latter.

I was looking to get my first metal lathe around 2014. I had been looking at various lathes on Craigslist. I had seen a Grizzly G9249 about 2 hrs drive but did not go and look at this. I am also a hobbyist. I was expecting to be working with mostly aluminium, some steel, and perhaps some operations with wood which were giving me issues on my wood lathe such as drilling deep holes.

I purchased a well used Southbend Heavy 10 in May 2014, about 1 1/2hr drive. I spent the time to clean it up from the decades of grease and compressed air having forced chips and dirt into every crevice. I spent a good month cleaning this up. It only had a 6in scroll chuck and lantern style tool post. Very little tooling.

I replaced the felts in the saddle when I had this apart. I replaced the bearings in the QCGB when I had this apart. I cut off the old flat belt and replaced with flat nylon/rubber belt. I added a Phase II QCTP.

I replaced the single phase motor with 3 phase motor and VFD. By October 2014 I was beginning to appreciate features which I desired in a lathe, such as DRO and a flat top compound which was easy to mount a magnetic base. I also found the short bed to be too short from some of the wood drilling I wanted to perform.

I started looking around again. I found another used Grizzly G9249 about 15 mins drive which had DRO already installed, an Adjust-Tru style chuck, a Phase II QCTP and the original 6in scroll chuck, 8in 4 jaw chuck and 10in face plate. I went to look at this and decided to purchase. The seller was likely the second owner. I think the first owner was a company. Well taken care by the seller, but some wear over time. I decided to get this lathe and use it often. I still have the Southbend but may sell this.

Once I got the Grizzly G9249 which has a dial on the carriage as do many lathe today, then went back to the Southbend, I really missed having a carriage dial. I know I can use a dial indicator and stops, but I love being able to read off from a carriage dial.

The seller replaced the Grizzly G9249 with a Grizzly G4003G. He wanted this lathe for potential gunsmith work. He added DRO and replaced the single phase motor with 3 phase and VFD. He is very happy with the lathe, gets good tolerances. He does miss the Adjust-Tru style chuck from the old Grizzly.

If I had to choose between old iron and NEW good quality Asian import for similar price, I personally would go with a new good quality Asian import. This is likely a very personal decision.
 

ttabbal

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Jun 12, 2017
Messages
726
Likes
722
#3
You're in the same boat I am apparently. When I started looking into machines, I kept hearing "get an old US machine for $500 with tooling". Yeah, maybe in some areas. Not here. A decent condition machine here goes for $3000ish without tooling. You usually get a chuck, maybe one home ground HSS bit. It's just supply and demand, but it sucks. :)

There are a couple reasons I have a PM-1127 on the way.

As I haven't run a lathe in years, and never set one up, I don't have the experience to properly evaluate a used machine. It could be crap that barely runs, or it could be great. I would be guessing. At the moment, I'm interested in using a lathe, not fixing one. Assuming it can be fixed. Wear on the ways could be near impossible to fix without other machine tools I don't have. I can see how fixing up old machines can be fun, but I would need a working machine to fix many things.

I get support and warranty from a US based company. In this case, PM. They are well regarded around here for taking care of their customers. So if I get it and have a broken part or whatever, they will help me out. A used machine is as-is 99% of the time. If it's broken, you get the keep both pieces.

A new machine comes with a good set of accessories. Steady/follow rests, usually 3 and 4 jaw chucks, change gears, etc.. Those parts add up fast. If I'm not getting the machine cheap, I'm out even more money trying to hunt down those parts, if I want them. It doesn't help that a lot of people list them as "vintage" to try to get more money for old used tools. For the same money, I'd rather have them up front, knowing they are in good condition and will fit my machine. In my case, it also comes with a QCTP, most used machines I've seen locally have a lantern style toolpost. Particularly old US iron. Adding one often involves some machining on the compound. I get one pre-installed and ready to go.

I find the disdain for "chinesium" amusing. Just about everything is made there these days. You can't get away from it. Not everything is Harbor Freight quality from there. They build to the price/specs of the customer ordering things. To be sure, you can get a ton of cheap crap there. But you can get good quality too, you just have to pay for it, like anywhere else. A good importer will walk the line trying to get the best quality for the money. A cheap one (HF) will cut every corner and leave a rounded off bolt. From what I can tell PM is a good importer. I'll know more in a few days. I also considered Grizzly. I went with PM in large part due to the reputation they have here and that when I compared all the features and included accessories, PM was a better value.

