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Buffalo20

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#1
With a couple of friends (Norm and Trombone Pete), I finally got the new to me Rockwell 21-100 milling machine, into the shop (akin to shoveling 5# of crap into a 3# bag). We had to move 2 welders, 3 tool boxes, a plasma cutter, a bandsaw and numerous buckets of all kinds of stuff (I'm cleaning out my late FIL's shop). After shoehorning the mill into the shop, I got it permanently wired up, trammed the head and the vise. Hopefully it will actually cuts some chips in the morning.

The ER 32 x R8 collet chuck, I got, has a .008" run out, so I made arrangements to have a new on here ASAP (hopefully Friday). I'm also digging out a set of R8 collets, from the stockpile. I'm still not happy with the height of the mill, still working on a base design.The new drawbar seems to work fine.

I have to put a 1/4" keyway in a 1" shaft, it seems like a test for the new mill.
 

Terry Werm

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#2
I feel your pain. I recently acquired a new to me horizontal mill with a Fray vertical head attached to it. It took some effort to get it where I wanted it. I also put it on a caster base, so it sits higher than I really like, but I'll get used to it. It's a heavy beast, I have solid steel casters under it and it is still tough to get it moving.

Good luck with it, you'll soon be using is so much, you will wonder how in the world you ever got along without it.
 
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Buffalo20

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#3
Since my last post, I've been busy with the Rockwell milling machine. I changed out a bad bearing in the transmission (Graingers replaced no questions asked), I installed a different drive sheave/pulley, installed 2 new LED lights and raised the mill up 4".


1 - the mill in place
2 - the 4" x 4" x 1/4" box tubing, to raise up the mill
3 - the lights, bracket attached to the "transmission"
4 - bottom of the quill is now 57" off the floor rockwell 3 002x.jpg rockwell 3 005x.jpg rockwell 3 008x.jpg rockwell 3 011x.jpg
 
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Buffalo20

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#4
5 - the new speed chart
6 - the Rockwell, the Franken-Drill and the modified HF 20" drill press (also raised 4") nested together rockwell 4 004x.jpg rockwell 4 006x.jpg
 
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Buffalo20

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#5
The comment, that the lights were new, is a slight lie, I'm in the process of cleaning out the rest of the late FIL's shop and barn (MIL is selling the house after 53 years), I stole the flexible goose-neck lights from the shop, threw about 90% of the light assembly away, the base, switches, wiring and bulb sockets, hit the trash. I made a new mounting bracket, installed all new wiring, sockets and plugs, basically kept the goose-necks and the shades. That and some new super bright LED spot lights, I can now actually see the work area on the mill.
 

tweinke

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#6
Nice to get a machine online! Does the transmission work as you planned? It sure should add to the versatility of the mill. :encourage:
 
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Buffalo20

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#7
Nice to get a machine online! Does the transmission work as you planned? It sure should add to the versatility of the mill. :encourage:

I went from 6 speeds (ranging 340-6300 rpms) to 24 speeds (ranging from 125 to 6650 rpm), its not perfect, but is very usable.
 
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#8
Nice job and a lot better speed range then they came with. Theres a real nice fray mill by me it's very interesting I think it's there own take on a bridgeport. Lots of great design but some loss of rigidity . It's in my town but priced at $2,900 or there abouts. He also has a serious lathe with the ways that crank out the tail end. That's $2500. I'd like to have it but out of my site , ill never have $2500 again let alone that lathe unless he really does some trading for items. Again your mill now I think is much better then new. Good luck
 
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Buffalo20

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#9
I had to reconsider the 4" box tubing, under the mill, while raising the mill up, it also gave me some leveling issues. After about 1-2 hours of shimming and cursing, I decided to add leveling feet to the mill.

So last night, I installed some leveling feet (from a source I can not remember) under the front cross brace and a some tubing of the same height, under the back, it was a lot better, but because of the floor condition, there was still some shimming needed.

This morning I ventured out to the industrial supplier, and picked up some hardware to manufacture some back leveling feet.

2 - 4-1/2" of 1-1/4" B-7 Hardened all-thread
4 - 1-1/4"-7 2H heavy nuts
4 - 1-1/4"-7 jam nuts
2 - 1-1/8" flat washers
2 - 1-5/8" flat washers
4 - 1"-8 2H heavy nuts
4 - 1"-8 jam nuts


Welded a 1-1/4" 2H heavy nut and a 1-5/8" flat washer on the end the 2 pieces of all-thread. I then after the welding, put the pieces in the lathe and cut the bottoms of the piece, flat. Then assembled them, the welded piece, a jam nut and a flat washer.

Using the Jet toe-jack, lifted the back of the mill, removed the back cross tube, drilled 2, 1-1/4" holes in the bottom of the tube. The using the fabbed piece, put a 1-1/4" 2H nut inside the tube clamping the nut down tight and then welded it in place. After it cooled down, installed both fabbed feet in the box tubing and reinstalled it in the mill.

I went to the front of the mill, raised it up and removed the front cross tube. Removed the acquired leveling feet, with 1"-8 thread, then welded 2 of the 1" 2H heavy nuts inside the tube, making the leveling procedure easier. Reassembled the front leveling feet and the cross tube assembly and reinstalled it under the mill.

Then leveled the mill, side to side and front to back, it is now level, and rock solid, this added an addition 2" to the height of the mill, putting the bottom of the quill at 59" off the floor, but with the ER32 x R8 collet chuck, thats on the UPS truck for delivery, today, with stick out ~2" from the bottom of the quill, bringing it back down to about 56"-57", which I think is just about right.

1 - the hardware
2 - the fabbed piece
3 - in the tube
4 - ready to go under rockwell 5 001x.jpg rockwell 5 006x.jpg rockwell 5 009x.jpg rockwell 5 012x.jpg
 
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Buffalo20

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#11
I’ve been using the Rockwell mill quite a bit lately. I wasn’t really sure if I’d use it a lot, as it originally was bought to keep it out of a wrecker’s yard. I used it earlier this week to cut a series of 3/8” x 6” slots, in 6” x 8” x 1/4” steel plates, Plunge, then mill the full length in one pass, with a 3/8” 2 flute carbide mill. Six plates, three slots in each plate, so about 108” of slots, mill never sounded strained, and ran like a dream.
 
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