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Lathe Headstock Work Stop G0602

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RJSakowski

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#1
I have used a part stop in my old Craftsman lathe headstock for many years. When making multiple parts, it provided accurate positioning of the parts in the chuck and it allowed removal of parts for measurement when machining to precise lengths.

When I bought my Grizzly G0602, I really missed that feature and decided to add it . The modification is fairly simple. It consists of a 3/8 -16 x 18" threaded rod, some jam nuts, and a threaded adapter for the back end of the spindle to allow for adjustment of the rod.

A 1-1/8-16 NS tap was purchased on eBay and used to tap the spindle. As the tap was started, the spindle was rotated to verify that the tap was running true.

The adapter was made from a piece of 1-1/2" hexagonal brass bar stock. The stock was turned and threaded for a 1-1/8-16 NS thread. A scrap piece of stock was threaded with the tap and used as a thread gage. The adapter was bored and threaded for a 3/8-16 NC thread and a 75 degree countersink was cut in the base to aid in starting the threaded rod.

I made a number of threaded rods with different diameter ends to work with smaller stock. To keep the rod centered for cases where the rod end is not inside the chuck jaws, I machined a washer held in place with two nuts which centers the rod in the spindle bore. The nut end of the rods are tapered to ease in installation.

Photos show the adapter and several threaded rods made for various work. While this adapter was made for a Grizzly G0602, it can be modified to work with any lathe. IMG_20150220_104312495.jpg IMG_20150220_104328156.jpg IMG_20150220_104501956.jpg
 

calstar

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#2
Please post a pic(if you have one) of the stop installed on the lathe.

thanks, Brian
 

RJSakowski

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#3
Please post a pic(if you have one) of the stop installed on the lathe.

thanks, Brian
Hi Brian,
Here are pictures of the work stop installed in the lathe spindle. The stop extends into the jaws and is set approximately 1/2 inch from the face of the chuck jaws. The end of the stop was turned down to permit chucking a .350 diameter part. The second picture shows the adapter in place with a stop rod installed.

Bob IMG_20150220_213144537.jpg IMG_20150220_213210905.jpg
 

Wreck™Wreck

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#4
Good idea and nicely done.

I would find it a bit slow setting up such a stop, I would replace the threaded rod with a solid 1/2" rod, drill out the brass part and install 2 or more set screws through the hex flats to the bore, use set screws with a blunt end.

Install part in chuck and install brass adapter in spindle end, push solid rod through until it contacts the part and tighten set screws, done.

At the shop where I work I use a 3/4" round bar with a short 1/2-13 male thread on the end so that end attachments may be easily changed. You will one day have a small diameter part in the chuck where the back of the jaws interfere with the stop or a part that you wish to drill through and not hit the stop. Also a spindle plug is a good idea, I normally use a plastic material, that is drilled for the stop rod and has an OD slightly smaller then the spindle ID that keeps the rod on center and not whipping about in the spindle bore.

2hx4zki.jpg

SPINDLESTOP.jpg
 

Bill C.

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#6
Good idea and nicely done.

I would find it a bit slow setting up such a stop, I would replace the threaded rod with a solid 1/2" rod, drill out the brass part and install 2 or more set screws through the hex flats to the bore, use set screws with a blunt end.

Install part in chuck and install brass adapter in spindle end, push solid rod through until it contacts the part and tighten set screws, done.

At the shop where I work I use a 3/4" round bar with a short 1/2-13 male thread on the end so that end attachments may be easily changed. You will one day have a small diameter part in the chuck where the back of the jaws interfere with the stop or a part that you wish to drill through and not hit the stop. Also a spindle plug is a good idea, I normally use a plastic material, that is drilled for the stop rod and has an OD slightly smaller then the spindle ID that keeps the rod on center and not whipping about in the spindle bore.

2hx4zki.jpg
You have a good design too. I think I would use a smaller diameter rod and made adapters to fit larger diameter stock. You should file a copy of your design on the drawings site. Thank you for sharing.
 

Bill C.

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#7
Every lathe owner someday could use a part stop. It could be a good beginners project. Might help if they make one to mark all the parts of the stop before they wander off or get used for something else, just saying.
 

RJSakowski

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#10
Why brass& not steal?
Steel would work as well. I used brass because it is easier to machine, has better lubricity, but most of all because I happened to have a piece of 1-1/2" brass hex stock on hand and I didn't have to machine the hex. I used a steel lug bolt drilled and tapped for 1/4-20 rod for my 6" Atlas.

Bob
 

WoodBee

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#11
At the shop where I work I use a 3/4" round bar with a short 1/2-13 male thread on the end so that end attachments may be easily changed.
Nice design. Any reason why you prefer a male thread on the end? Wouldn't a female thread be "more" flexible? Guess it works either way.
Peter



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WoodBee

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#12
I have used a part stop in my old Craftsman lathe headstock for many years. When making multiple parts, it provided accurate positioning of the parts in the chuck and it allowed removal of parts for measurement when machining to precise lengths.
Good idea! I think I would also benefit from making one. This one goes high on the to do list!
Peter

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