As mentioned above, it's a personal decision. It depends on what you are after and what you want out of the machine. The best any of us can do is tell you why we chose the way we did. Now, if I could get a new US made quality machine for a similar price range, I'd be all over that. But it doesn't exist. We don't make things in the US anymore. And those that do have largely gone the corner cutting route. Even what used to be good brands. For example, I blew the gearbox in a Makita drill last night. My wife couldn't believe it, her father had one that lasted 20 years that worked harder. Crap plastic gears. I was drilling a hole in wood, going from 3/4" to 1". Nothing particularly tough. My older Rigid with crap old batteries plowed through it, and another one without a pilot. I need new batteries, sadly, their "lifetime" warranty works, but they take a couple months with the drill and the batteries to get replacements. sigh. I'd happily pay a little to have replacements sent directly to me overnight and ship the old ones back, but they won't do that. I can't even buy new batteries, they don't make them anymore.

Sorry about the wall of text, it got away from me. I'll stop venting now. :)
 

4ssss

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Messages
481
Likes
278
#4
Why not just buy the lathe from "up north"? I drive to and from Dothan, Al. when going to visit relatives in a day, and use less than 180 gallons of fuel for both ways. Atlanta's 5 hours closer. Now I understand everyone doesn't get into trip mode and drive the way I do, but you can rent one of those heavy duty U-Haul trailers for something like $20 a day that will fit an old SB. I know it will take the load because I've moved Bridgeport mills with them. For a rough estimate, just add $450, (certainly under $650 if you stop for a night or 2) to the price of the "up north" lathe and figure out if it's worth it. Now before I start hearing about fuel prices and how it can't be done, the Southern states he would drive are probably a dollar cheaper a gallon than any other. Fill up before crossing the Mason-Dixon in VA, and you'll have enough to make it up to CT (if that's "up north" enough for you) with enough fuel to spare to get you back to re-fuel in NJ on the NY-NJ-PA border where it's also cheaper. This might sound like a rant, but a little planning and you'd get a nice used machine for a decent price. Too many guys whine about shipping costs when all you have to do is go get it yourself if you really want it and if the price is right. And before you ask, no, I won't do it for you for expenses. Fishing season is fast approaching and the machinery is being put to bed until next fall. Sorry.
 

wrmiller

Chief Tinkerer
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 21, 2013
Messages
3,416
Likes
1,397
#5
"Is an old domestic lathe worth the same as a new import lathe?"

Depends on the viewpoint of the person answering the question. For some, the answer is 'yes', for others the answer is 'no'. This is probably one of those questions that you are the best person to answer. Because you will have to live/deal with the answer, long after everyone here has forgotten the question and moved on.
 

Nogoingback

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
1,022
Likes
788
#6
The New Chinese vs. Old American Iron question is a never ending topic around here with valid points on both sides.
There is pretty much no question that the older American lathes were built to a standard that the Asian imports can't
match. But the older stuff is just that: most of them are getting pretty old and as such it's getting harder to find machines
in good condition with tooling. As those machines become more rare, their prices go up. It also very much depends on
what the local market is like.

It's also true that as a result, the machines themselves become projects. Some people like that and some don't. I've noticed that a lot of the folks in the O.A.I. camp just say "be patient and a good machine will turn up". It's true, but I've
noticed most of those folks already own lathes. For a newb, it's tough to spend what can be a long time finding the right machine when what they want to do is just get started on their new hobby. And, that assumes they have the skills and desire to work on an old machine which you possibly can no longer buy replacement parts for.

I went the old iron route and spent months and lots of $$$ bringing back an old machine to life. I learned a lot and
gained some satisfaction from having done so. But for what I spent I could have called Matt and gotten a new machine
with a full set of tools and no bed wear, not to mention a warranty.

It sounds like you answered your own question by saying that you want to just make parts rather than having the machine
become a project. And while Chinese machines in general have poor reputation, it seems that PM machines are the best of the bunch and their owners seem to like them.
 
Last edited:

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
4,480
Likes
4,844
#7
Really like the thoughtful responses in this post. What really amazes me is the quality and features found on the larger (11"+) Asian lathes, especially for the price. Trying to find an old lathe at any price with a D1 camlock spindle, +/- 0.0001" spindle runout, hardened and ground everything, no bed wear and all basic tooling is going to be nearly impossible.

