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Is this a dumb idea

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Round in circles

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#31
Someone said in an earlier post that fluorescent lights don't flicker .. they do unfortunately at 60 cycle per second , most of the time it's not noticeable but is of a very dangerous problem to industry . if you run your lathe at 60 rpm on the same single electrical phase at 60 cycles per second as fluro lights 7 some incandescent bulbs the chuck appears stationary . In the UK it's 50 rpm @ 50 cycles per second ( Hz) .


People who are prone to having epileptic fits are often affected by 60 / 50 hertz flicker . One solution is to either have a phase shift device on some of the lights I an area or in large workshops have the lights evenly split across all the three different phases of the power supply . That way the machinery will always be showing it is moving if it is powered up & in gear etc.

As far as I know , inside an LED strip light all the LED's are run off low voltage groups of almost pure DC generated from smoothed bridge rectifiers so they do not flicker at all .
One LED light source failing in these LED tubes does not usually kill the whole tube either as they are wired up in parallel .

Re the deterioration of LED light out put quality . It's not a great as the deterioration of fluorescent tubes apparently , though I've not actually measured it as I'm now well retired , mentally, physically & emotionally :encourage:.

We used to have to take LUX light meter readings every six months for the light levels in all rooms then change out & record the change of all tubes & positions that were found to be below the required light output levels .
It was rare for a tube in an office to be more than two years old because of the reduced light out put it gives over time ( replacement depended on the work being done in the area or if it was a toilet , walk area etc. ) Each light fitting was then decorated with a bar coded sticker printed off our hand held work terminals, so we could see the history of the light & fitting on our computer records back in HQ where planning & ordering of spares was done. We did this to thousands & thousands of florescent tubes every year
 
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whitmore

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#32
Someone said in an earlier post that fluorescent lights don't flicker .. they do unfortunately at 60 cycle per second , most of the time it's not noticeable but is of a very dangerous problem to industry . if you run your lathe at 60 rpm on the same single electrical phase at 60 cycles per second as fluro lights 7 some incandescent bulbs the chuck appears stationary ....

As far as I know , inside an LED strip light all the LED's are run off low voltage groups of almost pure DC generated from smoothed bridge rectifiers so they do not flicker at all .
Magnetic-ballast (old style) fluorescents have light modulated at 120 Hz (twice the 60 Hz input) because they flash both on
the positive and negative half-cycles. Electronic ballast fluorescents, though, at 4 kHz or more, need not flicker because the ionized
gas doesn't have time to quench (stop glowing) between half-cycles. This GE blurb states
"High-frequency operation virtually eliminates lamp flickering typical in T12 electromagnetic systems"

<https://products.currentbyge.com/si...266_T12_Multi-Voltage_Electronic_Ballasts.pdf>

Some LED strips are low-voltage, using a DC power supply, and those don't flicker. The 'no ballast required' ones, that
run off straight AC, DO flicker, and it's almost impossible to tell (in a store, looking at a box) which is which. The scheme of
using many LEDs in series to match (at 3V per diode) the 120V or 240VAC is very inexpensive, but not trustworthy off
most power grids (in Florida, for instance, 2000V spikes are expected, from lightning transients).

Some of the LED flood (not strip) lights I've examined are driven by low-voltage DC supplies, and are lovable, if clunky.
 

Silverbullet

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#33
I just had to replace a curly florescent in my light by my bed . I ordered four of the 23 watt ? Led lights it's pretty good replacement . My son n law has sinced moved in with us and he works for Amazon so he brings these programmable lights mine he set up so it operates from my phone , the one in the front room uses voice control alexes or some nonsense. Variable control output even. Most all of my shop florescent lights need changing out I still have a few bulbs for the eight footers and the four ft ones. At the cost of those it'll be a long time for me . That's if I ever get out of pain , it's back as bad as it was before the last bout of nerve blocks. Worse cause I've terminated the morphine going into my body , the poison caused more then it helped. Hope this specialist helps but now I'm doubting..
 

Round in circles

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#34
Magnetic-ballast (old style) fluorescents have light modulated at 120 Hz (twice the 60 Hz input) because they flash both on
the positive and negative half-cycles. Electronic ballast fluorescents, though, at 4 kHz or more, need not flicker because the ionized
gas doesn't have time to quench (stop glowing) between half-cycles. This GE blurb states
"High-frequency operation virtually eliminates lamp flickering typical in T12 electromagnetic systems"

<https://products.currentbyge.com/si...266_T12_Multi-Voltage_Electronic_Ballasts.pdf>

Some LED strips are low-voltage, using a DC power supply, and those don't flicker. The 'no ballast required' ones, that
run off straight AC, DO flicker, and it's almost impossible to tell (in a store, looking at a box) which is which. The scheme of
using many LEDs in series to match (at 3V per diode) the 120V or 240VAC is very inexpensive, but not trustworthy off
most power grids (in Florida, for instance, 2000V spikes are expected, from lightning transients).

Some of the LED flood (not strip) lights I've examined are driven by low-voltage DC supplies, and are lovable, if clunky.

Thanks for the info , things have moved on apace wrt LED lighting that's for sure. Do you know if there are any gas discharge tubes in the latest LED strip lights that will reduce the effect of any high mains borne spikes .
We've been wiped out by lightening strikes happening about 400 mtrs away from our home , twice in the last seven years. Losing all manner of electrical stuff including all of the 21 low voltage incandescents that were on at the time of the strikes . Happily the insurance company picked up the cost of getting things sorted out .
 

Pro70z28

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#35
Sometimes in cases like this I wear a head light. LED light is bright and is always shining where I'm looking. Not good if someone comes in the room and you look up to say hi though. :eek: My wife tells me the light is annoying for that reason. lol
 

Suzuki4evr

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#36
What if you try to use the natural light by using mirrors in some manner above the lathe. Just a thought.
 

jdedmon91

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#37


I have a light mounted above my lathe like this. This is a older picture



This is how it’s now. You can’t see the light in it


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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