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Leblond Lathe and L0 Spindle...

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Ray C

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#1
All,

Can anyone whose used the L-type (i.e. L0 or L-0) spindle used on a lot of Leblond lathes comment on the good/bad points about them? How does it rank compared to the D-type (i.e. D1-4 etc) in terms of repeatability and stability? I remember my father's lathe had an L-type but at the time, I didn't pay a lot of attention to the construction of the machine other than knowing it was solid and heavy. For the most part, I never had the need to remove the chuck but once or twice in all the years I used it. Is it faster or slower to swap chucks vs a D-type?

EDIT: It's my understanding that L-type was supplanted by D-type in the late 60's. Does anyone know the history and rationale thereof?


Thanks

Ray
 

8ntsane

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#2
The L type was used for a long time. My Sidney is the L-1 and 1941
I think they had the L-00 and went up to L-1 and L-2 in larger sizes.
They called them long American taper, and also were key driven. Mine
has a 5/8 wide key. I think in design, they were the heavy hoggers of the day.

The D type has been around a long time as well. Not sure exactly when it started.
The D type I believe to be a more modern way to mount chucks. Probably much quicker to swap out chucks compared to the L- type. I think as time marched on, industry demanded a faster way to change over lathe chucks, and the L-type were very heavy, and added to rotational weight. The L-type American long taper, were the choice for many American machines that where considered work horses. But as time marched on, things changed in design, and for the most part, the better.

Ray, I cant say exactly when they started using the D type, But I am sure its well before the 60s
From what I remember reading, the L type spindle was a LeBlonde first. Come to think of it, another guy I know has a 1943 Sidney, same machine as mine but a few yrs newer than mine. It has the D-type spindle on his. The D-type should be faster to swap out, and the spanner wrench for the L-type is huge, and heavy.
 

Ray C

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#3
I looked at the UK website and it mentions the D-type eventually replaced the L-type and the L-type was popular from the 30's to 60's. Most likely, their existence was shared in time. I'm not really too concerned about the historical timing but rather if it was replaced due to it being inferior in some way. From my view, I'm not too terribly thrilled with D-type and sure don't want to take a step down.

Ahhh, the big spanner... I was in the shop one day and I accidentally dropped it. My dad was nearby. The wrench didn't hit the ways (thank heavens) but my dad looked at me as though he was about to clamp me to the ground with it by the neck and do a "Trevon Martin" on me. And he was the kind of guy who'd drop elbows.

Ray
 

twstoerzinger

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#4
I have a 1969, 14" Clausing lathe which uses the L-00. On the 14" Clausing, I have learned that the L-00 mount can be very rigid and makes it fairly quick and easy to change chucks. The issue is that both the bore of the chuck and the outside of the spindle must be squeaky clean. A small piece of swarf can upset the run-out of the chuck. Also, the exposed portion of the spindle is subject to damage when running on centers, or with collets (when the L-00 mount is not used). My lathe has an aluminum guard which fits over the taper and is captured by the large threaded nut to protect the taper surface when it is not being used.
The L-00 size allows for a 1.4" bore in the spindle, so you can get 1-3/8 diameter stock to pass through the chuck.

Terry S.
 

Old Iron

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#5
I have a 1953 LeBlond Regal 13" and it has the L-OO taper I really like the easy way to change out the chuck. I've never had a problem with repeatable.

I also have a thread protector for it that I saved off a Clausing 13" Lathe so running between tapers isn't a problem.

Paul
 
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