So for roughly the same cost, would you recommend sticking with old iron or new chinesium?
To answer this, I would suggest you buy a new Taiwanesium lathe from PM. Dollar for dollar and bang for the buck, they are a good choice.
 

toploader

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
53
Likes
53
#8
For me this discussion revolves around what size lathe you want/need. If I was in the market for a south bend/craftsman/atlas I would most definitely go with a newer import

If you're looking for 14" swing or more old iron is gonna be the better bargain. In my opinion.
 

SSage

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Jun 16, 2017
Messages
149
Likes
72
#9
I looked at a few South Bends and Logans in the SE and the prices were too high for well worn machines. I wanted a bigger lathe, so having it shipped to my house was a major plus.

I'm tired of fighting old iron, my fairly small 1200 pound or so PM1236 is less hassle, easy to read dials, warranty, yep... Buy new. I spent less on the 1236 with tooling and accessories than some of the SBA 9's went for around here with modest tooling.

My first Asian lathe, it's nice and new, 3 year warranty. It's more precise than the old iron I've been around. It's a Chinese made machine, so the paint is typically china style finished, but I'm making good parts on it.
 

Ray C

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Likes
1,436
#10
When making a decision, consider if you want to make metric threads. I was recently considering an industrial piece from the late 70's that was in very good condition. -About a 4000lb machine and very good price. Chucks were in great shape, had a collet closer. It was coming from a tool & die shop and was operated and maintained by professionals. Saw it, ran it... Clean machine -but it did not cut metric threads. -Deal breaker!

Ray C.
 
C

cg285

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#11
there are other non asian lathes avail new (or used) but maybe not in the smaller sizes you are looking for. i suspect 1336 would be around the smallest. clausing metosa is one example (made in spain)
 

toploader

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
53
Likes
53
#12
When making a decision, consider if you want to make metric threads. I was recently considering an industrial piece from the late 70's that was in very good condition. -About a 4000lb machine and very good price. Chucks were in great shape, had a collet closer. It was coming from a tool & die shop and was operated and maintained by professionals. Saw it, ran it... Clean machine -but it did not cut metric threads. -Deal breaker!

Ray C.
You can cut metric threads on an inch lead screw.
 

magicniner

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Oct 21, 2017
Messages
442
Likes
386
#13
Quality is everything, something made to the best standards available 50 years ago yet badly maintained and abused will be worthless.
 

magicniner

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Oct 21, 2017
Messages
442
Likes
386
#14
When making a decision, consider if you want to make metric threads. I was recently considering an industrial piece from the late 70's that was in very good condition. -About a 4000lb machine and very good price. Chucks were in great shape, had a collet closer. It was coming from a tool & die shop and was operated and maintained by professionals. Saw it, ran it... Clean machine -but it did not cut metric threads. -Deal breaker!

Ray C.
Yup,
you need to be able to add non-standard gears into the gear train to cut metric threads on a lathe with an imperial gearbox, the lead screw has nothing to do with it, just the ability to add the required gears to the gear train to achieve metric pitches, although this may prove an unsuitable solution in a production environment, even if possible ;-)
 

7milesup

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 7, 2016
Messages
251
Likes
264
#15
I just bought a new PM833T vertical mill. It is Taiwan made, and the difference between the Chinese lathe and the Taiwan mill is very noticeable. Not saying that the Chinese lathe is bad at all (it too is from Matt) but there is a difference. I went through the same thing you are going through when I bought my lathe. Waited, and waited, and waited for a "good old piece of iron", but it did not come in the 2-ish years I was looking. I also did not know enough then what to even look for in used iron, so to me I went with new. Got tired of waiting and not knowing if anything would ever show up. There was an Atlas that came up a few months ago about 6 miles from my home. Went to look at it for the heck of it and after hearing how much he wanted for it and how old it was, I felt good with the decision I made to get a Chinese lathe from Matt. My next one is going to be a Taiwanese one from him though, like a 1340GT or such.
 

Ray C

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
5,215
Likes
1,436
#16
You can cut metric threads on an inch lead screw.
Yes, all of the modern machines with inch leadscrews have a means to cut metric threads. Very few machines that I'm aware of and are also commonly available on the used market, built/designed prior to the 1970's can natively cut metric threads. In some cases, a modification can be done with a couple extra shafts and custom gears. In the case of the Sheldons and LeBlonds I was looking at, it's not really feasible without a full re-design of the gearbox. Some of the newer units (1980's vintage) supported metric natively but those machines are selling for about $3000 more.

Ray
 

Dave Paine

Brass
Registered
Joined
May 10, 2014
Messages
813
Likes
597
#17
You can cut metric threads on an inch lead screw.
My lathe has imperial lead screw and can cut many metric threads, but it cannot cut any metric thread. This is expected, due to the limitations of the change gears. I was looking to see if I could cut a 3.5mm pitch thread for a member of my wood turning club and found the chart for my metal lathe did not include this metric pitch.

I have cut other more common metric threads.
 

Nogoingback

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
1,022
Likes
788
#18
Really like the thoughtful responses in this post. What really amazes me is the quality and features found on the larger (11"+) Asian lathes, especially for the price. Trying to find an old lathe at any price with a D1 camlock spindle, +/- 0.0001" spindle runout, hardened and ground everything, no bed wear and all basic tooling is going to be nearly impossible.
The other real benefit to PM machines is the large spindle bore available: 1" on the 10" machine and 1 1/2" on the 11" and 12". Old
machines in the same size range are usually less.
 
D

Deleted member 473

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#19
The other real benefit to PM machines is the large spindle bore available: 1" on the 10" machine and 1 1/2" on the 11" and 12". Old
machines in the same size range are usually less.
Ideally, I would love to have a 4-3/4" spindle bore on a 14" lathe in my shop! :big grin: Not going to get it unless I build it.

EDIT: I might settle for a 3-5/8" hole in the spindle.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

CluelessNewB

Active Resistor
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
1,128
Likes
622
#20
If you are willing to wait, look for bargains and put in some sweat equity the older machines can be a good value. I do see many older machines listed for crazy prices but once in a while some bargains do come along. I paid $250 for my Logan 820 with quick change gear box, steady and follower rest, 3 & 4 jaw chucks and a few other odds and ends. I spent about another $300 and probably 60 hours labor cleaning it up, fixing and painting. It's not perfect but it gets the job done for what I want to do. I very much enjoy fixing and using older machines. Most of the work I have done on my Logan has been making or repairing parts for other older machines! If that's not your thing then by all means buy something new. I don't think this is a one answer fits all question.
 

tyronejk

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Sep 20, 2017
Messages
5
Likes
4
#21
Wow, a lot of great responses and personal experiences in just a day. Thanks all for your input. Based on everyone's responses, I think a new import machine will work for me.
 

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
4,480
Likes
4,844
#22
Ideally, I would love to have a 4-3/4" spindle bore on a 14" lathe in my shop! :big grin: Not going to get it unless I build it.
Yeah, but once you got that lathe with the 4-3/4" spindle bore, you would have a 5" work piece!
 

Aaron_W

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 14, 2016
Messages
327
Likes
361
#23
I think a project lathe is kind of like a project car. It is a lot more fun when you have another car to drive to work everyday.
 

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
952
Likes
2,359
#24
Not adding anything here, but naturally depends on where you want to spend your time. Pick up new overseas iron and it "should" be functional right away so you'll be making chips within hours. You'll likely have "modern conveniences" of a flat/square compound for gauge blocks and indicators. Likely have the ability to thread both English and metric right out of the chute. You'll have a warranty. Has that "new lathe" smell.

Buy old American iron and you're likely getting a more robustly designed lathe as it was intended for heavy use. It will treat you properly if you treat it properly. Unknown factor is you don't know how it was treated by the previous owner(s). Might be OK, but you might be spending months on a rebuild. Once restored, it'd last your lifetime and probably your kids and grandkids.

I have a Grizzly G0709 14"x 40" lathe purchased new over 2 years ago. Really like the machine. Also have a 1963'ish Clausing 5418 12" x 24" lathe that came out of a high school shop. The Clausing is rock solid and just feels smoother than my Grizzly. But the Grizzly gets 95% of my lathe work. Main reason I bought the Grizzly is for the geared head speed changes and the universal quick change gear box (no quadrant gear changes to go between metric and English threading). My Clausing requires deep knee bends to change the speeds; open the base cabinet, throw a tensioning lever that's on the floor and slip the drive belt on a pair of cone pulleys. The Grizzly also has a brake as I'd gotten into a bad habit on the Clausing of dragging my hand on the collet chuck to stop the spindle. Top speed on my Clausing is something like 1600 RPM, without power feeds engaged it'll spin for about 45 seconds before coming to a stop (it's that smooth and well balanced).

Other question to ask when buying old iron is why is the guy/gal selling it? Are they getting rid of a problem child or just down sizing? You may consider asking some "go to" questions when looking at old iron. I looked at a well used Bridgeport years ago and frankly didn't know what questions to ask or what to look for. A machinist at work suggested I look at the rest of the shop for cleanliness and organization. Also ask how difficult it was to get to all of the lubrication points. Well, the shop was a pig sty and he had to start looking over the BP and his lathe for the lube points. Told me what I needed to know about his attentiveness to the preventive maintenance schedules - no sale that day!

Good luck on the hunt, always a tough call.

Bruce
 

Dredb

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Messages
94
Likes
90
#25
I've owned a Taiwan made 1340 lathe for 20 odd years. It gets cleaned oiled and adjusted. In the time I've owned it, I've replaced the counter shaft bearings (£3)
It replaced an old British made tool room lathe that was built like a battleship but was too small (5 X 20"), too big (1 ton +), too worn and too expensive to repair (It cost about the same to buy the 1340 that the parts would have cost).
I think I must be happy with it, I haven't looked for a replacement for a long time.
I would really like a new, top of the range long bed Myford Super7 on the industrial stand and with the complete range of factory accessories.
Unlikely to happen because they're not made anymore, it would cost 3 or 4 1340s, it would be too small anyway. Nice though!
 

cdhknives

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
435
Likes
90
#26
My 2 cents. I was given a 'free' Atlas lathe. It was my grandfathers. Worse than a 'free pony'. As much as I like 'communing with him' when I work on it, I would have been far better off financially and work wise putting the restoration and tooling money into a new 12x36...and I am not 'restoring' it, just getting it back into condition where it can make good parts.
 

CluelessNewB

Active Resistor
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
1,128
Likes
622
#27
New stuff isn't always good. My first purchased new Taiwan 17" made drill press back about 1987 was a total piece of junk. The runout was so bad it wasn't even good for woodworking, the switch failed within a few months and the motor not long after. It was replaced with a 15" 1940's vintage Walker Turner that I still have. Likewise my purchased new around 1989 Craftsman made in USA radial arm saw was total trash and would go out of alignment with a slight bump on the arm, this was replaced with a late 1960s vintage DeWalt which is still going strong. My first bench grinder was an 8 inch from Horror Fright, that was a weak sorry tool, gave that away to a neighbor that didn't anything so it was better than nothing. He has since passed it on.

Thanks for reminding me why I like older tools.
 

Cheeseking

Active User
Registered
Joined
Oct 30, 2012
Messages
724
Likes
306
#28
Colchester still makes good quality small lathe (albeit likely with chicom casting and that ugly 600 group paint color)
I will go to my grave with this little 11"x30 and count my lucky stars the day I found and "overpaid" for it.
I added the dro and chip guards.
45bd669eb5a6f8f570c338f9a9966019.jpg
42f76b9596b933fefe6c8aee8a22256a.jpg
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
5,841
Likes
6,156
#29
I've owned a Taiwan made 1340 lathe for 20 odd years. It gets cleaned oiled and adjusted. In the time I've owned it, I've replaced the counter shaft bearings (£3)
It replaced an old British made tool room lathe that was built like a battleship but was too small (5 X 20"), too big (1 ton +), too worn and too expensive to repair (It cost about the same to buy the 1340 that the parts would have cost).
I think I must be happy with it, I haven't looked for a replacement for a long time.
I would really like a new, top of the range long bed Myford Super7 on the industrial stand and with the complete range of factory accessories.
Unlikely to happen because they're not made anymore, it would cost 3 or 4 1340s, it would be too small anyway. Nice though!
Check out this guy who is restoring 7 Myford 7's (his second batch):
He is doing very nice work, there are more videos from him newer than this one on the subject.
 

wrmiller

Chief Tinkerer
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 21, 2013
Messages
3,416
Likes
1,397
#30
Wow, a lot of great responses and personal experiences in just a day. Thanks all for your input. Based on everyone's responses, I think a new import machine will work for me.
If you can afford it, go Taiwan made. Unlike the one person's experience here, things have changed a bit in the last ~40 years or so.

I bought a 1340GT lathe from PM (Precision Matthews), and have had zero issues with it. Good materials and quality of manufacture, and more accurate than I am. Tried to hit a .580" diameter yesterday and missed. It ended up being .58025" It wasn't the machine, it's the driver. ;)

Bought a 935S 'baby bridgeport' from the same vendor. Taiwan made. Quality of the castings, fit, and finish on this thing is very good. Table and knee movement is butter smooth. And again, more accurate than I am.

Didn't have to repair or rebuild anything. After setup and alignment, they both just start making parts. With proper care, these will outlast me by a long shot. Maybe my step-son will be interested in them by then. Right now he's too busy raising a family. :)
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top